What to look for when shouldering a gun for the first time

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What to look for when shouldering a gun for the first time

    Hi Shooters,

    I recently posted a topic about the Franchi Phoenix and realised that my real question was "What to look for when shouldering a gun for the first time"
    Being new to the shotgun sport I can only imagine that others have the same question or would at least benefit from knowing the answer. Hopefully this will save another 1000 comments on other topics saying things like "just pick what gun fits best" and "go into a shop and try all the guns they have".

    At the moment I am looking at 3 things and I have found 3 guns that seemingly fit me well. (Lanber 2097, Franchi Phoenix, Miroku MK70)

    These are the 3 things that I am currently doing when shouldering a gun for the first time.

    1: How cleanly / easily the gun rises to my shoulder.
    I found that the Lanber 2087 and Rizzini Homba either too short or just weird.

    2: How my eye looks down the gun.
    I currently have a 2nd hand Lanber shotgun from the 1970's. It is a field gun and definitely does not fit my well. I need to move my head into an awkward position to see down the gun correctly and it often leaves me with a nice black cheek after a round of clays. Having said that it only cost me $300 and I still love it to bits as it has got me into the sport and I can still use it for shooting foxes and bunnies, or as a backup gun for guests.

    3: How the gun swings when chasing an imaginary clay / rabbit.
    When trying out a few guns I notice they seem to move / swing really well. I cannot think of an example at the moment, however I do remember thinking that the Miroku MK70 felt very stable and smooth to chase after imaginary targets in the shop.

    And that is it.
    Please let me know what else i should be doing.

    Cheers

    MB

  • #2
    It's a very subjective topic to put in words and I'm likely to express it badly.

    For me it's about how the gun balances between your hands.
    When it comes to the shoulder it should feel like the barrel is going where you're looking.
    Not enough weight in the stock and it'll fly about wildly and won't remain stable on the trajectory.
    It should be lively but controlled.

    It's hard to know what you're looking for if you haven't handed many guns.
    After you've tried a few or some kind folks have let you have a shot of their higher grade guns you'll begin to see and feel the difference.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by MoreBravo" post=15743
      Hi Shooters,

      I recently posted a topic about the Franchi Phoenix and realised that my real question was "What to look for when shouldering a gun for the first time"
      Being new to the shotgun sport I can only imagine that others have the same question or would at least benefit from knowing the answer. Hopefully this will save another 1000 comments on other topics saying things like "just pick what gun fits best" and "go into a shop and try all the guns they have".

      At the moment I am looking at 3 things and I have found 3 guns that seemingly fit me well. (Lanber 2097, Franchi Phoenix, Miroku MK70)

      These are the 3 things that I am currently doing when shouldering a gun for the first time.

      1: How cleanly / easily the gun rises to my shoulder.
      I found that the Lanber 2087 and Rizzini Homba either too short or just weird.

      2: How my eye looks down the gun.
      I currently have a 2nd hand Lanber shotgun from the 1970's. It is a field gun and definitely does not fit my well. I need to move my head into an awkward position to see down the gun correctly and it often leaves me with a nice black cheek after a round of clays. Having said that it only cost me $300 and I still love it to bits as it has got me into the sport and I can still use it for shooting foxes and bunnies, or as a backup gun for guests.

      3: How the gun swings when chasing an imaginary clay / rabbit.
      When trying out a few guns I notice they seem to move / swing really well. I cannot think of an example at the moment, however I do remember thinking that the Miroku MK70 felt very stable and smooth to chase after imaginary targets in the shop.

      And that is it.
      Please let me know what else i should be doing.

      Cheers

      MB
      1. Stocks are easily lengthened with a recoil pad. Try again with a slip-on pad (or a thick coat or jumper) Can't help you with 'weird'

      2. Well worth getting your old gun altered so it shoots were you look without having to get your head in an 'arkward' position. A few shells at a pattern plate will soon tell you what changes are needed. Just throw the gun to your shoulder while keeping your eyes on where you want to hit and shoot as soon as the gun is mounted. do NOT try and 'aim' the gun, just POINT it.
      This post may be fact or opinion, it is up to you to decide which.

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        2. Well worth getting your old gun altered so it shoots were you look without having to get your head in an 'arkward' position. A few shells at a pattern plate will soon tell you what changes are needed. Just throw the gun to your shoulder while keeping your eyes on where you want to hit and shoot as soon as the gun is mounted. do NOT try and 'aim' the gun, just POINT it.
        This I will definately try. It actually makes a lot of sence and I am very interested to see how close i actually get to the target by just "pointing" instead of aiming.

        I will let you know how I go.

    • #4
      As a first point I'd shut your eyes and mount the gun. Then open your eyes and see if you are looking down the rib. Basically are you looking where the gun is pointing. That will give you a first point of reference as to fit. Depending on what sort of shooting you are doing will determine if throwing the gun up has any bearing. If you are shooting DTL or American skeet or any other discipline that is shot from a premounted position then throwing the gun up has little relevance, also guns for these disciplines often have a more curved recoil pad so as to aid in mounting the gun in the correct position time after time. If you are doing more field shooting or gun down shooting then you need a gun that when thrown up with your eyes closed comes to the same position every time. I would suggest that very few people will actually get a gun off the shelf that fits perfectly. If you take your shooting seriously I'd get a gun that feels good and the spend the extra time and money getting it fitted properly. So that when you mount it the gun is in the same position. If you have to wriggle your head so you see straight down the rib, it doesn't matter how good you think it feels it doesn't fit.
      That doesn't mean you won't be able to shoot it just that it will be easier and more rewarding if it is fitted.
      Personally I have had my Clay target guns fitted however I have a Browning that was my Grandfathers and I don't want to change it. Can I hit things with it. Hell yeah. Does it occasionally slap me in the face and kick me about more than I'd like?
      Sure does.
      Would I go out and shoot a 100 target day with it?
      Not while I have a choice.

      Comment

      Working...
      X