Harris Bipods Info

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Harris Bipods Info

    I previously did a bit of a write up about Harris Bipods but it appears it has been lost when the site re did its format so I have decided to put it back on as I am pretty sure it could be helpful to anyone looking for features of different Harris bipods and their options.


    There are a few handy things to know before choosing the right bipod.

    Harris and the cheaper rip offs (often not quite as good) have several options. General rule of thumb is the taller the bipod the less stable they become.

    These bipods fit to a standard sling stud on your rifle. They can be interchanged fairly easily just by unscrewing a wheel nut with your fingers and unclipping from the stud. You still are able to connect a sling to the bottom of the bipod. Adaptors are available to fit to a picatinny rail.



    These are the common sizes and recommended use:
    (NB: “ indicates size in inches)

    1. 6”- 9” These are ideal off a bench or prone shooting in very short to no grass.



    2. 9” 13” Can be used off a bench – ideal for prone shooting. It allows for slightly higher grass. An average size male should have little problems comfortably shooting on the lowest setting.



    3. 12” – 25” There are a few variations (min 12”/13” to 25”/27”). These are for shooting in seated position. Ideal for longer grass or shooting from areas where prone shooting is difficult (steep slopes, uneven surfaces etc.)



    Once you choose which size is suitable the next is decide what options you want. These options make the bipods more expensive but a lot more useful. Here is a brief description of the main options:

    1. Swivel. This option is usually marked on the model with ‘S’. It gives the bi pod the ability to cant IE ‘Tilt’ the rifle left and right if the bipod is on uneven surfaces. This is very useful. Even decent ground has imperfections, it saves needing to find an even bit of dirt or digging one side of the bipod in to keep rifle level.

    2. Swivel lock. This locks the swivel in position of the desired angle. (Recommended)



    3. Notched legs. These are notches in the legs of the bipod (see picture). Essentially giving set points of height adjustment. They are quite useful but not necessary.



    4. Rota-pod. This attachment gives Harris bipod the ability to ‘Pan’ left to right. This needs to be fitted on a picatinny rail (not swivel stud).





    A few other adaptors available but these are the key ones.

    There are other higher end bipods out there (Atlas, Versa etc.) But Harris and Harris knock offs are probably the most common and a good place to start. They are light weight, quick and easy to use and remove and generally quite practical. They can be noisy to engage and a bit fiddly until you get used to them. They are a great tool to provide a stable shooting platform. I believe they are more than adequate for most shooters.

    This is an interesting article for those that think they aren’t suitable for long range.

    LINK - Bugholes from Bipod

  • #2
    Nice write up Vromme, just a heads up regarding the 13"-27" (HB-25s I think is the model can scan/pan as well as tilt/cant etc without the adapter. The one I use on the 204 Howa does all that without any adapter - it works well as do the Hyskor which is a Harris "Knock-off" I guess (looks similar) and in some ways is better (you press the button and the legs spring out (opposite to the Harris which retracts them).

    Another thing to be aware of with the Harris is when you press the button to retract the legs keep ya fingers out of harms way as they slam shut with some force (been caught out a few times now whilst using it) and it bloody hurts!

    Cheers
    Whacking Varmints is my passion!

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Varminator" post=45153
      Nice write up Vromme, just a heads up regarding the 13"-27" (HB-25s I think is the model can scan/pan as well as tilt/cant etc without the adapter. The one I use on the 204 Howa does all that without any adapter - it works well as do the Hyskor which is a Harris "Knock-off" I guess (looks similar) and in some ways is better (you press the button and the legs spring out (opposite to the Harris which retracts them).

      Another thing to be aware of with the Harris is when you press the button to retract the legs keep ya fingers out of harms way as they slam shut with some force (been caught out a few times now whilst using it) and it bloody hurts!

      Cheers
      Hi Varminator, we have bantered on this point before!
      Harris do not make any models that "pan" but only swivel!!
      To make a harris pan you need to attach the adapter.

