The complete low down on Remington 700 actions

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  • The complete low down on Remington 700 actions

    ...........is not something I have


    ..........or can find on the international forums



    ..........so, is it possible for those knowledgeable among us, to give us the holy grail of Remington 700 Action differences? i.e which actions are the same, are any mods performed on certain bolts, receivers, pins, lugs etc..

    This would certainly be the dogs nuts for me
    Do not pass GO. Do not collect $200.

  • #2
    Ok, some definitive advice on Rem 700 actions. It was introduced in 1962, an update of the older Remington 721 design.

    Two sizes. Long, and Short.

    Short action is available ex-factory in four different boltface configurations.
    • 17 Rem/222/223/204/221/300AAC aka 223
    • 6.8 SPC aka SPC
    • 22/250/243/260/7-08/308 aka 308
    • SAUM/WSM aka Magnum

    Long action is available ex-factory in three different boltface configurations
    • 25-06/270/280/30-06/35 Whelen/257 Roberts/8x57 aka 308 or 30/06
    • 7mm Rem Mag/300 Win Mag/338 Win Mag/8mm Rem Mag/375 H&H/7mm-300-338 RUM aka Magnum
    • 338 Lapua Magnum aka 338 Lap


    All extractors are the little clip extractor EXCEPT on the 338 Lap

    All ejectors are the plunger style ejector.

    All bolt bodies are made from three pieces high-temp soldered together. Bolt head, bolt body, bolt handle.

    All triggers interchange.

    All two piece scope bases interchange.

    All barrels interchange. Barrel thread is 1.0625in x 16TPI.

    All recoil lugs interchange. .185in thick standard.

    A barrel will fit from one action to the other, but headspace may not be within tolerance.

    Magazine boxes are built to suit the cartridge, varying in length, pitch and width to ensure correct feeding. The magazine follower can be tricky with how it interacts with the magazine spring and feeding problems should be sorted here first.

    The actions are made from one of two metals, CrMo and Stainless. Ti actions were offered, but are no longer available. The Ti action had a CrMo insert that the barrel screwed into and the bolt locked up into.

    Actions are made in left and right handed configurations, however Remington is not making LH stainless actions at this time.

    There is no internal difference between a cheap ass SPS and a premium factory custom shop rifle. The more money gets a better fit of stock (when in wood), better finish on all surfaces (including a lusterous blue if you want it) but does not include basic truing activities like facing the action square.

    The Rem 700 action is made from an extruded piece of steel that is cut to length by a drop saw. Yes, a drop saw.

    The Remington 40x action is based upon a Rem700, but should not be considered the same thing. The 40x is available as a 22LR and also in a solid bottom to act as a single shot. The 40x is only available from the custom shop and is the ONLY Rem 700 type rifle made by Remington that is squared up before assembly. The trigger on a 40x is different to that supplied on a Rem 700 (it is far better).

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by adamjp" post=22500
      All bolt bodies are made from three pieces high-temp soldered together. Bolt head, bolt body, bolt handle.
      Just to bring up one minor detail, they're made from 5 pieces; the three you mentioned, plus there's a metal pin joining the bolt head and bolt tube, just in case the braze fails, and there's also a hardened steel washer, brazed in place and captive, to take the firing pin blow.

      Originally posted by adamjp" post=25252
      You can always tell a hammer forged barrel by the radial manufacturing marks on it. This is impossible with broached or buttoned barrels.
      That isn't strictly true. The video in question shows an unlapped barrel. Broached, cut or button rifled, they're going to have radial marks because a hole has to be drilled. Lapping the barrel is to get the correct surface finish and remove imperfections inherent with the manufacturing process. I've got a few hammer forged barrels which don't look anything like the one in the video (i do have a borescope). Base model R700 barrels are just going to be made as cheap as possible, so the lapping step doesn't make it.

  • #3
    Same manufacturing tolerances are used on all 700 actions across the 700 models, some models have will additional drilled holes to permit peep sights and materials can vary stainless, steel or titanium other than that only the quality of finish differs between 700 models. Also just so you are aware when sourcing actions pre 82 actions will have a bolt stop slot machined on the safety side of the action for the older style walker triggers with a bolt stop this was discontinued due to safety concerns so post 82 rifles could be unloaded while the safety is still applied.

    the following is borrowed from another forum, thanks to the original poster.

    The Rem 700 and 40X triggers are the same in design, with the exception of one area. The lower front screw on a 700, where the pull weight is adjusted, is not tapped, but rather, enlarged so that a small steel ball is dropped down inside and it sits on the spring that controls the pull weight. The bottom of the forward spacer block (sandwiched between the side plates) which sits in front of the trigger - has a hole tapped in it so that an extended adjustment screw reaches down in front of the trigger and is accessible from the outside of the rifle. The tip of this adjustment screw is tapered and is positioned so that the taper comes up behind the ball. By turning the screw in - the taper pushes the ball against the spring - adding weight to the pull.
    The other difference is the springs used - the 40X triggers have a factory recommended adjustment of 1-1/4lbs to 3-1/2lbs. On certain 40X's - there is a 2 oz trigger option - these are the same triggers, with different springs installed.
    An additional note - M24 sniper rifles use yet another trigger. The M24 triggers are built with a different rear spacer block (between the side plates) This block has an extension that protrudes out the back. On the bottom of this extension, there is a seat or pocket machined into it and corresponding to the location and geometry - the trigger has a set screw installed through the finger pad - this set screw has a guide on the end which holds the spring in place. The other end of the spring sits in the pocket of the extension. This is how the pull weight is accomplished on an M24.

