Heckler and Koch Model P9S

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  • Heckler and Koch Model P9S

    Next in order is the Heckler and Koch Model HK P9. My specific example here is the Model P9S. Designed in 1965 as a pistol meant for use by special request of the Netherlands Navy for a pistol that used the same roller delay blow back action as the recently adopted G3 rifle and the MP5 submachine gun, the P9 was delivered in the late 60's and satisfied these requirements.

    Originally made in 9mm, single action; it is a cast steel alloy frame and stamped/welded slide with milled forged steel components. The frame is covered in many portions with a Nylon jacket to improve wear resistance and make easier handling and lighter weight. Less than 500 9mm P9 pistols were ever made. Instead, the double-action version quickly replaced it in 1970 to fulfill contracts.


    DSCF0348 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    My P9S (the S is not for "sport model", but rather because of the double action trigger) is in .45 ACP, and is one of only 8000 such pistols produced (compared to the over 200,000 9mm pistols made between 1970 and 197. Like all P9 pistols, it features a polygonally rifled barrel, high base sights, and the single stack magazine. The 9mm version was so named for the 9+1 magazine capacity, while the .45 version I must use 7+1. It also features the normal heel position magazine release and a slide mounted safety.


    DSCF0351 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The pistol features numerous innovations, but has some less than usual features in a military firearm. One notable thing is the multifunction lever on the left side of the frame. This lever can be used to cock or decock the hammer, release the slide or lock it back.


    DSCF0350 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    When cocked, it has a protrusion at the rear as an indicator. The Nylon grips are one piece and are secured at the rear with two screws. The sights are high visibility style, with red rear and white front. The pistol is slim, and comparable to a 1911, but significantly lighter.


    DSCF0367 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here with the slide locked back we can see something unusual through the ejection port. The barrel is a fixed barrel, but it is not fixed to the frame. Rather it is fixed in that it does not move in relation to the frame but is held in place with a thick lug.


    DSCF0353 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    After clearing the pistol and removing the magazine, disassembly is like the previous HK4 pistol - a little tab on the interior of the trigger guard is depressed with the fingertip or a tool to unlock the slide.


    DSCF0354 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The slide is moved forward to engage the disassembly notches in the frame and lifted up and away.


    DSCF0355 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here is the slide and frame interiors, now visible. The "fixed" barrel is kept in the slide unlike other fixed barrel designs.


    DSCF0356 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here you can see the internal hammer - it is not striker as some have guessed. I prefer to use a permanent machine grease in this and the HK4 rather than oil as in here this is more chances by design for the oil to run off from the oilpoints.


    DSCF0357 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    I did not have a screwdriver handy (and unlike the HK4, the tool is not provided). But removing two screws towards the frame's front, will reveal that that the recoil lug and barrel support here is hollow and contains a polymer recoil buffer, similar to the HK4. This retards the energies from the slide and prevents it from beating up the lower. It also noticeably lightens recoil and makes it very smooth.


    DSCF0358 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    In the slide, you remove the barrel/recoil spring assembly the normal way. The recoil spring is unidirectional and can only be properly installed one way. Unlike the HK4, the spring is not captive and fits in a little sleeve around the barrel's chamber.


    DSCF0359 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here is the barrel. Note the two tines and the roller inlets here, as well as the frame lug. The cut out at the top is for the extractor and not a loaded chamber indicator.


    DSCF0360 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    As per the manual, one of the tines is used to remove the bolt head from the cocking piece by depressing an assembly lever.


    DSCF0361 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here you can see the meat of the system: a miniature roller delay bolt, complete with rollers. The bolt head also contains the extractor and extractor spring.


    DSCF0363 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The rollers cam along the shoulder of the locking piece, just like the G3 or MP5. The locking piece can be removed by rotating it, which also releases the firing pin assembly. I did not do this as the FP is under a lot of pressure and I did not want to chance losing it.


    DSCF0364 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here you can sort of see how the bolt, barrel, and rollers interact.


    DSCF0365 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The P9 was originally designed as a machine pistol complete with full auto and burst modes, but these prototypes were dropped from development. Additionally there was a P9K prototype featuring a short (3.75") barrel and would have been available in 9mm, .45 ACP, and .380 ACP. Further development on the P9 was cut short with the death of Theodor Koch.

    There also exists the P9S Target model, which had a Nills wooden grip, the standard Nylon grip, three magazines, a spare slide assembly, a target slide that had a compensator and extended barrel with adjustable rear sight and a taller front sight blade. The Sport model lacked the extra slide and magazines, but was largely the same.

    There were 25 P9S pistols made for the Italian market in 7.65x21.5mm and a .22LR conversion kit also exists for it (which isn't surprising since all HK firearms have a .22LR kit available).

