Barrel fluting at a later stage?

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  • Barrel fluting at a later stage?

    I'm not sure if this is where to post it or rather the Gunsmithing section.

    I have a Tikka Varmint which shoots exceptionally well but would like to reduce its weight. A gunsmith has said that fluting is done during manufacture because of the stress relieving process, which sounds logical but I know plenty of barrels have been done at a later stage.

    I am worried that it may upset the harmonics and have a negative affect on performance.
    Has anyone experienced a drop in accuracy after having a barrel fluted?
    Also any recommendations for a smith who can do this plus flute bolt bodies would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    "Well he should've armed himself" - Unforgiven.

  • #2
    Originally posted by silhouette" post=25448
    I'm not sure if this is where to post it or rather the Gunsmithing section.

    I have a Tikka Varmint which shoots exceptionally well but would like to reduce its weight. A gunsmith has said that fluting is done during manufacture because of the stress relieving process, which sounds logical but I know plenty of barrels have been done at a later stage.

    I am worried that it may upset the harmonics and have a negative affect on performance.
    Has anyone experienced a drop in accuracy after having a barrel fluted?
    Also any recommendations for a smith who can do this plus flute bolt bodies would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    You will be fine having your barrel fluted.

    Thanks,

    Oddball

    Comment


    • adamjp
      adamjp commented
      Editing a comment
      Fluting a barrel can happen before, or after the rifling is done. Broached barrels do it after, button before, hammer forged after. It does slightly stress relieve the bore, and in some cases might alter the internal dimension of the barrel.

      I did a fair it of reading on this a couple of years back and the general consensus was - I might make a difference, but probably won't.

      There were the usual horror stories, and many other stories that went something like "different load, same accuracy, lighter barrel".

      Just do it.

  • #3
    The harmonics would change a bit but I think the main concern is that the bore diameter could get larger where the flutes are. Having said that I believe Rezon8 fluted his factory barrel without incident.

    fluting doesn't save that much weight though - maybe 100 grams or so.

    Comment


    • #4
      rezon8 had a big thread on another forum showing his tikka varmint with a fluted barrel he did himself. i think he may have shortened the barrel also. i'm not convinced there's a lot of weight to be saved by fluting, maybe 100gr but why not!

      heres a pic and a link from the show us your tikka thread

      steve

      http://shootingaustralia.net/forum/rifles-bolt-action-centre-fire/1408-tikka-owners-show-us-your-kit


      jhonvdp has fluted his own bolt but had issues with the legalities of fluting bolts for other owners. rifle pic and forum member can be found here
      http://shootingaustralia.net/forum/rifles-bolt-action-centre-fire/2313-saw-a-tikka-on-the-forums-ages-ago-can-someone-identify-it-and-its-specs


      hope they don't mind me posting their pics

      steve

      Comment


      • #5
        You'd be lucky if you saved 100grams.... I personally think weight saving for fluting is negligible (on standard length barrels)... The cooling side is a bigger advantage in my opinion....
        I throw sub-moa rocks

        If you heard the shot, you weren't the target

        Comment


        • #6
          Just leave it It makes no real gain other than the look . Its not broken so dont fix it

          Comment


          • #7
            It sounds like it might be worth a try. I only actually have to lose about 150gms to make this gun within competition weight limits . 50mm off the length equals about 90-100gms so fluting should put me well under .
            Thanks
            "Well he should've armed himself" - Unforgiven.

            Comment


            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              Originally posted by silhouette" post=25536
              It sounds like it might be worth a try. I only actually have to lose about 150gms to make this gun within competition weight limits . 50mm off the length equals about 90-100gms so fluting should put me well under .
              Thanks
              You can use the PAC nor calculator to estimate savings

              http://pac-nor.com/cgi-bin/pnb/bweight.cgi

              Tip for the silhouette shooters: don't buy a varmint barrelled rifle

              Steve

          • #8
            Hi All,

            As far as I am aware you can flute a barrel after manufacture. There are plenty of companies in the States that are happy to do this for you. I'm not too sure about here in Oz, mainly because I did mine myself.

            I went ahead and did it because I have over 36 years experience as a Fitter and Turner, and I have machined just about every material from titanium to sand.

            Originally I had planed to do the machining in a high speed machining centre, but due to work commitments, I ended up doing the machining in a manual Bridgeport mill with a dividing head.

            I used plenty of coolant to reduce any possibility of heat build up, took multiple shallow cuts evenly around the barrel and used a special TiCn coated carbide cutter that is specifically graded for tougher materials. But, most importantly, I took my time.

            To be honest, the weight saving is minimal, maybe 50-60 grams. Shortening the barrel from 23” to 20” made the next biggest gain at around 120grams.

            The biggest weight saving gain for me was scope choice, by choosing the right scope I was able to save nearly 300 grams.

            Then I went and put a GRS stock and a VX3 Leupold on it which made it overweight again. So for comps I need to down grade the scope again to a VX2.

            I hear you Steve, before I did the fluting and shortened my barrel, I got my T3 Varmint into Hunter Class in the 2012 Nationals in Vic by using the alloy mounts supplied and a Vx2. Made it in by 23 grams.

            Comment


            • #9
              If you are doing this to get it into hunter class, then it will not be eligible due to it not being as per factory issue. If it's for silhouette class then go nuts.

              Comment


              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                I saved a lot of weight recently by putting my 2-7x33 Leupold back on instead of the Simmons WT, and there is a lot of weight in the stock that a sander could get rid of, maybe that before all the work of fluting.
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