H&K VP70Z

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  • H&K VP70Z

    Not too many pictures this time as I could only find some time before going to work today. If certain pictures are requested, I'll try and take those and post them.

    The H&K VP70 (or Volkspistole 70 as per the manual's introduction of the pisol although some sources claim Vollautomatische Pistole) started as an outgrowth in experimental pistol design for a cheap, lightweight, and simple blowback pistol suitable for mass production for wartime needs. With one of the first uses of a polymer frame (preceded by the Remington Nylon 66 I think, which is a rifle) in a pistol; predating the Glock by nearly 12 years.

    Design work started in 1968 and by the end of 1969, several prototypes have been made and the new Zytel plastic, from Du Pont, is put into production. There are two primary versions of the VP70, the Militär and the Zivil; or military and Civil respectively.

    In the box it cames with the manual, a spare magazine, a test target, warranty card, and little else. My VP70Z is a fifth generational change, featuring an alternate slide serration, the "Z" moniker, lacking the white enamel paint for the markings, but still has the notches at the rear for the stock if the plastic plugs are knocked out of the frame with a punch. The 6th generation removed the stock notches entirely from the Zivil model.


    DSCF0240 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The pistol weighs about 28oz unloaded, and is striker fired with a smooth and crisp trigger that, unfortunately is very heavy (about 18 lbs). This is because there is no "pre-cocking" of the striker, and the travel of the trigger is what generates the force needed to strike the primer. The pistol uses a heel release for the magazine, and has a cross bolt safety.


    DSCF0242 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    One of the most interesting features of the VP70 series is the front sight. The sight is actually a shadow, produced by double ramps of highly polished steel, that create the optical illusion of a dark post front sight. The rear sight is a typical notched rear sight with high visibility paint (although earlier model lacked this). The barrel is pinned to the frame and unlike the previous P9/P9S pistols, the recoil spring is non-orthagonal and can be installed in either direction.

    One last thing of note is that the barrel has very deep rifling (cold hammer forged, but not polygonal), allow gas blow-by from ammunition, which lowers velocity somewhat. This does allow the blowback system to be relatively light recoiling and tolerant of a wide variety of 9mm loads, including +P.


    DSCF0243 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Created with the intention of using a buttstock that enabled automatic fire via a disconnecter, the pistols is top heavy, but lighter than most, and offers an 18 round 9mm magazine and experimental "shadow" sights in 1970 - quite the handy little thing. The pistol was also produced in tiny quantities in 9x21 for the Italian market, although some made it the US. Production halted in 1989.

  • #2
    Mate,

    Great H&K you have there.

    Thanks for the pics & the info on it

    Where's Morgo ???? He likes H&K's toooooo

    Comment


    • Morgo
      Morgo commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by JD" post=27750
      Mate,

      Great H&K you have there.

      Thanks for the pics & the info on it

      Where's Morgo ???? He likes H&K's toooooo
      Sure do, missed out on one a while ago

  • #3
    Very nice chazbot, how do you find the trigger?
    “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing” - Edmund Burke

    Comment


    • chazbot
      chazbot commented
      Editing a comment
      The trigger is quite heavy and stacking, as mentioned in my post, but it is otherwise very smooth with a crisp break that is consistent and definitive. There is no real "reset" point, as the trigger must be move completely forward nearly to engage the striker's lug to fire another shot. The unusual shape of the trigger is surprisingly comfortable, as is the "space ray gun" style grip.
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