Sporting Clays Chokes

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  • Sporting Clays Chokes

    Hi Guys

    What chokes should i be using for sporting clays?? I have an Akkar Churchill that came with 5 chokes (Cylinder, Skeet, Improved Cylinder, Modified, Improved Modified & Full) I am currently using what it was shipped with IC on the bottom & M up top

    I am a newbie to sporting clays and am not sure if i should be using a more open chokes? Also what barrel should be shot first tighter choke or more open choke.

    Cheers

  • #2
    it sort of depends on how quick you can shoot them.
    the longer you take to be on target (or in front of) the tighter the choke required,........on average.
    I've done pretty good in the past with my skeet gun, but that's a 'quick' gun.
    if you're not sure, a good starting point would be skeet (open) in your first barrel, then 1/4 or 1/2 in your second barrel.
    same applies for tower.

    edit: inbound clays = open choke
    outbound clays = 1/4 choke perhaps.

    Comment


    • Shotgunner
      Shotgunner commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Send-it" post=29497
      it sort of depends on how quick you can shoot them.
      the longer you take to be on target (or in front of) the tighter the choke required,........on average.
      I've done pretty good in the past with my skeet gun, but that's a 'quick' gun.
      if you're not sure, a good starting point would be skeet (open) in your first barrel, then 1/4 or 1/2 in your second barrel.
      same applies for tower.

      edit: inbound clays = open choke
      outbound clays = 1/4 choke perhaps.
      Are you talking about a skeet course? Skeet course are a lot smaller than the sporting clays course I shoot, some of the targets are fired from towers 30 or 40 feet up and some must fly by 30 metres out. I think those chokes would be too loose for that.

  • #3
    That is what I use. I tried IC and IM but I found the IM to tight so wound it back to M and it works better. Some people prefer using two of the same chokes because the targets change the directions that they come from but I don't get that technical, it is just bang and giggle for me. The really serious guys pattern their guns on each choke with different types of ammo to see what works best.
    "Love the bush for its own sake and you will never have an unsuccessful hunt".

    Comment


    • #4
      Mate, bought exactly the same gun last week and took it out to the range to run it in. Was shooting DTL (down the line) which apparently is shot using Improved Mod & Full chokes so swapped out the factory-installed one for those recommended and didn't hit a thing for the first 6 or 7 clays; stepped off the line and (at the suggestion of one of the "old hands") changed out the chokes for a more open pattern (Improved Cyl & Improved Mod) & started nailing those clays one after the other. Since my Akkar's a Sporter they apparently do better with more open chokes at DTL; Trap models will have a higher comb (& maybe a higher-rise stock too?) which evidentially works better with tighter chokes at DTL.

      Comment


      • #5
        shotgunner,

        no,.....sporting.
        well that's what I use.
        maybe the courses I been on are slightly smaller.
        but you do make a good point.
        the larger courses could benefit from tighter chokes, for increased range.

        oh wait a minute,........are you referring to 'field n game'?
        in that case,.......yes,......I use different chokes to suit that particular course.

        Comment


        • Shotgunner
          Shotgunner commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by Send-it" post=29506
          shotgunner,

          no,.....sporting.
          well that's what I use.
          maybe the courses I been on are slightly smaller.
          but you do make a good point.
          the larger courses could benefit from tighter chokes, for increased range.

          oh wait a minute,........are you referring to 'field n game'?
          in that case,.......yes,......I use different chokes to suit that particular course.
          Yup, FnG ... that would explain it

        • HarryL
          HarryL commented
          Editing a comment
          I read an article by an english guy called George Rigweed. He is pretty good at field and game and he reckons he won most of his stuff with full and full chokes. He said you can hit the close stuff with tight chokes but never the long stuff with open chokes. Makes sense

      • #6
        Originally posted by phoenix" post=29496
        Hi Guys
        What chokes should i be using for sporting clays?? I am currently using what it was shipped with IC on the bottom & M up top

        I am a newbie to sporting clays and am not sure if i should be using a more open chokes? Also what barrel should be shot first tighter choke or more open choke.
        Improved Cylinder in the bottom barrel, Modified in the top.
        You'd be surprised just how far that IC choke will stretch out.

        As to which barrel to shoot first - it is usual to shoot the more open choke first.
        In sporting where you may have a pair that has a long bird and a close bird, you can opt to change the barrels around to suit the stand.
        By that I mean if you had a report pair and the long bird was first followed by a close in, fast moving bird, it'd make sense to use the tighter choke on the longer bird, so you'd switch barrels around to shoot the top barrel first.
        Don't forget to switch them back.

        If all of that is too confusing - leave them alone and use the bottom one first.

        Wider chokes - up to you, however on a sporting ground you're likely to be presented with birds at varying distances.
        Putting anything tighter in at the moment while you're learning is just making things harder. You don't need much more than Modified while you're starting out.

        Some guys I know run the same choke in both barrels with the same shell, so there's no thought needs to go into selection, all the attention is then focused upon hitting the bird.

        It comes down to personal preference in the end.

        Comment


        • phoenix
          phoenix commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks Nigel i will leave them how they are a practice practice practice

      • #7
        A quote from 19 times World Champion George Digweed on chokes for Sporting Clays

        "My gun is 100% standard, full & full chokes, because I firmly believe if you can’t hit it with full chokes and a White Gold 7.5, then it can’t be killed! "

        Enough said :lol:

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        • Guest's Avatar
          Guest commented
          Editing a comment
          If you're going to quote the interview then use the whole thing, not just one sentence taken out of context.

