Modified cases for Hornady OAL gauge

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  • Modified cases for Hornady OAL gauge

    So my tap arrived two weeks ago, board out my brain. I decided to make a few bullet seating cases for the Hornady OAL gauge.

    The .223 was the worst to make, as the material removed made the case walls thin and it would collapse ( from the force of the jaws in the lathe ) or it would spin and chew up the case. I only had 2 cases that were Junkers ( I sort my cases by weight in .223 for Fclass ) the two cases were 6.5 grns over the norm case weight and the was only the two in that mix of 200 I had ( so junked them ) So I'll have to wait to make some more of the .223. The reast of the cases were easy.

    All the case length gauges, were made from Junkers brass ( had there usefull life ) End result is below ( made 4x of each case ) with the exception of .223.


  • #2
    Nice work skip.
    I love when you can do your own gear but i think ill contunue to send mine to Stuart from BRT as it looks like to much trouble for me

    Comment


    • El-Skippo
      Skip commented
      Editing a comment
      It's a simple process, the only one that was a "pain in the ass" was the .223

      I did think of getting mine done by Stuart and Annie. But then I thought to myself, why not give it a go. Couldn't be that hard After receiving a 6.5x47 one. Done by a friend.

      Lathe, Center drill ( or what ever they are called ) , 6.90mm drill bit, 5/16x36 tap, lube, and a countersink bit to hand turn the burrs off. I think it turned out OK

      I like to tinker, also mid way through my case annealer. But that's for another day

  • #3
    A way that I will try to hold cases for threading the heads is using a sizing die.
    Strip it down and insert the case and lathe or drill away to your hearts content.
    If you don`t want any chuck marks on the die body then either thread it into a dedicated tubing holder or screw it into apiece of black polly pipe first.
    The bigger size of the die body will be ample to hold it firm against the smaller tap.

    That`s the theory anyway and how I will try it.

    A source of good sized solid steel small rods and bushes is from old sewing machines.
    Motors too with a foot controller no less.
    Just build up a bush / boss to fit the motor and old drill chucks can be threaded on to the other end for shell holders and tools.
    Some good little tools can be made from sewing machines by turning them up side down and just having the needle post bit that goes up and down protruding through a work table too ..... little jig saws and polishing tools // grinders etc anythings possible with them ...just replace the needle with your tools of choice ... you still have the foot to put down ward pressure on the work .. like fretting saws...only limited by imagination .
    Electric sewing machines that don`t sew properly .[usually the operators fault ] are a dime a dozen as SHE MUST have a newer model every time the power goes off etc..... not mine but many are unfortunate enough to be in the company of both women and sewing machines that neither works as it should and its invariably the operators fault often for not pushing the right buttons
    [center]
    Don’t poke the snake, walk around it and come back later with a double-barrelled shotgun and blow its [email protected]#!ing head off!.

    Australia in future, the outcome is the same, a bloody dictatorship run on the whims of a very few ego-centric pathological elitists.

    Comment


    • El-Skippo
      Skip commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by NoFerals" post=43506
      A way that I will try to hold cases for threading the heads is using a sizing die.
      Strip it down and insert the case and lathe or drill away to your hearts content.
      If you don`t want any chuck marks on the die body then either thread it into a dedicated tubing holder or screw it into apiece of black polly pipe first.
      The bigger size of the die body will be ample to hold it firm against the smaller tap.

      That`s the theory anyway and how I will try it.
      That's not a bad idea Feral's

  • #4
    Thanks for the info.....I was about to see what the thread details were and saw this

    I have quiet a few Cals that are not easy to find, including .50 Cal that I am just about to make.....

    Comment


    • El-Skippo
      Skip commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Harb" post=43516
      Thanks for the info.....I was about to see what the thread details were and saw this

      I have quiet a few Cals that are not easy to find, including .50 Cal that I am just about to make.....
      No worries

      The brass that is in the box ready for the scrap yard ( flogged out primer pocket's ) had some usefulness after all Now they just gotta get in the SS tumbler for a polish and they'll be good as gold.

  • #5
    Hey Skip, where did you get the tap from?
    Only place I could find was Tracey Tools in the UK. So went for a drive last time I was there and got me one. They even put a bit of leads (taper on the start of the tap) on it for me to make it easier to start in the brass, highly recommended.
    Have to admit tho, I haven't tried a .223 case yet.

    Comment


    • El-Skippo
      Skip commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Jonno" post=44323
      Hey Skip, where did you get the tap from?
      Only place I could find was Tracey Tools in the UK. So went for a drive last time I was there and got me one. They even put a bit of leads (taper on the start of the tap) on it for me to make it easier to start in the brass, highly recommended.
      Have to admit tho, I haven't tried a .223 case yet.
      I got two taps from china from fleabay $20 and 1 month to arrive.

      They are HSS taps, they do the job. I tried getting one from sutton from the local tool shop but no luck. So I said stuff it eBay it is.

      They are only tapping brass so there's a snow balls chance in hell that I could break it. But I got a spare just in case

      http://bit.ly/1gFJ4ZK

  • #6
    Skip, if you've got a lathe, why not just single point cut the thread? it's a lot less load than a tap and no chance of it spinning in the chuck, plus most likely a better thread.
    Guns don't kill people, Chuck Norris does.

    Comment


    • El-Skippo
      Skip commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Gregt" post=47795
      Skip, if you've got a lathe, why not just single point cut the thread? it's a lot less load than a tap and no chance of it spinning in the chuck, plus most likely a better thread.
      That's a good idea Greg....But

      If you have seen the machine we got ...... and the tooling You'll know why i did it with a tap. ( cheap nasty lathe ) with many user's before me ( She's is in need of a major birthday ) At the start of the year, the apprentice usedd the screw drive and ran the head stock into the chuck and made a good job of it.

      If i wish i had my own lathe But the new house has a nice big shed ATM i can only use it when not on work time. I drill the hole after getting centered and starting the hole, with a center drill. While in the chuck, then start the tap with the drill chuck after removing the center. bit of lube It's not bad, the only case that was a pain was the .223

      I am still happy with the result Just gotta make a few more .223 one's

  • #7
    fair enough! I've just given myself another job to do when I have some spare time. I ground up an internal threading tool ages ago to make a retaining collar for one of my bore gauges, I think it was a 14x.5 thread or something silly like that, I'll dig it out and have a go one of these days. I think it'll be small enough to do a 5/16 thread.
    Guns don't kill people, Chuck Norris does.

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