Need help with entry level 22rimfire competitions

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  • Need help with entry level 22rimfire competitions

    Good day all, I'm thinking of joining the SSAA and entering in some rimfire competitions. The SSAA website does a terrible job of explaining the classes and the properly equipped rifles required. Is benchrest with or without a scope?
    If anyone has the time or the generosity to explain to me the classes and the rifle requirements for each class, I know I'm asking a lot, I would appreciate it.
    Is there entry level benchrest? How expensive is this sport outside of the rifle? What's the least expensive rifle I can use for benchrest and stil get a decent result?
    Should I just leave you guys alone, and ring up the local SSAA club?
    Thank you all for your time

  • #2
    Quite interested also, I think i'm at the point where I wouldn't make a complete ass of a target now

    Here's the rulebook from the SSAA that I did find. At least I know my rifle is compliant!

    http://www.ssaa.org.au/competition-info/rulebook/benchrest-rulebook.pdf

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    • #3
      I'm sure someone will give you a detailed run down but better still contact your local range and get a calendar of the shooting competitions so you can arrive before a match and introduce yourself and actually see whats involved in the match, equipment used etc. Don't stand in the corner and say nothing, if you let people know your interested there's bound to be someone who's willing to have a chat with you and show you their equipment. Don't try and start a conversation in the middle of the match though so your not interrupting the shooters concentration.

      Benchrest can become a bit of an 'arms race' and requires some additional equipment not necessarily required for other competitions and so can be expensive depending on how competitive you would like to be.

      Other 22 competitions you can try are field rifle, 3p/4p, lever action and silhouette.

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      • #4
        If you have a look at the back of the Australian Sporting Shooter (the free monthly mag you get with your SSAA membership) you'll see a bunch of Postal competitions. There is 22 pistol, air rifle, black powder, 22 rifle and more. Each comp mentions the rule book it is shot under.

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        • #5
          Rimfire bench rest is shot with scoped rifles at 50m. There is hunter class which may suit you more as its shot with max 6X scope (you can dial a variable scope down to 6x for comps) and is much more suited to factory .22's, small bore rifle is shot with sights and is shot prone with a sling.

          Have a look at the SSAA poster for BR but really you want to get down to the range when a match is on and watch what goes on. It's fascinating to watch the good shooters.

          Steve

          http://www.ssaa.org.au/competition-info/posters/benchrest.pdf

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          • Guest's Avatar
            Guest commented
            Editing a comment
            If you go to a match, take a set of binoculars, you will be able to see the shots on target. Will add a bit of interest watching the shooter in action. NBT

        • #6
          Gidday Koolman,
          I agree with what said here the best way is to head out to the range and have a go, I first shot BR (benchrest) with my Bruno .22 with a 12 power scope it was competition against the custom boys and I was massively under gunned but it was great fun and I am still turning up every week. Benchrest is shot over 50 and 100 yards (or metres at some ranges) there are 3 popular disciplines, 1) Hunter 2) Group 3) IRB. Hunter you have 6 targets on a page including one sighter, you can shoot the sighter as many time as you want but only one shot on each scoring target.

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          then group where you have a sighter target at the bottom and scoring target above, use the sighter as often as you want but only 5 shots on the scoring target, the aim is to get these as close together as possible, one hole is best;0)

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          Then IRB where you have sighter targets down each side and 25 scoring targets, only one shot per scoring target here also.


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          In formal competition you need to comply with the rules as far as your rifle goes, and someone has posted them here. But basically there is weight, heavy and light, scope power 6x or unlimited, and then fore stock width which is 2 1/4 inch for light and 3inch for heavy. For a club comps most will let you shoot with whatever you have already, then you can work on what you want to buy as you go along, basic competitive rimfire rifles start from about $1,000 and go up to as much as $10,000 but some compete with off the shelf hunting rifles and have a great time.
          Go out and have a shot, the worst that can happen is you beat someone who has been shooting for years!! ;0)

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          • #7
            Gidday Koolman,
            I agree with what said here the best way is to head out to the range and have a go, I first shot BR (benchrest) with my Bruno .22 with a 12 power scope it was competition against the custom boys and I was massively under gunned but it was great fun and I am still turning up every week. Benchrest is shot over 50 and 100 yards (or metres at some ranges) there are 3 popular disciplines, 1) Hunter 2) Group 3) IRB. Hunter you have 6 targets on a page including one sighter, you can shoot the sighter as many time as you want but only one shot on each scoring target.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	HunterTargets.jpg
Views:	0
Size:	40.1 KB
ID:	30900

            then group where you have a sighter target at the bottom and scoring target above, use the sighter as often as you want but only 5 shots on the scoring target, the aim is to get these as close together as possible, one hole is best;0)

            Click image for larger version

Name:	Grouptargets.jpg
Views:	0
Size:	39.9 KB
ID:	30901
            Then IRB where you have sighter targets down each side and 25 scoring targets, only one shot per scoring target here also.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	IRBTarget.jpg
Views:	0
Size:	52.8 KB
ID:	30902

            In formal competition you need to comply with the rules as far as your rifle goes, and someone has posted them here. But basically there is weight, heavy and light, scope power 6x or unlimited, and then fore stock width which is 2 1/4 inch for light and 3inch for heavy. For a club comps most will let you shoot with whatever you have already, then you can work on what you want to buy as you go along, basic competitive rimfire rifles start from about $1,000 and go up to as much as $10,000 but some compete with off the shelf hunting rifles and have a great time.
            Go out and have a shot, the worst that can happen is you beat someone who has been shooting for years!! ;0)

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            • #8
              Rimfire benchrest we shoot at 50 and 100 m five shot groups three targets at fifty and three targets at 100 scored at distance between the centres of two furtherest apart shots measured in inches then added up for a total of fifty and hundred some voodoo calculation that gives both fifty and hundred aggregates then a grand aggregate which is your final score .
              Rimfire Hunter class is chasing bulls eyes ,fifteen targets at fifty and one hundred , One shot on each target only scored x if dot in middle of bullseye is taken out or ten if touching any part of line of ten ring. Then 9,8,7,6 etc best edge scoring 10.01 if X. The guys shoot 300.15 sometimes and the winning is done in the point score (ie 300.12 ,300.14 etc)
              Also the target that I like the best is the SSAA international rimfire target which consists of twenty five small targets ten cent sized to 7 ring so small three target sheets.
              Scored out of 250 . Xs 250.25 max score per target.