    Comment


    • #4
      Following on from my last.

      Common accuracy modifications to these actions include (in order of value for money - highest to lowest)
      • Squaring off the face of the action perpendicular to the action centre.
      • Lapping the bolt locking lugs
      • Squaring off the bolt locking lugs (only really valuable if you are doing a multi-bolt rifle that won't work with lapped lugs)
      • Chasing the action thread with a captive tap.
      • Squaring the boltface with the bolt body.
      • Re-cutting the action thread with a single point cutter.


      Things that you might get done to the bolt include
      • Fitting a bolt knob
      • Reducing pressure on the ejector to stop cases being thrown quite so far (or hanging up in the action like BR cases will with a stiff ejector)
      • Having the boltface adjusted for a new cartridge. It is very easy to open the boltface of a 223 Rem700 to work with a 308 cartridge. It is also possible, but a little more tricky to close a boltface down from 308 to 223.
      • Fluting the bolt body/skeletonising the bolt handle.
      • Fitting a Sako or M16 extractor
      • Bushing the firing pin hole (smaller firing pin)
      • Widening the bolt body at the rear bridge
      • Adjusting the timing of extraction


      Good accessory items for the Rem700 include
      • For ultralight rifles, Talley Lightweight rings and aluminium bolt shrouds
      • For match rifles, a solid single piece scope mount
      • For all rifles, a lightweight firing pin assembly and replacement spring
      • For switchbarrel rifles, a pinned recoil lug

      Comment


      • #5
        Totally. Awesome.


        Thankyou for that comprehensive summary. It is precisely what I wanted to know, and have been searching for.
        Do not pass GO. Do not collect $200.

        Comment


        • #6
          When I did the Law Enforcement Armourers course I was told that all commercial Remington 700 receivers come off of the same machines, regardless of what model they're for. Different levels of finishing will be done depending on the model. Back in the day they all used to be vibrahoned, but that's not done these days.

          Comment


          • #7
            Wow that's alot of info ive never found in one spot before.

            So the only differences between basic sps up to mil spec is only the finish?

            So there is technically no reason why a milspec may be the better more accurate rifle than an sps out of the box? Yes it Amy last longer and feel smoother but not more accurate??

            Thanks again
            Marty
            "shoot straight shoot quick"
            Coonan 357 Magnum semi Auto- like shooting a laser!!!!!

            Comment


            • adamjp
              adamjp commented
              Editing a comment
              Originally posted by Martymonster" post=24892
              So there is technically no reason why a milspec may be the better more accurate rifle than an sps out of the box? Yes it Amy last longer and feel smoother but not more accurate??
              No there is no inherent difference in the action. The heavier barrel may make a difference to accuracy as the additional thickness will resist warping through heat less than the thinner barrel.

              The kicker is that a thinner barrel from a custom manufacturer will also be more accurate than the same weight barrel from the Remington hammer forging machine. It can often be that a sporter profile from Lilja, PacNor, etc. will be as accurate as a varmit profile from Remington. Sometimes they are more accurate. The additional weight in the factory varmit tube makes up for the lower quality control inherent in a factory barrel.

              I don't know this, but I suspect that the 5R barrels are not made by Remington. Similarly custom shop rifles are usually fitted with an aftermarket button rifled tube.

              If you want to see an interesting comparison of a quality button rifled tube and a Remington factory tube, check out the video on the Lilja homepage. http://www.riflebarrels.com/borescope_hi.asx

              You can always tell a hammer forged barrel by the radial manufacturing marks on it. This is impossible with broached or buttoned barrels.

            • Send-it
              Send-it commented
              Editing a comment
              Originally posted by Martymonster" post=24892
              So there is technically no reason why a milspec may be the better more accurate rifle than an sps out of the box?

              according to an agent of Krieger barrels......milspec 5r barrels are a Krieger barrel.
              dont see any reason to doubt it,..and it would make sense.
              we have a milspec 308 and the bore does look better than a sps barrel.

          • #8
            Every thread needs a few pics ..

            R700 Short (L) & Long action (R)



            R700 Bolt faces... 308 Win (L) & Magnum (R) ie 300 Win Mag/7mm Rem Mag/.375 H&H etc




            Edit: +1 on making this thread a sticky!

            Comment


            • #9
              I'm not convinced that R700 actions are all made to the same tolerance specs.

              Every 5R, Sendero, Police and CDL action I have cycled or shot with felt much better than the SPS actions.

              I suspect the tooling for more expensive Remington rifles are changed more often and tolerances and held to higher standards.

