Where can I learn about projectiles and powder

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  • Where can I learn about projectiles and powder

    Hi All,
    I am starting my journey down the track of getting ready to learn about reloading, and have posted about the kit I have collected so far.

    I am wondering if anyone has any good tips on where to go to find information about what powders to use (I see so many and am not sure why I want to have one over the other) ideally I will be wanting to have one powder to start with (for 223, 30/30, 308 and 303)

    I am also not sure about what projectiles I want to start with and how to identify what they are for.
    Do cartridges come marked for a specific caliber, or is there another way to work out what caliber they will work for.

    I am wanting to learn, so if you can point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated.

    I have a couple reloading books, but havent fully read them yet, as I havent been able to understand everything I have read so far.

    Cheers

    Broomy

  • #2
    Well Uncle Nicks book is a good start.

    as too powders. I did at one stage use 2208 for .223,308.303.

    I have no experience with shooting or reloading .30-30

    Comment


    • #3
      For powders, just check out the ADI site:

      http://www.adi-powders.com.au/handloaders-guide/

      For projectiles, you need to determine your precise purpose - paper targets, small animals, long range, metallic silhouette etc. You might need hollow point boat tails (HPBTs), round nose, full metal jackets, cast lead, soft points, polymer points etc etc.

      Then this has to be matched to your barrel for twist rate. Your LGS guys should be able to provide you sound advice if you come in at a quiet time for a chat.

      Be aware that powder prices are similar in many shops but there is huge variation in projectiles - everything from 10c to $1.50 each.

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      • Guest's Avatar
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        Editing a comment
        Thanks Stan and Skip,

        My immediate goal, is to be ready with all the kit to start reloading in Jan, over the xmas break. I am just wanting to focus on learning how to reload, and am looking at probably doing the standard loads, then as I become more comfortable, play with weights and different powders.

        I have the most 308 brass, so will probably start with that first.

        Initially I will only be shooting paper and tin cans out bush, to get the feel of what I am doing and then playing with it to see what making changes (safe changes) have on the results and the accuracy.

        Cheers

        Broomy

    • #4
      ************************************************** *****************************************

      Found this for on a quick Google search.



      Thanks...






      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OupCjYZoCpE


      ************************************************** *****************************************

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        Thanks Maverick,

        I will look at this and hopefully be able to get enough knowledge to search myself. The biggest problem I have is not knowing the correct terminolgy and what to search for just yet.

        Cheers

        Broomy

    • #5
      hey broomy, i think you've hit on the main purpose of shooting forums. ever seen this post ".308 load data wanted"

      It's a common question because no one wants to go out and buy $200 worth of the wrong bullets or powder

      where can you learn about bullets and powder? start at your google search page, the interweb is full of sites and forums where shooters share their experiences and opinions on loads, powders and bullets. some of the US stuff isn't available here, some of it (like the adi powders) is known under different names and there's some deciphering to be done

      also the manufacturers are reasonably good at suggesting the right thing, it's in their interest after all.

      if you have questions, ask them. whei i started looking for hunting bullets for my 7-08 there were some members on the old forum who had a load of experience loading for the 7-08 and had good advice,

      good luck with it, there's a lot to absorb and a bit of experimenting to be done to work out for yourself what advice is good and what advice is a case of "your milage may vary" YMMV

      steve

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        Hey 6602 Steve,
        I see it as not wanting to make a complete stuff up and get the wrong get and get started badly. By having finally got some reloading gear after wanting to get started for some time, the gear and how it works is making more sense.

        I expect that mileage will vary, but am working under the premise that the more i know the better my mileage will be.
        Cheers

        Broomy

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        Hey 6602 Steve,
        I see it as not wanting to make a complete stuff up and get the wrong get and get started badly. By having finally got some reloading gear after wanting to get started for some time, the gear and how it works is making more sense.

        I expect that mileage will vary, but am working under the premise that the more i know the better my mileage will be.
        Cheers

        Broomy

    • #6
      This being a Australian shooting forum should be a good place to start gathering information.

      To help us out can you provide some details.


      *What is the purpose / intentions of each cartridge/ rifle you own?
      *What twist rate is each barrel? If you dont know please share what make each rifle is.
      *The length of the barrels. (it should not matter much unless the 223 is a real shorty)

      With that basic information I am sure members will point you in the right direction for your needs.

      Download the ADI manual. Its a good place to start.

