My AR-15

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  • My AR-15

    The AR-15, developed by Eugene Stoner as a light automatic rifle made of primarily of polymers and aluminum alloy, is an ubiquitous rifle of the modern era. It uses the "direct impingement" operating system pioneered by the French MAS 44 and 49 rifles where the hot gasses that are propelling the bullet down the barrel are vented into an assembly that uses those gasses as a fluid piston to actuate the unlocking and rearward travel of the bolt carrier (by pushing against and expanding inside the gas key and carrier), cycling the action. It is magazine-fed by detachable box magazines, usually aluminum, but other materials have been used and polymer magazines are quite popular today. Typical magazine capacity is 20 or 30 rounds. Despite a rocky early beginning, the AR-15 and it's derivatives have proven to be extremely popular for their light weight, accuracy, inexpensive production costs, and modularity.


    DSCF0246 by chazbotic, on Flickr


    DSCF0247 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Manufactured by hundreds of small companies for sporting and defense use in the US, and by a few companies overseas, the AR-15 is a very popular rifle. Mine is a relatively recently made ST-15 lower with an FN upper, produced in the US for commercial sales. There is an estimated 20 million privately owned AR-15's in the US and climbing. There are two primary patterns of AR-15, the military specification and the commercial specification. The military specification is an outgrowth of the commercial sport rifles produced and marketed by Colt Firearms in the late 70's and early 80's. At this time, there were only a handful of AR-15 producers. Olympic Arms produced the commercial specification based on parts and some measurements as an improved sporting rifle that was slightly different from the military rifles from Colt, which purchased the patent and contract from ArmaLite for military manufacturing. Along with DPMS, FNMI, Colt supplies the majority of military AR-15s.

    Olympic is notable for being the first company to produce flat-top upper receivers, free floating aluminum hand guards, pistol caliber conversions, and AR-15 based pistols and really started the aftermarket trend for many things seen as "standard" today. Previous to the 80's, there were numerous differences between commercial and military specification rifles, but after about 1990 and the buyout of the ArmaLite brand by Eagle Arms and the push for "custom" ARs from Olympic Arms, those differences have more or less disappeared. With the size of some screws, certain internal components, and the outer diameter of the stock remaining nearly all AR-15s have interchangeable components.


    DSCF0252 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Cleaning is relatively simple: clear the weapon, hinge open the action against the front take-down pin and retract/remove the bolt carrier group.


    DSCF0253 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    A point of some contention is the design of the locking lugs on the bolt itself - many feel that 7 little lugs are insufficient for hard use and the high pressures in carbine rifles. There are many many aftermarket parts for enhancing the carrier group.

    Sights can be almost anything but the traditional peep sight is still the standard. Optics are very popular, but since I rarely choose to shoot farther than a few hundred meters, the peep sights are enough for me.


    DSCF0254 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Past about 300 meters, I'll use a Trijicon ACOG, but there are hundreds or thousands of options to choose from. Modern AR-15's typically have a MIL-STD-1913 rail machined into the upper receiver to accommodate all kinds of accessory attachments.


    DSCF0249 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    What a neat little rifle. The AR-15 can be had in the US very inexpensively and nearly everyone with more than a few rifles has one of one kind of another. Entire sites, aftermarkets, and other satellite industries are built around the rifle, worth an estimated 300 million dollars annually, not including rifle manufacturers or state manufacturing contracts.

  • #2
    ************************************************** ****

    Sadly, toys we will never be able own in Australia !!!

    The Black Rifle.



    Thanks...



    ************************************************** ******

    Comment


    • Greenwich-biker
      Greenwich-biker commented
      Editing a comment
      Apparently. we DO have them here in limited numbers.

      Thanks Chazbot - that was a great photographic tour around your AR 15. When I look at that I see beauty, when those in control look at it, they see evil

    • Shooting Sports
      Shooting Sports commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Maverick" post=13348
      ************************************************** ****

      Sadly, toys we will never be able own in Australia !!!

      The Black Rifle.



      Thanks...


      Never say Never!
      My AR-15

  • #3
    Why on earth would I want a tacticool heaps of fun great to shoot AR when I have my slow arse bolt guns

    Comment


    • #4
      I like mine. It's very practical.

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PATHFilmsNZ

      Comment


      • Tornado-Technologies
        Tornado-Technologies commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by PATHfilmsNZ" post=18179
        I like mine. It's very practical.

        ELCAN SpecterDR - nice!

    • #5
      When I saw this thread and the pictures, I thought "how the devil did you get that you lucky bastard?!" Then saw you're in Cali, Chazbot :P Are you, and also you Couch Commando, guys from Shooters Loft?



      Must get back to posting there, haven't spent much time there in ages.

      Also, that 11.5 inch barrel must have some absolutely biblical noise and blast to it!
      Self-admitted armchair expert.

      Or rather, I spend way too much time googling and researching shooting related topics, and not enough time shooting.

      Comment


      • chazbot
        chazbot commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by The Hydra" post=99731
        When I saw this thread and the pictures, I thought "how the devil did you get that you lucky bastard?!" Then saw you're in Cali, Chazbot :P Are you, and also you Couch Commando, guys from Shooters Loft?



        Must get back to posting there, haven't spent much time there in ages.

        Also, that 11.5 inch barrel must have some absolutely biblical noise and blast to it!
        Yes I'm in California, although I do some business with a vendor in Melbourne. The 11.5" produces significant noise and blast, but for the very large weight difference, the recoil is imperceptibly different. I do notice that I often have some damaged brass though on extraction. I'll liking purchase a heavier recoil buffer and see if that balances the action better than the light carbine buffer I have now.

        For something truly obnoxious at the bench, a friend of mine has a 7.5" AR "pistol" with a KX3 muzzle device that ostensibly increases blast significantly. He has demonstrated that his pistol can break wine glasses at 5 yards from concussion alone.

    • #6
      My ARs. . .

      A little outdated, but best pic I have access to right now.

      Left to right

      DDM4 V5 with Aimpoint T-1, DD Fixed front and ARMS #40L rear, Surefire X300 Ultra (gun sold to buddy recently)

      BCM Lightweight Middy with Aimpoint T-1, ARMS #40 rear, Surefire G2X Tactical

      LMT MRP Rifle Length with Aimpoint Comp M4s, DD Fixed front and rear, Surefire X300

      Comment


      • S12A
        S12A commented
        Editing a comment
        nice well put together rifles there Drck, looks like a good choice of quality components.

    • #7
      I have used a LMT MRP and they would have to be my fav AR i have handled to date . very nice stack you have there

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Single Hit Armaments" post=105124
        I have used a LMT MRP and they would have to be my fav AR i have handled to date . very nice stack you have there
        Thanks mate!

        I like the MRP and think it's a solid gun, but it's pretty heavy, at least compared to other ARs. I mean ARs aren't that heavy in general, but after a few hours of shooting, I've noticed it for sure.

        What have you done with your MRP? Optic? Irons?
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