Rossi Circuit judge, are they cat b legal nsw?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rossi Circuit judge, are they cat b legal nsw?

    Just saw them on the shop not to be named's website are they legal in NSW?
    Polish Mosin Nagant M44 7.62x54r Radom 1952 manufacture
    Brno model 2 1974 manufacture

    One word 'Timshel'.

  • #2
    i believe that is a no but the guys from NSW should be able to confirm or give FAR a ring.

    Regard
    Matt Strahan
    Single Hit Armaments

    Comment


    • #3
      What are people's thoughts on these? They any good as far as accuracy/reliability? Saw a .22 LR/WMR the other day on used guns and it got me thinking..

      Comment


      • BlueBikesBlackGuns
        BlueBikesBlackGuns commented
        Editing a comment
        The should be Cat R IMO. with R standing for rubbish.

        Just one opinion tho maybe see what some others think.

    • #4
      Doesn't matter i there rubbish or good can't get them in NSW

      Comment


      • #5
        Not in NSW but do recall reading they are not allowed, was either the action type or length that was the problem.

        I have one of the 22 ones. It's a fun plinker. Build quality isn't great and the plastic stock didn't last long before splitting but the importer was great and swapped the stock for me. Haven't had a chance to take it out to the property much since then though to see if this stock survives or splits again in the same spot.

        Comment


        • Guest's Avatar
          Guest commented
          Editing a comment
          Yeah, at present revolving rifles are specifically prohibited in the Act (seems there were fears in the past that the Ubertis and Amy Jagers, which are specifically mentioned by name in the legislation, could be too-easily hacked down to pistol length) however the SFP proposed some amendments to the act a few years ago (which is currently under review) which would see these made legal. I believe that these proposals are indeed before Parliament however are stuck somewhere in the logjam of legislation that is currently awaiting tabling.

      • #6
        Moved from WELCOME MAT :lol: :lol: :lol: to Rifles/centerfire.

        Yes I know its not exactly the right spot being in this category.
        But with the many variations of this rifle I think it will do.

        JH

        Comment


        • #7
          As has been mentioned, the NSW FAR will not issue a registration certificate for a revolving rifle.

          No great loss really. I think they are poor design with marginal functionality. In the looks department, they are an "acquired taste".

          Much better options are available with no legal issues. How about a nice Browning or Miroku 22 lever?

          Comment


          • Guest's Avatar
            Guest commented
            Editing a comment
            Originally posted by Stan 66" post=43398
            As has been mentioned, the NSW FAR will not issue a registration certificate for a revolving rifle.

            No great loss really. I think they are poor design with marginal functionality. In the looks department, they are an "acquired taste".

            Much better options are available with no legal issues. How about a nice Browning or Miroku 22 lever?
            Yep, agree with you there. I suspect that their popularity is simply a desperation some people have for the semi-auto experience; possibly the same reason why people trick out Remington 7615s to look like ARs; you always want what you can't have.

            I had a crack at one of these Rossis when I was up in Qld for a shoot earlier in the year (it was the .22 rimfire version, however I suspect not that much different to the .410/.45LC variety in regards to it's handling, operation and trigger) and the double-action trigger on that thing was horrible; heavy, tons of creep and not conducive to accuracy at all and nothing like plinking with a Ruger 10/22 (which I owned back in the day). It seemed to group alright on single-action given the ordinary sights however I suspect that the double action trigger-pull is simply for a bit of "spray & pray" fun; to be fair though, I have been told that a good smith can work on the triggers of these things and achieve some pretty good double-action results with regards to pull weight and creep, so all is not lost if you do buy one where legal.

            As previously mentioned, if you want a rifle that you can really pop the rounds out of at a rapid pace then a Miroku/Browning BL/ML22 is the way to go. With their short lever-throw (you keep your thumb on the stock and simply flick the lever forward with your fingertips) and trigger-group that is attached to the lever you can rack the rounds off almost as fast as a semi-auto; was having a play with mine recently and I loaded up the tube mag with 22x CB shorts, and squeezed out the lot in 16 seconds flat (could probably do it faster still with a little practice).

          • Omega_Rifles
            Omega_Rifles commented
            Editing a comment
            Originally posted by Stan 66" post=43398
            As has been mentioned, the NSW FAR will not issue a registration certificate for a revolving rifle.

            No great loss really. I think they are poor design with marginal functionality. In the looks department, they are an "acquired taste".
            No great loss with not being able to own revolving rifles in NSW now you say ( reffering to the rossi circuit judge )

            But it might be a different tune if there ever is a better revolving rifle made in the future ..and up here in QLD we can buy that one to if it ever gets made :lol:

        • #8
          They do seem to be kinda crap, but I wouldn't mind some Aussie inspired or produced S&W revolving carbines... It is something we could take up before we lose our jobs making ,.,. American cars.

          Comment

          Working...
          X