What is your reloading order and why?

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  • What is your reloading order and why?

    You can obviously vary the order of some of the steps to reloading - within reason (prob better to add powder before putting in bullet etc).

    You can also do a lot more steps depending on how anal you want to get. I dont BR or comp shoot but like to have reasonable accuracy without too many steps. At the moment my order is:

    NOTE: ---Italics only done when required

    ---1. Tumble clean
    2. Lube
    ---3. Full length size
    4. Neck size/deprime
    ---5. Trim
    6. Debur/chamfer inside then outside edge (I do this before tumble clean as I notice small fragments of brass can go into case)
    7. Tumble clean
    8. Clean primer pockets and 9. clean inside neck with brush (double checking for stuck media
    10. Prime
    11. Powder throw onto scales just under load size and trickle till hits required load
    12. Charge cases
    13. Seat bullet

    During the process there are several steps that I can thoroughly check the cases.

    I have a few q's.

    1. Any suggestions for improving either order of steps or extra steps needed? I havent worried about batch sizing brass, I use Lapua for my accurate loads so think its prob good enough for me. I also keep them ordered in number of firings (or close to) when possible.

    2. Should you re neck size after you debur? I assume by deburring by hand (I currently use a Redding No.9 deburring tool) you may slightly vary the neck, particularly the inside edge. Possibly make no difference just want to know what others think.

    3. I use walnut shell media with a little brasso (I know some say this will reduce brass life but I dont mind buying more when that happens). Does anyone see any dramas with cleaning lube off this way?

    4. I use RCBS manual scales and find them quite accurate generally. The only issue I find is that when trickling up you need to tap the basket and let it swing a little and then settle. If you dont do this it can go over the desired load and it will initially show it as being on or just under. It seems to need a bit of movement when fine tuning. Anyone else find this? I am guessing good quality electronic scales reduces this problem.

    Please put up your order of steps. If you do a different order let us know why. I wouldn’t mind comparing and seeing what I can improve on.

  • #2
    Me,
    • Lube
    • FL resize/deprime
    • chamfer/deburr
    • Prime
    • Charge
    • Seat Projectile
    • Every now and then I trim/clean em.
    • Then I Shoot ferals!


    Why do I do it that way? because it works - I don't stuff around making brass pretty, no need as the feral's fall over whether the brass is shiny or not and on top of that I've got better things to do than fart around trying to extract millimeters out of a group size, me I like keeping it simple, simple to me is if it works that's good enough and if it don't fix it so it does.

    So long as the fur falls over I'm happy! :lol:
    Whacking Varmints is my passion!

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      1. Tumble.
      2. Wash/clean.
      3. 're-size.
      4. Trim if necessary .
      5. Chamfer , clean primer pockets and flash hole.
      6. Seat primer.
      7. Charge case.
      8. Seat projectile.

      I like clean brass that shines

    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Varminator" post=32885
      Me,
      • Lube
      • FL resize/deprime
      • chamfer/deburr
      • Prime
      • Charge
      • Seat Projectile
      • Every now and then I trim/clean em.
      • Then I Shoot ferals!


      Why do I do it that way? because it works - I don't stuff around making brass pretty, no need as the feral's fall over whether the brass is shiny or not and on top of that I've got better things to do than fart around trying to extract millimeters out of a group size, me I like keeping it simple, simple to me is if it works that's good enough and if it don't fix it so it does.

      So long as the fur falls over I'm happy! :lol:
      Same for me and I get half minute groups out of .308 doing this and thats about as good as I can shoot anyway, so I think little is gained by all that extra effort if you are not using it for competition purposes. That said though my .338LM is proving to be little more re-load/load fussy than any of my .308's

  • #3
    lube, de-prime, inspect - trim and re-size case, ultra-sonic clean,steel wool polish and cotton bud clean inside, re-prime, powder and seat projectile & check size. I do it this way because my system works for me and have been able to get a load that works and shoots well.
    A roo shooter mate - inspects the cases, lubes, deprimes, reprimes, powders, seats projectile and uses cases bout 4-5 times. He never cleans cases and never will he reakons. Each to their own...
    Got it, Load it, shoot it..

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Well done feral, your the only person so far that mentioned to inspect cases or does everyone think thats a given?

  • #4
    Tumble
    Neck size (full lenth if needed)
    Trim & chamfer
    Prime
    Powder
    Projie
    Shoot
    Repeat as required

    Comment


    • #5
      Originally posted by Vromme" post=32878
      I have a couple of q's for some of the experts.

      1. Any suggestions for improving either order of steps or extra steps needed. I havent worried about batch sizing brass, I use Lapua for my accurate loads so think its prob good enough for me. I also keep them ordered in number of firings (or close to) when possible.

