Extractors vs Ejectors

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  • Extractors vs Ejectors

    Hi Everyone,
    By now you may have realised that I am new to shotguns and hence the reason for the simple questions.

    This question relates to extractors vs ejectors. My logic (or lack there of it) suggests that in normal hunting situation extractors would suit on the grounds that you dont fire too many shots and and allows you to easily clean up after yourself rather than dropping empty shells all over the ground (of course you can pick them up). I also assume ejectors are very useful when clay shooting due to ease with re-loading and the extra shots.

    What do people prefer and are my assumptions correct? Look forward to your replies

    Cheers
    VB1971

  • #2
    I have found that extractors work well on a SxS shottie since the spent shells can easily be flicked out together using two fingers; it's a little bit more cumbersome on U/Os due to the barrels being stacked one on top of the other however with a bit of practice I'm sure you could remove the spent shells just as fast.

    The reason why I chose extractors on my new U/O (apart from the price that is; it was over $100 cheaper than the ejector model) is because the range where I'll be mostly using the gun to bust clays at has a safety rule which states that when using a shotgun with ejectors you are to open the gun with your hand over the chambers (so that the ejected shells hit your cupped hand & fingers and then stay there) and then the spent shells are to be removed manually with your fingers. Apparently, this rule was brought in due to people hitting themselves in the face with ejected shells and chipping teeth or the spent shells sailing over their shoulder and hitting the person standing behind them on the line in the face (and of course then everyone running around like little girls trying to sue the range for damages, FFS ) so given this situation I couldn't see any advantages in having ejectors over extractors.

    I suspect that in the field ejectors may be an advantage as they enable you to reload quicker and get off a volley of rapid-shots when the game is thick on the ground or in the air.

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      nothing funnier than watching a newb get slapped in the face with ejected shells for the first time

    • druid01
      druid01 commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by GSR" post=25188
      I have found that extractors work well on a SxS shottie since the spent shells can easily be flicked out together using two fingers; it's a little bit more cumbersome on U/Os due to the barrels being stacked one on top of the other however with a bit of practice I'm sure you could remove the spent shells just as fast.

      The reason why I chose extractors on my new U/O (apart from the price that is; it was over $100 cheaper than the ejector model) is because the range where I'll be mostly using the gun to bust clays at has a safety rule which states that when using a shotgun with ejectors you are to open the gun with your hand over the chambers (so that the ejected shells hit your cupped hand & fingers and then stay there) and then the spent shells are to be removed manually with your fingers. Apparently, this rule was brought in due to people hitting themselves in the face with ejected shells and chipping teeth or the spent shells sailing over their shoulder and hitting the person standing behind them on the line in the face (and of course then everyone running around like little girls trying to sue the range for damages, FFS ) so given this situation I couldn't see any advantages in having ejectors over extractors.

      I suspect that in the field ejectors may be an advantage as they enable you to reload quicker and get off a volley of rapid-shots when the game is thick on the ground or in the air.
      We get a bonus clay point for the shells flying over our shoulder and landing in the bin, almost as much fun as actually shooting the clays lol

  • #3
    my old 12G is an extractor model. i do envy the ejectors but when it comes down to it, i think i prefer extractors. for the <1 second extra is takes me to reload, i don't have to spend that time picking up shells off the ground and leaving a mess for someone. i would imagine it is similar for hunting in vehicles etc. not slapping someone in the face with 2x shells. just crack it open, pull em out. put new ones in.

    still, it's hilarious seeing people getting hit with empty shells when they go flying.

    Cheers,

    Nuzo

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    • #4
      I have read that back when they shot live birds(as opposed to clays) they didn't use ejectors so that the other shooters couldn't see what brand of shell you were using....you could discretely put the live ones in and remove them once they were fired with out any body knowing about the new wonder cartridge that you were using!
      Oh dear, how sad....never mind.

      Comment


      • TwoFourThree
        TwoFourThree commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Pilch303" post=25290
        I have read that back when they shot live birds(as opposed to clays) they didn't use ejectors so that the other shooters couldn't see what brand of shell you were using....you could discretely put the live ones in and remove them once they were fired with out any body knowing about the new wonder cartridge that you were using!
        Yes, true story. If you found a really good shell you did not want your competitors knowing you were using a 'better' shell than them. Could well have just been 'gamesmanship' as well.

        The same sort of thing probably still goes on today. If someone wins a big shoot using a 'new' brand of shell, you can bet that at the next shoot some of their competition will be using it as well.

    • #5
      I prefer ejectors for a faster reload in the field. That's also where having brightly coloured shell casings helps...for picking 'em up later...
      If not under time pressure, then I take my time opening the action, stop the empty shells as they come out and pocket them.

      Of course, some shotties allow you to set whether you want 'em ejected or extracted...
      Member of the Aunty Jack Firearm Appreciation Society - "Now be a good little Aussie and learn how to shoot or I'll rip your bloody arms off......and I will too!"

      "Have you tried unloading it then reloading it?" - Roy Trenneman on fixing firearm problems

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      • #6
        Ejectors are fine for trap shooting so long as you remember to put your hand over em to catch em otherwise they end up on the ground and need to be picked up at some stage, extractors would be better suited to that particular shotgun participation I feel. For hunting either would be fine really as a lot of shots aren't that common and its easy to pick up a few shells here and there.
        Whacking Varmints is my passion!

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