      JH

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        Originally posted by John23" post=31203
        This being a Australian shooting forum should be a good place to start gathering information.

        To help us out can you provide some details.


        *What is the purpose / intentions of each cartridge/ rifle you own?
        *What twist rate is each barrel? If you dont know please share what make each rifle is.
        *The length of the barrels. (it should not matter much unless the 223 is a real shorty)

        With that basic information I am sure members will point you in the right direction for your needs.

        Download the ADI manual. Its a good place to start.

        JH
        Hey John,
        My 30/30 Ihave no idea about the twist its a Marlin 336CS, my two 223 are I think both 1 in 9 Ruger No3 and Thompson Center Icon, the 303 No4 with a new barrel I have no idea about, and the 308 is a Ruger Gunsite.

        I want to use my 30/30, 308 and 303 as bush target rifles, and one of my 223 as well. I am looking at selling my No 3 and getting a Rossi so I can have a single shot, in 223 and many other calibers as a backup rifle/shotgun, and also to play with different calibers cheapily before commiting to a dedicated rifle.

        With the 303 I want to replicate the military load as much as possible, not sure why, but I just want to. My plans for the Thompson Center I am planning on having as a range rifle.

        I have the ADI manual and have had a look at the powders and have seen that there are several powders that will cross the calibers I want to relaod. Its really the getting the projectiles that is the biggest mystery to me. I have Nick Harveys manuals the latest Lee manual, as I have just got a lot of lee stuff to get started.

        My main goal is to work out how to do it properly, so that is my initial concern. Do it right then worry about different projectiles and different powders and working out loads and balistics and so on. its only recently that I started to use a scope and be aware of the many many caliber choices that I have. So its a pretty steep learning curve for me.

        I am keen for well written resources, and supporting videos to help me learn and understand, that way i wil be able to learn what it all means and then contribute towards the forum later.

        hope that this makes some sense.

        Cheers

        Broomy

    • #7
      Skip's on the money. Nick Harvey's book is a reloaders bible, this man has forgotten more about all aspects of shooting than most will ever know.

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      • several
        several commented
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        I'm currently trying to polish up my knowledge for reloading also, I'm finding the ADI website a wealth of information as powder knowledge goes.

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        Originally posted by Bricktop" post=31205
        Skip's on the money. Nick Harvey's book is a reloaders bible, this man has forgotten more about all aspects of shooting than most will ever know.
        Hey Bricktop, there are many people who have forgotten more than I will ever know. I have Nick Harveys Manual, but dont fully understand the information in it yet.

        Cheers

        Broomy

    • #8
      Gidday Broomy,

      ADI's AR2208 is listed for your .223, 30-30, .308 and .303 - so that makes your powder selection a lot easier and simpler.
      As a bonus- having only 1 type of powder for your reloads makes it impossible to mix up powders.

      projie selection will depend on twist rate of your barrel and intended use.

      but!

      - a projie around 55 to 60 grains is a pretty good allrounder in a .223- but for best performance the twist rate and intended use is needed.

      -lever actions "generally" have tube magazines and need flat nosed projectiles- or specially tipped projies to prevent detonation in the mag. tube.
      The few blokes I know with lever action 30-30's use 150 grain projies, commercially cast and coated, or jacketed.

      -My .303's prefer flat based projies - possibly due to having more bearing surface to better stabilise them compared to boat tail projies in the generous chambers, throats and bores, in my opinion, boat tail projies are wasted unless shooting long ranges [over 500-600 yards]
      TAIPAN 150 or 170 grain flat based hollowpoints are .312" diametre compared to most other brands being .311". [that extra thou helps]
      I have found Taipan 170 grain projies can be loaded to closely match military sights out to 600 yards [limit of our range] and make a damn good dual purpose target and hunting round.

      To save a few bob, you could arrange a bulk buy of cases from AV ballistics [QLD] they sell once fired cases that have been cleaned, sized, prepped and are ready to load. Pretty sure he has .223, .308, possibly .303, maybe if you are lucky 30-30.

      Same with projies- a bulk purchase from Taipan, or any of the Aussie mail and internet sales order will get you up and running pretty quick.

      All the best,

      stephen
      all times wasted wots not spent shootin'

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        Originally posted by [email protected]" post=31230
        Gidday Broomy,

        ADI's AR2208 is listed for your .223, 30-30, .308 and .303 - so that makes your powder selection a lot easier and simpler.
        As a bonus- having only 1 type of powder for your reloads makes it impossible to mix up powders.

        projie selection will depend on twist rate of your barrel and intended use.

        but!

