H&K SP89

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  • H&K SP89

    Well, it is legally a pistol although it's awful large for one. The SP89 was H&K's last attempt to "civilianize" one of their military weapons that was a pistol. Made semiautomatic only by the same rules that allowed importation of the HK90 series, the SP89 was able to be imported for a few years before the furor of 'assault rifles' became the furor of 'assault weapons.'


    DSCF0389 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The SP89 was banned from further importation by name in a Clinton executive order in 1993. As with most of the HK90 series, all are still available as collector's items, commanding premium prices. Politicians who saw no difference in the SP89 and TEC-9 for collector interest could care less.


    DSCF0390 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    For a gun that originally sold at about $900, the SP89 commands prices in the range of $4000 and are sometimes seen converted to the PDW format for another thousand or so.

    With the name "Sport Pistole of 1989", the SP89 is largely identical to its military counterpart, the MP5K. It differs in a few ways though, which I will go into detail below.

    The SP89 is a roller delayed blowback 9x19mm "pistol" with diopter rear sight, fixed front sight, and offers compatibility with a variety of magazines, with a 15 round one from the factory. The trigger pack is held in place with a single pin and can be exchanged with similar ones for different grips or other setups, including full auto adaptations.


    DSCF0391 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Much like the other G3 and CETME based weapons from H&K, the receiver is stamped steel with milled steel components either welded in place or carefully fitted and pinned. It is meant for inexpensive, quick production, and is quite accurate and robust, working with a wide variety of ammunition.

    The rear sight is noticeably older than the rest of the pistol, and aging has turned it a plum color for some reason. I have an HK93 that has a similar "problem". Not sure what has caused it. It is made of milled steel that is welded to the receiver prior to bending the receiver into shape.


    DSCF0397 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The original barrel was 5" in length with a shroud that I personally found very dangerous as it was so short and the handguard designed in such a way that it would be very easy to forget yourself and slip your hand in front of the muzzle. I have since replaced the barrel for a 3 lugged 6" barrel for an upcoming PDW conversion and have installed the MP5K vertical foregrip.


    DSCF0393 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The magazine is a little odd in that the follower, spring, and floorplate locking piece are orthagonal and have a distinct front and rear. The spring snaps into the locking piece and the follower has a stud that fits between two leaves of the spring to hold things together. The floorplate itself can be installed in either direction.


    DSCF0392 by chazbotic, on Flickr


    DSCF0400 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    My SP89 came with two 15 round magazines and one 30 round magazine, all three are date coded for 1985. I believe that existing supplies of certain items, like the magazines, were simply packaged with the pistol for general sale.

    Much like other MP5 rifles and submachineguns, the SP89 is held with cross pins. Two here at the rear holds the lower and receiver plate in place. These are extremely tight and I require a few taps with a hammer and punch to unseat the upper pin due to tension from the recoil spring.


    DSCF0394 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Once the lower is removed, you can see the semi-automatic shelf that prevents the easy installation of automatic trigger packs. Not all semi-autos were imported with this shelf and some very early ones (the HK40 series notably) are push pin, meaning a simple lower swap will restore automatic modes of fire.


    DSCF0403 by chazbotic, on Flickr


    DSCF0402 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    You can see here the complete removal of the sear trip pin. I won't take apart the trigger pack because it is a little time consuming to reassemble.


    DSCF0404 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The plastic ergonomic grip is held to the lower pack with a simple screw and washer.


    DSCF0405 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Of note is the free floated barrel. Few seem to realize that the barrel has the "triple frame" front sight tower welded to it, but this frame does not touch the cocking tube at all, the handguard attaches to the cocking tube via a hanger and pin, making the barrel free floating.


    DSCF0395 by chazbotic, on Flickr


    DSCF0396 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here is the bolt carrier assembly apart. Very similar to the rifles and a little bit for the P9 pistol. There are several versions of the locking piece for each model and something like 50 for the entire family. These are selected and tuned based on ammunition used. Mine is number 16, and is typical of the short MP5K.


    DSCF0398 by chazbotic, on Flickr


    DSCF0401 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The disassembled SP89 and major components laid out for cleaning and inspection. I am inside this time because it is rather cold outside.


    DSCF0406 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The SP89 is a neat pistol, and certainly gets a lot of looks thanks to media hype and exposure and a long record of excellent performance for the money. I'll photograph my PDW conversion once it's finished as well, which will feature a folding stock and a slightly different lower.

    Because of the high mass of the pistol, and the relatively soft recoil of the 9x19, the SP89 is extremely accurate and has easy capacity for follow up shots. The 6" barrel slings 147gr bullets out to the 200 with 100% hits on an 8" steel plate without any troubles. Using the rear diopter is quick and easy. Once the "2" rear sight is calibrated at the 50 meter line, you will have cross over at the 75 meter mark. The other numbers do NOT indicate different ranges, but on the MP5K they are merely there to provide different sight pictures depending on the stock that is installed (folding, collapsing, fixed, and none). My rear sight is a modified rifle sight and has a V notch for 100 meter targets.

    While the SP89 can be quite dirty, it's made in such a way that it's difficult for uncleanliness to result in failures. Extraction is positive and violent, with brass being fling well over a meter. A port buffer is install on mine (note the two rivets near the ejection port) that will help control ejection. Another variant of the MP5 is the HK94, which came with a genuine 4 aperture rear diopter sight for different ranges. Numerous companies make a huge business in manufacturing clones of these sorts of weapons, and the aftermarket is quite large too.

  • #2
    Thanks for the thread chazbot. Always enjoy the detail. That's a fine pistol you got there. I've always wondered if your hand warms up on the fore grip? Cheers slo

    Comment


    • chazbot
      chazbot commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Slo355" post=41272
      Thanks for the thread chazbot. Always enjoy the detail. That's a fine pistol you got there. I've always wondered if your hand warms up on the fore grip? Cheers slo
      Enough to notice, but not really. the air volume is significant under there.

  • #3
    Very nice mate, keen to see the PDW conversion once it's finished.
    “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing” - Edmund Burke

    Comment


    • #4
      Great gun, would very much love to own one in the future.

      Any chance of being able to get one in Australia?
      Always in need of just one more gun.

      Comment


      • Tornado-Technologies
        Tornado-Technologies commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Varagner" post=42462
        Great gun, would very much love to own one in the future.

        Any chance of being able to get one in Australia?
        They're out there, but very expensive.

    • #5
      Very little
      “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing” - Edmund Burke

      Comment


      • #6
        Originally posted by chazbot" post=40830
        Once the lower is removed, you can see the semi-automatic shelf that prevents the easy installation of automatic trigger packs. Not all semi-autos were imported with this shelf and some very early ones (the HK40 series notably) are push pin, meaning a simple lower swap will restore automatic modes of fire.
        Chazbot,
        Only the1966 produced HK41's (Golden State Arms Co., Santa Fe Division import marked) guns allow the installation of an SEF trigger pack. Later ones, whilst twin push pin, had various protrusions to prevent the installation of an SEF trigger pack. Even with the '66 produced ones, installation of an SEF pack will not produces full auto fire as the bolt carrier doesn't have an auto sear trip. I'm pretty sure the same goes for the HK43's.
        I'm assuming yours is an SBR?

        Comment


        • #7
          Thanks Mate,nice piece

          Comment

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