    A neat little firearm from HK with, to my knowledge, the only example of the roller delay action in a pistol ever made. It is very accurate, and despite the light weight, the polymer buffer and roller delay make shooting quite pleasant.

  • #2
    Originally posted by chazbot" post=22290
    Next in order is the Heckler and Koch Model HK P9. My specific example here is the Model P9S. Designed in 1965 as a pistol meant for use by special request of the Netherlands Navy for a pistol that used the same roller delay blow back action as the recently adopted G3 rifle and the MP5 submachine gun, the P9 was delivered in the late 60's and satisfied these requirements.

    Originally made in 9mm, single action; it is a cast steel alloy frame and stamped/welded slide with milled forged steel components. The frame is covered in many portions with a Nylon jacket to improve wear resistance and make easier handling and lighter weight. Less than 500 9mm P9 pistols were ever made. Instead, the double-action version quickly replaced it in 1970 to fulfill contracts.


    DSCF0348 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    My P9S (the S is not for "sport model", but rather because of the double action trigger) is in .45 ACP, and is one of only 8000 such pistols produced (compared to the over 200,000 9mm pistols made between 1970 and 197. Like all P9 pistols, it features a polygonally rifled barrel, high base sights, and the single stack magazine. The 9mm version was so named for the 9+1 magazine capacity, while the .45 version I must use 7+1. It also features the normal heel position magazine release and a slide mounted safety.


    DSCF0351 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The pistol features numerous innovations, but has some less than usual features in a military firearm. One notable thing is the multifunction lever on the left side of the frame. This lever can be used to cock or decock the hammer, release the slide or lock it back.


    DSCF0350 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    When cocked, it has a protrusion at the rear as an indicator. The Nylon grips are one piece and are secured at the rear with two screws. The sights are high visibility style, with red rear and white front. The pistol is slim, and comparable to a 1911, but significantly lighter.


    DSCF0367 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here with the slide locked back we can see something unusual through the ejection port. The barrel is a fixed barrel, but it is not fixed to the frame. Rather it is fixed in that it does not move in relation to the frame but is held in place with a thick lug.


    DSCF0353 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    After clearing the pistol and removing the magazine, disassembly is like the previous HK4 pistol - a little tab on the interior of the trigger guard is depressed with the fingertip or a tool to unlock the slide.


    DSCF0354 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The slide is moved forward to engage the disassembly notches in the frame and lifted up and away.


    DSCF0355 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here is the slide and frame interiors, now visible. The "fixed" barrel is kept in the slide unlike other fixed barrel designs.


    DSCF0356 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here you can see the internal hammer - it is not striker as some have guessed. I prefer to use a permanent machine grease in this and the HK4 rather than oil as in here this is more chances by design for the oil to run off from the oilpoints.


    DSCF0357 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    I did not have a screwdriver handy (and unlike the HK4, the tool is not provided). But removing two screws towards the frame's front, will reveal that that the recoil lug and barrel support here is hollow and contains a polymer recoil buffer, similar to the HK4. This retards the energies from the slide and prevents it from beating up the lower. It also noticeably lightens recoil and makes it very smooth.


    DSCF0358 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    In the slide, you remove the barrel/recoil spring assembly the normal way. The recoil spring is unidirectional and can only be properly installed one way. Unlike the HK4, the spring is not captive and fits in a little sleeve around the barrel's chamber.


    DSCF0359 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here is the barrel. Note the two tines and the roller inlets here, as well as the frame lug. The cut out at the top is for the extractor and not a loaded chamber indicator.


    DSCF0360 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    As per the manual, one of the tines is used to remove the bolt head from the cocking piece by depressing an assembly lever.


    DSCF0361 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here you can see the meat of the system: a miniature roller delay bolt, complete with rollers. The bolt head also contains the extractor and extractor spring.


    DSCF0363 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The rollers cam along the shoulder of the locking piece, just like the G3 or MP5. The locking piece can be removed by rotating it, which also releases the firing pin assembly. I did not do this as the FP is under a lot of pressure and I did not want to chance losing it.


    DSCF0364 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    Here you can sort of see how the bolt, barrel, and rollers interact.


    DSCF0365 by chazbotic, on Flickr

    The P9 was originally designed as a machine pistol complete with full auto and burst modes, but these prototypes were dropped from development. Additionally there was a P9K prototype featuring a short (3.75") barrel and would have been available in 9mm, .45 ACP, and .380 ACP. Further development on the P9 was cut short with the death of Theodor Koch.

    There also exists the P9S Target model, which had a Nills wooden grip, the standard Nylon grip, three magazines, a spare slide assembly, a target slide that had a compensator and extended barrel with adjustable rear sight and a taller front sight blade. The Sport model lacked the extra slide and magazines, but was largely the same.