      2. Should you re neck size after you debur? I assume by deburring by hand (I currently use a Redding No.9 deburring tool) you may slightly vary the neck, particularly the inside edge. Possibly make no difference just want to know what others think.

      3. I use walnut shell media with a little brasso (I know some say this will reduce brass life but I dont mind buying more when that happens). Does anyone see any dramas with cleaning lube off this way?

      4. I use RCBS manual scales and find them quite accurate generally. The only issue I find is that when trickling up you need to tap the basket and let it swing a little and then settle. If you dont do this it can go over the desired load and it will initially show it as being on or just under. It seems to need a bit of movement when fine tuning. Anyone else find this? I am guessing good quality electronic scales reduces this problem.

      Please put up your order of steps. If you do different order let us know why. I wouldn’t mind comparing and seeing what I can improve on.
      No expert here (been reloading for years but not really into all the fancy stuff some get up to). No need I only hunt.

      1. I don't batch em either, no do I worry about how many times they have been fired, I toss em when they split or the primer pockets become loose or the primer falls out type deal. As for order of reloading I think what your doing is good enough. KISS is my way of thinking when it comes to this stuff.

      2. I can't see the deburring process making any diff to neck tension (I wouldn't bother if it was me).

      3. Who knows to be honest (lots of theories with little evidence to back them up as far as I've seen) if it works for you and your happy to do it why not just keep doing it?

      4. I used to do the same thing as you re bumping the pan to make sure it was accurate, as to whether a electronic one is better or not, again lots of opinions on what's what when it comes to this stuff and most of it is just that an opinion with little or no scientific research to back up the opinion, end of the day Vromme, if what your doing is getting results that your satisfied with why change because someone say's there's a better way, it might well be better to them but doesn't mean the results will be better for you. As the old saying goes "Many ways to skin a Cat" same goes with the firearms caper, lots of different ways to achieve the same result, find what works for you and stick with it.

      Anyway that's how I see things, no doubt others will see it different.

      Cheers
      Whacking Varmints is my passion!

      Comment


      • Vromme
        Vromme commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Varm,

        I dont mind changing/trying new ways of doing things, I usually find improved results and if nothing else it keeps things interesting. I do this with most things I do (fishing, dog training, weights/cardio training, kickboxing etc). Essentially I try out what others do who have decent experience/success and adopt it myself if it works for me. Personal preference does play a huge role, a world champion may train in a particular way that looks like the best way of doing things, but when you try it out you dont see the benefit.

        It is difficult in shooting (as most sports) as most of the evidence is anecdotal and not really scientific (esp fishing!) Im constantly looking for improvement in anything I do. I find it rewarding making any positive progress (even if its minor). If I actually managed to hit perfection at something I would probably try something else.

        I prob shouldnt have said 'experts' in my original post. I think a lot of blokes (or girls) here dont like to consider themselves experts (even though there would be a few here that probably are). I will edit it out of my original post and see if I can drum up some more answers.

        Cheers

    • #6
      Originally posted by Vromme" post=32878
      4. I use RCBS manual scales and find them quite accurate generally. The only issue I find is that when trickling up you need to tap the basket and let it swing a little and then settle. If you dont do this it can go over the desired load and it will initially show it as being on or just under. It seems to need a bit of movement when fine tuning. Anyone else find this? I am guessing good quality electronic scales reduces this problem.
      .
      What scale is it, 505 or 1010?
      I have the 505 & think they are a good scale but just to slow for bulk loading.
      I can only think of 2 things,
      1. Clean the nylon parts where the scale pivots(probably with metho &a coton bud?)
      2. Check the pan has enough sand in the base(its ballest to zero it quicker & keep it more stable) I have heard before that they are sometimes low on weight or empty!

      Comment


      • Vromme
        Vromme commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Aushunter" post=34310
        Originally posted by Vromme" post=32878
        4. I use RCBS manual scales and find them quite accurate generally. The only issue I find is that when trickling up you need to tap the basket and let it swing a little and then settle. If you dont do this it can go over the desired load and it will initially show it as being on or just under. It seems to need a bit of movement when fine tuning. Anyone else find this? I am guessing good quality electronic scales reduces this problem.
        .
        What scale is it, 505 or 1010?
        I have the 505 & think they are a good scale but just to slow for bulk loading.
        I can only think of 2 things,
        1. Clean the nylon parts where the scale pivots(probably with metho &a coton bud?)
        2. Check the pan has enough sand in the base(its ballest to zero it quicker & keep it more stable) I have heard before that they are sometimes low on weight or empty!
        I think the drama is they are cheapies, RCBS 130 prob should get a higher end model!
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