              This is SSAA Benchrest but there is also TRA and RBA targets as well. I have found this great fun and have meet some really decent blokes shooting it we have a tuesday night club meet every second tuesday at Belmont Range. The fun is in pushing yourself to do better each time and chasing those bulls eyes can be addictive. When I first went along I shot like one and a half inch groups at fifty and three or four inch groups at one hundred. The guys there helped me out with good advice and after around seven months I have shot a 0.3 inch group at fifty and 0.4 inch group at one hundred I can sometimes put three bullets in same hole sometimes four at fifty but I can never put that last one in but thats what keeps me coming back its a challenge .
              Hope this helps kind regards Ben

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              • #9
                We both posted at same time though Dan did a much better job , see benchrest guys are very helpful.

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                • #10
                  Never despair about your Bruno Bunny Gun.
                  I saw a woman shooter ( Bench Rest ) clean up some of the best using her Bruno SS plastic stock Bunny Gun and possibly under 12 X Scope as well.
                  Was a hundred meter target and good well lit and calm day and she blitzed 50 odd shooters with some rifles that looked like a star wars clone and but hooks and all sorts of fancy gidgets and some of the best Annies as well.
                  Brunos always were good and probably still are -- the skill level is what sets apart the shooters who use them and win :P
                  It was hilarious as I had a good day as well with an old Martini HB ( BSA international ) -- really was a nose bending day for some of those top shooters
                  [center]
                  Don’t poke the snake, walk around it and come back later with a double-barrelled shotgun and blow its [email protected]#!ing head off!.

                  Australia in future, the outcome is the same, a bloody dictatorship run on the whims of a very few ego-centric pathological elitists.

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                  • danandria
                    danandria commented
                    Editing a comment
                    No despair here! I love my Brno its shot a .3 something out of the box the first time out and it is good fun, I also agree with the Jet repeatable accuracy at the next level requires the next level rifle, not to mention rests and ammo. I now shoot an old Annie 54 in a Macmillan stock and it works very well but just not good to compete with the big boys like Russell Gibson who at Warwick on Sunday shot a 0.137" at 100 a pending new Australian record!

                • #11
                  Comes a point where the rifles accuracy and repeatability comes into play though. The best in the country arent shooting CZs if they are they are modified past recognition .The nut behind the butt still has a lot to do with it thats for sure. But the bench guns are just stable.

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                  • #12
                    Koolman, the lads above are talking about measuring and weighing your .22 rimfire ammo, the best expensive ammo is the most consistent but even then can vary a little which effects accuracy, so shooters sort their ammo by rim thickness a number of different ways, the reason is that the primer paper inside the case can vary and this is held in place by the rim of the case, so a thicker rim can indicate thicker primer paper which might mean faster ignition if you sort them all it minimises this. Next step if your keen enough is to weight each round, this sounds crazy but every now and then you will find one that is just way over or under, I reckon these weird ones explain 'flyers' and one very well known shooter had a flyer at the nationals last Sunday, he had a very tight group then one shot went crack louder than most and hit about 30mm higher than the rest. I asked him and he didn't weigh his ammo. A weight variation usually means a powder variation. We are getting pretty detailed here but sorting your ammo will help a lot regardless of what rifle you are using. If you are gonna spend the time shooting spend the time sorting, it will pay off.

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                    • Guest's Avatar
                      Guest commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Originally posted by danandria" post=15324
                      Koolman, the lads above are talking about measuring and weighing your .22 rimfire ammo, the best expensive ammo is the most consistent but even then can vary a little which effects accuracy, so shooters sort their ammo by rim thickness a number of different ways, the reason is that the primer paper inside the case can vary and this is held in place by the rim of the case, so a thicker rim can indicate thicker primer paper which might mean faster ignition if you sort them all it minimises this. Next step if your keen enough is to weight each round, this sounds crazy but every now and then you will find one that is just way over or under, I reckon these weird ones explain 'flyers' and one very well known shooter had a flyer at the nationals last Sunday, he had a very tight group then one shot went crack louder than most and hit about 30mm higher than the rest. I asked him and he didn't weigh his ammo. A weight variation usually means a powder variation. We are getting pretty detailed here but sorting your ammo will help a lot regardless of what rifle you are using. If you are gonna spend the time shooting spend the time sorting, it will pay off.
                      never heard about primer paper, my understanding is that a drop or primer paste is deposited into the rimfire case then spun and centrifical force pushes the paste out into the rim where it dries and is crushed and ignited when the firing pin strikes the rim

                      i'm sure there's a vid somewhere about it

                      steve

                  • #13
                    Wow, you guys are all great! Thank you all so much for all of the incredibly helpful info.
                    This competition shooting sounds like it could be a very large MONSTER!! What am I getting myself into!!
                    But you know what fellas, I think I'm hearing the call. I don't know if I"ll be any good at it, but I think it would be a fair bit of fun to find out.
                    Thank you all, again, for being such good forum mates.
                    Cheers

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