    There were 25 P9S pistols made for the Italian market in 7.65x21.5mm and a .22LR conversion kit also exists for it (which isn't surprising since all HK firearms have a .22LR kit available).

    A neat little firearm from HK with, to my knowledge, the only example of the roller delay action in a pistol ever made. It is very accurate, and despite the light weight, the polymer buffer and roller delay make shooting quite pleasant.
    Chazbot,
    Thanks for sharing. The cost to make that gun today would be insane!

    I always had a soft spot for the P7 .

    Morgo will be jealous of!

    Thanks,

    Oddball

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by chazbot" post=22290

      There also exists the P9S Target model, which had a Nills wooden grip, the standard Nylon grip, three magazines, a spare slide assembly, a target slide that had a compensator and extended barrel with adjustable rear sight and a taller front sight blade. The Sport model lacked the extra slide and magazines, but was largely the same.
      I have one of these and the term compensator is incorrect. It is simply a weight added to the end of the barrel akin to a USP match.

      Cheers
      Harry
      As Napoleon said,"only thunderbolts can be preferred to cannon"

      Comment


      • chazbot
        chazbot commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Harry" post=22368
        Originally posted by chazbot" post=22290

        There also exists the P9S Target model, which had a Nills wooden grip, the standard Nylon grip, three magazines, a spare slide assembly, a target slide that had a compensator and extended barrel with adjustable rear sight and a taller front sight blade. The Sport model lacked the extra slide and magazines, but was largely the same.
        I have one of these and the term compensator is incorrect. It is simply a weight added to the end of the barrel akin to a USP match.

        Cheers
        Harry
        A friend with a P9S Target in 9x22mm has an extended threaded barrel which came with a factory compensator. Might be for the Italian market or something. Additionally the weight for the USP is attached to the frame and not the barrel.

    • #4
      Originally posted by chazbot" post=22290
      A neat little firearm from HK with, to my knowledge, the only example of the roller delay action in a pistol ever made. It is very accurate, and despite the light weight, the polymer buffer and roller delay make shooting quite pleasant.
      Ahh, not quite! You're forgetting about the H&K SP89 (and clones; Vector, Cohaire Arms etc), and the Calico M-950. Also of note is the CZ 52, this predates the P9, but is of course roller locked, recoil operated rather than roller delayed blowback.

      Comment


      • chazbot
        chazbot commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Tornado-Technologies" post=22400
        Originally posted by chazbot" post=22290
        A neat little firearm from HK with, to my knowledge, the only example of the roller delay action in a pistol ever made. It is very accurate, and despite the light weight, the polymer buffer and roller delay make shooting quite pleasant.
        Ahh, not quite! You're forgetting about the H&K SP89 (and clones; Vector, Cohaire Arms etc), and the Calico M-950. Also of note is the CZ 52, this predates the P9, but is of course roller locked, recoil operated rather than roller delayed blowback.
        I have an SP89, and as an adapted submachine gun I wouldn't really call it a pistol. The P9 is the only traditional pistol with roller delay.

    • #5
      Sure its not 9x21mm? 9x21 seems to be popular in countries that do not allow 9mm.

      Nice HK by the way

      Wish I could get Harry to sell me his target model :lol:
      “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing” - Edmund Burke

      Comment


      • Tornado-Technologies
        Tornado-Technologies commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Morgo" post=22456
        Sure its not 9x21mm? 9x21 seems to be popular in countries that do not allow 9mm.

        Nice HK by the way

        Wish I could get Harry to sell me his target model :lol:
        Pulled out some books and it turns out the 9x22 is a Euro designation for the .357 SIG.

      • chazbot
        chazbot commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Morgo" post=22456
        Sure its not 9x21mm? 9x21 seems to be popular in countries that do not allow 9mm.

        Nice HK by the way

        Wish I could get Harry to sell me his target model :lol:
        Honestly I remember it being some odd 9mm something with a longer case length than 9x19mm. I know the P9 had a tiny number made in 7.65x21.5mm. It may have been 9x21mm, but I would have to ask. I will email him and see if he can confirm.

      • Harry
        Harry commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Morgo" post=22456

        Wish I could get Harry to sell me his target model :lol:
        Nice try Morgo. I don't sell pistols, I just buy more...

    • #6
      Damn Europeans

      Would be an odd choice for the P9s though since they had 9mm or .45 mags, you would think there might be reliability issues with a .357 Sig.

      I think they also made the P9s in 7.65x22....
      “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing” - Edmund Burke

      Comment


      • #7
        Great duo Harry
        “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing” - Edmund Burke

        Comment

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