      I am happy to be prover wrong if you can show me how that model or any model in their range pans & swivels without the adapter!

      Not having a go but I just want to see it thanks.
      http://www.harrisbipods.com/HB25S.html

  • #3
    Nice article thanks for sharing

    Comment


    • #4
      I know this is an old thread but its still helpful

      What does the C mean in the harris bipods
      like theres the hb25s and the hb25cs.

      Im thinking off going for the 12-25" range as i often shoot in bladeplough and areas without trees.

      Cheers
      Dan

      Comment


      • Vromme
        Vromme commented
        Editing a comment
        Hi Dan, I believe the 'C' is just a slightly longer model.

        25 is 12" to 25"
        25C is 13 1/2" to 27"
        "S" stands for swivel. Def worth getting the swivel esp in these longer bipods where used on uneven ground. You also want a lock a swivel lock (to lock cant in place).

      • Varminator
        Varminator commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Dan" post=89881
        I know this is an old thread but its still helpful

        What does the C mean in the harris bipods
        like theres the hb25s and the hb25cs.

        Im thinking off going for the 12-25" range as i often shoot in bladeplough and areas without trees.

        Cheers
        Dan
        I think the C designates "Cant".

    • #5
      Hey guys so with a bit of research it looks like the 'C' just means it is a bit taller.

      Because of money situations atm i might go for a smaller bipod (9-13") for now then get the hb25s later.

      Dan

      Comment


      • #6
        Should I go Notched legs or normal ones?
        This bipod will only be used for hunting.

        I cant seem to find a site that does a decent site.
        Does anyone know a good place to get them from thats cheap?

        Dan

        Comment


        • Jester308
          Jester308 commented
          Editing a comment
          Notched.. A lot more user friendly for quick adjustments.. As for cheap, check out the one in the for sales, not a bad price.

          JJ

        • Guest's Avatar
          Guest commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by Dan" post=90282
          Should I go Notched legs or normal ones?
          This bipod will only be used for hunting.

          I cant seem to find a site that does a decent site.
          Does anyone know a good place to get them from thats cheap?

          Dan
          Hunting...learn to shoot off your pack. Allows you to compensate for all sorts of geographical weirdness that a bipod will not. And doesn't get caught in absolutely everything even slightly more entangling than unclipped pubes.

      • #7
        Originally posted by Varminator" post=91278
        Originally posted by Aushunter" post=91076
        Varminator don't get me wrong this is not a personal thing but what you do with the leg placement does not make a standard Harris a swivel & pan bipod.

        I repeat the Harris bipod cannot pan(in the proper use of the term) without the adapter, they are not made like an Atlas!

        You can push one leg forward as on your picture to give you the effect of a pan but the bipod assembly itself DOES NOT PAN!!
        The result is the same mate I can track things through the scope - I'm not sure how much more movement you need when it comes to tracking stuff but I can tell ya I can't use what's available. :lol: trust me it works fine.
        Ok this is my final comment on the subject.

        Due you see the point I am trying to make here Varminator??

        You may be able to pan the Harris with manipulating the range of motion of the legs but the way you are describing the Harris in this thread & other threads on this forum is that the standard "S" type of Harris is a "swivel & pan" type of bipod which is totally misleading & incorrect.

        The mechanism does "swivel" but will not "pan or rotate" without the adapter!!

        Im glad the method that you have described works for you but I think you may in future want to be more careful when describing the Harris as a panning/rotating bipod as not to mislead any new shooters who may purchase one & expect it to pivot & pan/rotating from the mechanism!!

        http://www.harrisbipods.com/RBA3.html

        Just my 2 cents

        Happy shooting Varminator

        Comment


        • #8
          I have removed the dead fox pics as they are not in the hunting section.

          I have also added a sticky as I feel this thread may help shooters entering the bipod market.

          JH

          Comment

          Working...
          X