Differences between Dies (LEE) RGB, Pacesetter and Collet Dies ???

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  • Differences between Dies (LEE) RGB, Pacesetter and Collet Dies ???

    HI All,
    I am getting ready to start reloading, and have made progress towards having a fundamental understanding of what I need to do, when I start in January.

    I have some basic Lee gear, no particular reason, but I wanted to start getting get so I can get my head around the bewildering array of different stuff.
    (I did read on the previous forum that someone had asked about reloading gear and someone had said the Lee stuff was a good start)

    I have a few Lee RGB dies, that seem to be the entry level dies, and I am planning on replacing these when I have a better understanding of what I am doing.

    In reading the Lee brochure and some posts here mainly, I have come to the conclusion that I might need a factory chimp die ?

    From my understanding the RGB dies, will seat the bullet, and if I back off a bit, will also then partially crimp my neck around the projectile. From what I have read, it seems that the projectile needs to be crimped in to some degree quite firmly so that as pressure is building up after the primer has been ignited it can start down the barrel after the pressure is sufficient to help it achieve a decent velocity. From my readings it seems that the RGB dies may not be able to do this tightly enough ?

    Is this marketing propaganda or is there some wisdom in putting out the extra funds to get a factory crimp die for each of my calibers ?

    I have also been looking at the Lee Collet Dies, which apparently only neck size the case and do not full length size the whole cartridge. Lee claim that this gives better brass life, but they also don't seem to from what I have read in the brochure to include the factory crimp die that is included in their pacesetter die set. They also have a promotion by a world record holder who attributes his accuracy to some customised collet dies.

    The lee brochure says that "Die Sets include, Collet neck sizing die, dead length bullet seating die, shell holder, powder measure, charge table and storage box".

    This has me a bit confused about if the factory crimp dies are actually something that is really necessary for accuracy.

    If someone can help me understand why you would need a factory crimp die, such as the pacesetter die set has, and why the collet dies would not have it, I would be greatly appreciative.

    Thanks in advance

    Cheers Broomy

  • #2
    I don't believe lee F/L or collet dies crimp that is why they have a crimp die. Well mine don't. The lee dies are not locked into place with the ring like other dies so each die can only perform one task based on that it only works when the shell holder presses firmly against the die. If you have a bit of extra coin go redding IMO one of the nicer die sets will cost you $110 for a 3 die set but they are very well machined. RCBS is good gear. The lee stuff works well but IMO is priced accordingly and just doesnt have the same "feel" to it.

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      Originally posted by CrabbyCrab" post=38796
      I don't believe lee F/L or collet dies crimp that is why they have a crimp die. Well mine don't. The lee dies are not locked into place with the ring like other dies so each die can only perform one task based on that it only works when the shell holder presses firmly against the die. If you have a bit of extra coin go redding IMO one of the nicer die sets will cost you $110 for a 3 die set but they are very well machined. RCBS is good gear. The lee stuff works well but IMO is priced accordingly and just doesnt have the same "feel" to it.
      Hey Crabby,

      I got the lee stuff knowing its not the best, but as I am learning, I figured learn the basics then get the good gear, including a better press and dies, once I know what is what.

      Cheers

      Broomy

  • #3
    You don't necessarily HAVE to crimp. I don't crimp any of my reloads, I simply rely on neck tension. For hunting I use the Lee delux set. I neck size and seat for the most part, I only run them through the FL die when they start to get hard to load. For my target rifle I intend to use a Redding neck bushing for a bit more precision.

    You are going to find there is very little in the reloading world that is hard and fast, once you get through the basics it is all very much an opinion.

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      Originally posted by tinytim" post=38849
      You don't necessarily HAVE to crimp. I don't crimp any of my reloads, I simply rely on neck tension. For hunting I use the Lee delux set. I neck size and seat for the most part, I only run them through the FL die when they start to get hard to load. For my target rifle I intend to use a Lee neck bushing for a bit more precision.

      You are going to find there is very little in the reloading world that is hard and fast, once you get through the basics it is all very much an opinion.
      Hey TinyTim,

      I agree anything is easy once you have done it and understand it, but at times its the getting to know it that is hard. Actually getting some gear and getting used to one brand has helped me make it easier, playing with it, holding it helped me develop a better understanding, instead of trying to focus on each and every vendors gear.

      So do you neck size with the collet die ??

      I have got one pacesetter set in 223, so will have a chance to play with a crimp die, and have yet to get a collet die. I haven't actually used them yet, just got them and held and looked at them and other components whilst reading or watching videos.

      One of my rifles is a 30/30 marlin and I will be wanting to reload for that, any idea of if it will push the projectile in if I don't crimp it on that ? Or am I getting to focused on the need to crimp and it won't be a problem and neck tension should be enough to hold the projectile in place ??

      I am excited about reloading, and am looking forward to knowing what I am doing, and starting to develop my own loads for my rifles, and seeing what I can do. It appeals to my analytical mind working out the powder, projectile, learning more about the ballistics and then putting it all together, and having it work/or not work and knowing why.

      Cheers

      Broomy

  • #4
    A bit of gear that I now find indispensable is a bullet comparator.
    I get mine from BRT, the Sinclair one http://www.benchrest.com.au/casebulletprep.htm#sinclair

    I am still paranoid about making a round that's too long.

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