Any army blokes or someone who can advise on this technique?

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  • Any army blokes or someone who can advise on this technique?

    Hey guys,

    Sort of a random thing and I only just noticed it now after watching a old time fav movie of mine 'The Rock'.

    In the picture attached, you can see the way hes holding the sidearm with his rifle resting on his arm? Pretty sure in the scene hes emptied his m4 magazine into the poor navy seals hence why he is using his sidearm now.

    Is that just a 'movie thing' or is it actually a military technique cause I haven't seen anything like that in any documentaries or the likes where they rest their rifle in a way where its still accessible but are using a sidearm. Just curious is all!

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  • #2
    I believe that might just be a movie thing mate, at least I was never taught that anyway.

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      I don't know anyone that teaches that, though I have been shown a technique for a slung rifle IA. Effectively you push the rifle to your reaction side (ie non master hand) and retain it by tucking your reaction side elbow into your torso to prevent it swinging back and still allowing access to mags on a vest or other gear. Simultaneously drawing your handgun with your weapon side hand.

    • S12A
      S12A commented
      Editing a comment
      movie thing ,if you raise your arms to fire you will have a rifle blocking your vision and movement , will probably fall of anyway

      you should have a good sling on to move your rifle out of the way when you are going for your side arm.

  • #3
    Just a movie thing mate.

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    • #4
      I have seen that done before by Russian special forces on a news clip some where back . I think the idea is you hold the side arm against the rifle to steady it as the rifle is slinged over his back and more steady than just extending the one arm .
      The US may well do the same thing.

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      • #5
        Movie nonsense. That's okay though. "Gangstas" see stupid snot like this and imitate it. Their loss.

        The only time it gets to be a real problem, is when "good guys" copy movie snot. The one I most commonly have to smack out of people is pistol shooters with their elbows relaxed so that the gun is closer to their face. I have to explain to them that directors get actors to do that so that they can get the actor's pretty mug and the gun "in shot" at the same time for close-ups. (Actors go apeshit for a close up).

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        • #6
          I thought as much!

          Thanks for the replies guys!

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          • #7
            Technical advisor to Micheal Bay director of The Rock :---
            Harry Humphries (born November 17, 1940) is a highly decorated former United States Navy SEAL who currently works as a consultant and actor on Hollywood films. After graduating from Admiral Farragut Academy and attending Rutgers University in New Jersey, Humphries joined the Navy, where he was assigned to UDT 22 and SEAL Team 2. In 1971,

            Not everything in movies is nonsense just because you may not have experienced it .

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            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
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              Hmm....are you saying that everything that happened in the rock is true?

            • Tornado-Technologies
              Tornado-Technologies commented
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              Originally posted by Happy jack" post=9671
              Technical advisor to Micheal Bay director of The Rock :---
              Harry Humphries (born November 17, 1940) is a highly decorated former United States Navy SEAL who currently works as a consultant and actor on Hollywood films. After graduating from Admiral Farragut Academy and attending Rutgers University in New Jersey, Humphries joined the Navy, where he was assigned to UDT 22 and SEAL Team 2. In 1971,

              Not everything in movies is nonsense just because you may not have experienced it .
              Not something I've ever seen in the US, but I was curious about the SEAL adviser, so figured I'd go straight to the horses mouth and emailed a mate of mine in the Teams over in Virginia. He said it's definitely not a SEAL technique and that all transitions taught go off sling to secondary. I think you were correct in that it's probably Russian, most likely Spetsnaz. The Russians try all sorts of crazy stuff. For want of a better word and hopefully not offending any former or current Spetsnaz guys on this site, the term "Clowns" comes to mind to describe them!
              Here's unloading an adversaries AK74 with your feet:


              And who can forget the old back-flip tomahawk attack technique:


              Gotta love this demonstration. I wonder if slamming the guy being dragged behind the truck into the gutter was an accident?

            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
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              Originally posted by Happy jack" post=9671
              Technical advisor to Micheal Bay director of The Rock :---
              Harry Humphries (born November 17, 1940) is a highly decorated former United States Navy SEAL who currently works as a consultant and actor on Hollywood films. After graduating from Admiral Farragut Academy and attending Rutgers University in New Jersey, Humphries joined the Navy, where he was assigned to UDT 22 and SEAL Team 2. In 1971,

              Not everything in movies is nonsense just because you may not have experienced it .
              Mate, I would never say I've expereinced everything. But having been in this caper for about 35 years, I've experienced a lot.

              Including, training with US Navy SEALs and and US Army 'Green Berets'. And one thing I can tell you from that, is that they keep their good shit to themselves and their close friends. They don't much put the good stuff in the movies for every gangsta and wanna-be Bin-Hidin to learn from.

          • #8
            I was never taught to do that but I saw a doco on the Discovery channel about the Spetnaz (Russian Special Forces) they did something very similar.

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            • #9
              If the rifle is empty let it go and give two handed support to the handgun. To do otherwise seems unsound to me so I'm going with just a movie thing.
              “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil, is for good men to do nothing” - Edmund Burke

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              • plourbag
                plourbag commented
                Editing a comment
                Dead right Morgo.
                That's why we carried our H & Ks on a sling. If you had a stoppage you dropped it and grabbed the browning from the holster until you had the short time it took to clear the Hockler. Of course, my day was thirty years ago, so CQB tactics might have changed but not that much. Gotta be another piece of movie c**p!

            • #10
              As many technical advisers as films have, and as "technically accurate" as an operation is described by them, the director is always going to go for the most dramatic staging of the situation.

              It's all about the drama.

              I am a US combat veteran and I think the technique shown is a load of crap, and likely to get the user of same killed if used in reality.

              As others have noted, you allow your rifle to fall by itself (that's why you have that high-dollar "tactical" sling on it, right?) to your side, and run your pistol like you're supposed to.

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              • #11
                I noticed the same thing the other night when the Bourne Identity was on..


                Click image for larger version

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                • S12A
                  S12A commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Not really the same thing , that pic is short stocking which is a fairly common urban technique with a long rifle

              • #12
                After reading this I went out to the safe and tried this technique with the trusty air rifle. It was going all good until I had to reload

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                • #13
                  Originally posted by cadet" post=11017
                  Iit's a small ADF, and anyone - past or present - pretending will soon enough over-reach the limits of their knowledge in front of people who know...
                  Well said cadet, some here already have

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                  • #14
                    I do not see the point of that move other then it looks different. I guess to give the movie something new to other movies.
                    Love your country, love your family, love your sport.

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                    • #15
                      If I may?
                      Whilst that screen grab from "The Rock" is purely for the movies, the technique is actually based on real life (like anything Hollywood though, it kind of happened - based on a true story ).

                      It came from when the primary (ie. long arm) was fitted with a weapon mounted light and pistol mounted lights were a pretty rare thing. So, if the primary went down, the weapon mounted light was left on target, and the pistol was drawn to engage the threat.

                      Obviously, given the unco look and feel of the technique, it wasn't the most optimal solution to the problem.
                      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      Forward!
                      Where we are, where we belong, where we should be.

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                      • Guest's Avatar
                        Guest commented
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                        somebody please make this thread go away

                      • Guest's Avatar
                        Guest commented
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                        Originally posted by 22F" post=17559
                        If I may?
                        It came from when the primary (ie. long arm) was fitted with a weapon mounted light and pistol mounted lights were a pretty rare thing. So, if the primary went down, the weapon mounted light was left on target, and the pistol was drawn to engage the threat.
                        and this was taught by whom exactly?
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