              The surface finish on more expensive Remington rifles also contributes to their smoother cycling and tighter lock up. The crappy matte blue on SPS and Tactical actions really grinds my gears.

              Overall though, adamjp has hit the nail on the head.
              Sometimes life gives you lambda points. Just chill, once the bubbling stops s'all good mate.

              Brotha's got spinners!

              Comment


              • adamjp
                adamjp commented
                Editing a comment
                Originally posted by Zero" post=25233
                I'm not convinced that R700 actions are all made to the same tolerance specs.

                Every 5R, Sendero, Police and CDL action I have cycled or shot with felt much better than the SPS actions.

                I suspect the tooling for more expensive Remington rifles are changed more often and tolerances and held to higher standards.

                The surface finish on more expensive Remington rifles also contributes to their smoother cycling and tighter lock up. The crappy matte blue on SPS and Tactical actions really grinds my gears.

                Overall though, adamjp has hit the nail on the head.
                It would be hard to change the tooling as all three mainline Remington actions (Rem 700 Long, Short and the Model Seven) are manufactured on the same production line.

                All actions are made and serial numbered, the bolts are made, the barrels are made (although some are brought in from a supplier), the three items are matched up. If the headspace is within spec, they go off together to be finished, if not, another bolt is swapped in to get headspace within spec. Then serial numbers are placed on the bolt and finishes are applied to the entire rifle. Ever wonder why the action serial number is roll stamped, but the bolt serial number is electro-pencilled or stamped with a hand stamp (depending on age)?

                The surface finish is the only real differentiator to internal dimensions, and after use that becomes less of a difference too.

                Like the difference between a Crummydore Taxi and a HSV, they are all the same metal underneath. Just the external finishes change.

                I too dislike the low-spec SPS rifles and it is difficult to explain to a starter at the rifle range why their >$1200 Remington SPS with Redfield scope is not very accurate. I've tried delicate words like, "the stock has flex in it", but have settled on "That PoS SPS stock is made from recycled garbage bags. Get a decent stock and accuracy will improve significantly." Same words apply to those Hogue stocks inflicted on Rugers and Howas.

            • #10
              well i know i can get a good deal on a rem700, 308 police model.
              are these mechanically any different from a normal 308 varmint rig, apart from barrel length?
              also, from those who own one, whats your thoughts of these?
              my intention with it is to be a long range hunting/target setup.

              Comment


              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                Originally posted by Send-it" post=38311
                well i know i can get a good deal on a rem700, 308 police model.
                are these mechanically any different from a normal 308 varmint rig, apart from barrel length?
                also, from those who own one, whats your thoughts of these?
                my intention with it is to be a long range hunting/target setup.
                Some will tell you they are the same some people will tell you different, I owned one of the first police .308's when they came out and it was a dead set tack driver it shot as good as any rifle from the box. The police rifles are supposedly checked and test fired to ensure they are delivering the accuracy expected by the intended customers i.e. LA agencies. Bottom line is I would not hesitate to buy one for your intended purpose from my experience in stock format with match ammo they will match anything that cost three or four times as much and is can be easily customized at a later stage if you so desire, that said I don't think much of the X mark trigger the old walkers are much better.

            • #11
              I recently got a 5R in 308 and it wont shoot for shit. I think the problem is excessive throat length. I checked the throat length with one of those Hornady gauges and found that the throat is so long that to get a bullet to touch the lands the projectile sits so far forward that it doesn't engage with the throat of the case. (Projectiles are 155gr Sierra with Lapua brass)

              Anyone else experienced this sort of thing? I should probably send the thing back but its so much rooting around with the cops (WA), and everything moves so slowly that I'm inclined to simply get it rebarreled. I'm really disappointed with this rifle as all I've ever heard are good reports and it seems that I've got a dud.....

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              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                Take her back and get it fixed !

                Thats my 2 cents

                JH

              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks to all that have offered their suggestions, views, etc. I've decided to take the rifle back to the dealer and go through the proper channels as many have suggested. I'll update when I find out more.

                cheers
                Bill

              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm thinking of getting a 5R and found this old thread - any update bugeye? I have only read good things about he 5R so this topic suprised me. I'm guessing the OP sorted it out...

            • #12
              have you explored other reasons for the inaccuracy?
              such as try another scope,check all scope mounts, bed the action etc?

              Comment


              • Walter White
                Walter White commented
                Editing a comment
                Its not uncommon on factory rifles to have a fairly long throat. I've got a Sako and a Marlin xs7 both of which shoot well with long jumps. In excess of 120thou in some cases. What level of accuracy are you getting? How many rounds have you sent down the tube so far? I've heard the 5r barrel can take a few rounds to settle in. Have you tried different ammo? A rebarrel is pretty drastic. The barrel could be setback to shorten the throat up I would imagine. I hope its not something serious it sucks having a new gun that won't perform.

              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                Yes, I've checked mounts and tried different scopes. Factory bedding is very good on these rifles but I've had it appart to check for deficiencies and ensure barrel is properly floating.
                cheers
                Bill
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