          "My gun is 100% standard, full & full chokes, because I firmly believe if you can’t hit it with full chokes and a White Gold 7.5, then it can’t be killed! Last year, I asked Perazzi to make me a spare set of barrels because some FITASC targets were being set that were about 15-25ft away. Every target needs respect, but I felt that after shooting in Austria where I missed 3 or 4 of those and lost a shoot by 2 targets, that I was handicapping myself by having full choke. So Perazzi made me an exactly matched set of barrels, same weight etc. but with 3/8 & 5/8 chokes."

          Digweed interview

      • #8
        Crikey, the way that these threads have been turning into pissing contests lately have me wanting to turn up with a full choke on more than my shotgun ...
        "Love the bush for its own sake and you will never have an unsuccessful hunt".

        Comment


        • #9
          My two cents worth ;

          For a beginner, start with Imp Cyl and Modified (or 1/4 & 1/2) if your gun uses those designations. Stick with 28 gram, #7.5 shot cartridges, or possibly #8 if targets are presented 'face on' or are smaller (midis). Stick with #7.5's for going away targets.
          As you gain experience and ability, you may consider other chokes for certain targets. Find out what other 'average' shooters at your club range use and check their scores / watch them shoot. Note the results they get.

          Take note of how well you break your targets, if you are chipping most of them, your pattern (choke) is probably nearly too open for that range, if most targets are 'smoked', then your patterns (chokes) need not be as tight.
          This post may be fact or opinion, it is up to you to decide which.

          Comment


          • #10
            I sort of think that if Digweed and Faulds are the greatest two Field and Game shooters of ALL TIME and the BOTH us FULL and FULL as their choice of choke I reckon you need to pay a bit of attention.

            Comment


            • #11
              an extract I found from a very reputable source
              this may help explain why certain chokes are used in certain circumstances.
              make what you will of it.


              Choosing a choke for Sporting Clays

              We love a day at the sporting clays range. Elk Creek makes us happy. Given that, we often get questions about chokes, a common issue, especially at sporting clays ranges. This is complicated by the fact that most manufacturers ignore sporting clays when they talk about their chokes--they focus on the hunting application they're designed for. What if you're hunting orange discs, not birds? Hopefully this article will help you out.

              Most shotguns have 5 basic chokes, in order of how much restriction/choke they give you: Cylinder (no choke at all), Improved Cylinder, Modified, Improved Modified and Full (very tight choke). Often they're marked by the acronym -- C, IC, M, IM, F, or sometimes based on hashes or cut-outs on the top of the choke. Usually the fewer the cut-outs, the tighter the choke, but this varies by manufacturer.

              Basically, the further you get down the list the more "choke" you have. The more choke, the tighter the shot pattern at longer distances. So if you're shooting close targets, you want a more open pattern like a cylinder or improved cylinder (better chance of hitting the clay since you're spreading your shot over a wider pattern). The farther shots, or shots where you can't see the whole clay (like it's on its side), may require a tighter pattern, like improved modified or full.

              So if you're shooting clays at less than 25 yards, may want to go with a cylinder, which has a really wide pattern (about 75% of pellets are at the point of aim at 2o yards). Every 5 additional yards bumps you up another choke. So you get to about 40 yards and you're about about 75% with a full choke.

              For sporting clays, improved cylinder is usually a good all-around choke, or even cylinder on an easier course (like Elk Creek's Woods course). It lets you hit the majority of the clays. Changing chokes every stand tends to make it harder, not easier, to hit the birds. Shooting the gun is most of the battle. Changing chokes mid-course can make a great shooter excellent, but it'll never make a beginner or even good shooter great. Learn to shoot the gun, focus on your technique, and stick with a choke that will let you get more birds than less.

              Add ammo selection to the list and you've got a big variety of outcomes. We typically shoot 8 or 7 1/2 shells--Remington or Federals from Walmart/Dicks-- with an improved cylinder in the botom barrel and a modified in the top. Since we typically set our over/under to shoot bottom barrel first, this lets us get the hard shot first with a bit tighter pattern, then a forgiving choke for the second shot, when you're all jazzed up from shooting the first bird. We also tend to shoot the farther shot first when hitting doubles, but this really depends on how the course is set up. On some courses where most of the birds are close we use a cylinder on top and an improved cylinder on bottom. If we're shooting an auto-loader, an improved cylinder does the trick more than not, maybe a modified if the birds seem to be far out there. But every shooter's different, every course is different, and in reality, it's more up to the shooter than the choke.

              So if you're headed to Elk Creek, throw a IC in your gun (typically the one with 4 cut-outs on the top) and you should be OK to go. If you're going to shoot at longer clays while there, or try the 5-stand, bring a few others with you and play around a bit. Every bird's different, every shooter's different, and make sure to bring plenty of bullets!

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              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                No need to overthink chokes when shooting clays. ( versus trying to / needing to humanely take game )

                When I first started out, I like most others, thought the very last thou' of constriction was crucial.

                Nowadays, when someone asks what ( screw ) chokes I'm running - my usual response is 'I don't know'.
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