        - a projie around 55 to 60 grains is a pretty good allrounder in a .223- but for best performance the twist rate and intended use is needed.

        -lever actions "generally" have tube magazines and need flat nosed projectiles- or specially tipped projies to prevent detonation in the mag. tube.
        The few blokes I know with lever action 30-30's use 150 grain projies, commercially cast and coated, or jacketed.

        -My .303's prefer flat based projies - possibly due to having more bearing surface to better stabilise them compared to boat tail projies in the generous chambers, throats and bores, in my opinion, boat tail projies are wasted unless shooting long ranges [over 500-600 yards]
        TAIPAN 150 or 170 grain flat based hollowpoints are .312" diametre compared to most other brands being .311". [that extra thou helps]
        I have found Taipan 170 grain projies can be loaded to closely match military sights out to 600 yards [limit of our range] and make a damn good dual purpose target and hunting round.

        To save a few bob, you could arrange a bulk buy of cases from AV ballistics [QLD] they sell once fired cases that have been cleaned, sized, prepped and are ready to load. Pretty sure he has .223, .308, possibly .303, maybe if you are lucky 30-30.

        Same with projies- a bulk purchase from Taipan, or any of the Aussie mail and internet sales order will get you up and running pretty quick.

        All the best,

        stephen
        Hey Stephen,

        Thanks, I was looking at several ADI powders and will probably grab one such as the AR2208 as I want to have as little for learning as possible, and the idea of having four to five powders and then working out I dont want one seems a bit silly.

        I have banged off an email to AV Balistics to see what they say about availabiltiy and price of used brass. It will be interesting to see how much they charge. I figure that I will destroy a few cases as I am learning.

        I will look at the projectiles you ahve mentioned, and the 170GN for the 303 is about what I am going to try (as I think that is close to the military spec projectile)

        Cheers and thanks for the post

        Broomy

    • #9
      Originally posted by broomy" post=31187
      Hi All,
      I am starting my journey down the track of getting ready to learn about reloading, and have posted about the kit I have collected so far.

      I am wondering if anyone has any good tips on where to go to find information about what powders to use (I see so many and am not sure why I want to have one over the other) ideally I will be wanting to have one powder to start with (for 223, 30/30, 308 and 303)

      I am also not sure about what projectiles I want to start with and how to identify what they are for.
      Do cartridges come marked for a specific caliber, or is there another way to work out what caliber they will work for.

      I am wanting to learn, so if you can point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated.

      I have a couple reloading books, but havent fully read them yet, as I havent been able to understand everything I have read so far.

      Cheers

      Broomy
      Broomy, I don't reload for .308 but in general(IMO) when it comes down to projectile choice you need to ask yourself what is its intended purpose E.g game type or designed just for target.
      http://www.sierrabullets.com/resources/bullet-selection/index.cfm
      Projectiles are made in a certain diameter & you need to match that diameter to the cartridge you are using, E.g you can use a 6.5mm projectile in a .260 rem, 6.5X55 Mauser, 6.5-284, .264 Winchester magnum, they are the cartridges & they are all 6.5 caliber & the cases are stamped accordingly on the base as well.
      Once you know your needs for your situation you just simply try a few & to do load development for each then work out your best result & go for that one
      You always need to keep in mind that a certain weight projectile will require a certain rate of twist from the barrel otherwise it wont fly properly, that sort info on twist rate/projectile suitability is available via a web search.
      Thats where powder choice come in, while you can use 1 powder for several calibers there will sometimes be some sort of trade off like reduced accuracy & or speed but thats explained in the ADI load data.
      Just keep reading, 2 or 3 reloading books is really all you need & as the others have passed on that free ADI manual is a great source.

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      • #10
        As previously mentioned, Nick Harvey's reloading manual is essential for a beginner. Read it before you buy any reloading equipment. One big thing is case preparation, and setting the dies correctly.

        I've seen so many fuck ups occur when people don't follow the basics.

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        • #11
          Is that really your Uncle, Skip? Cool!

          Mine arrived this morning (I do love the smell of gunpowder in the morning) and Ive almost finished reading it, you MUST buy it as its really great for us Aussies.


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          Do not pass GO. Do not collect $200.

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