Redding F/L & Neck Bushing dies

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  • Redding F/L & Neck Bushing dies

    Gday,

    I am trying to expand my reloading knowledge and my next thing is looking into these bush/body dies. A part of this stems from me wanting to neck turn the outside of my case necks and from the information I have gathered this is a useless step if I am to use expander dies. I want to achieve uniform neck tension to the best of my ability so how do I achieve that? I currently have transitioned over to Lee collet dies for neck sizing but want to know can I improve consistency using a Redding type S bushing die

    Especially for my .204ruger and my .300wm (when I get it back from my smithy).

    I get confused when I am told I have to select a bushing- I thought there would be one bushing for each die and caliber. Am I wrong? Are there several bushings for each caliber specific die?

    Is this the same process for neck and F/L dies?

    Will I achieve any further benefits by using these types of Dies???

    Cheers

  • #2
    neck turning wont be useless with a non-bushing type die - you'll still get more consistency in neck tension, but with a bushing type die it will let you control the amount of neck tension you use reasonably precisely

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    • #3
      You can order custom size mandrels from Lee. They have both larger and smaller to either increase of decrease the tension.

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      • #4
        The lee collet dies are good if you dont want to neck turn as the inside of the necks are sized to the exact size of the collet meaning irregular case neck thickness doesn't make any difference. The redding bushing dies need a uniform outside neck diameter as they are re-sized to a size inside the bushing, so case thickness unifomity is important if you want to maximise accuracy.

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        • #5
          Short answer is yes, using the dies you have mentioned will help improve consistency, especially if you choose to neck turn.

          Not sure what you mean by expander dies, these are used to expand the neck so the neck turning mandrel will fit, once turned you size down.

          If you have a standard factory chamber, you best bet is to turn for a clean up i.e. an 80-90% clean up of the neck as opposed to turning down to a size. this way you will only be working the brass a minimal amount (Do you understand the difference between a factory and a match chamber?)

          There are multiple bushings for each calibre for various reasons such as, neck tension, minimal neck expansion for sized brass/chamber etc.

          A standard .30cal rifle should have a chamber size of around .343" you can tell this by measuring the neck of a fired case, it will give you a close indication, but you must allow a small amount for spring in the brass approx. .001-.002" from there you can work out what you need to size down to achieve the tension you want and what works best in your rifle.

          Of course, you don't need to turn to get benefit from the bushing style dies.

          Here is a good article to kick you off with all the basics: www.6mmbr.com/neckturningbasics.html‎

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          • Guest's Avatar
            Guest commented
            Editing a comment
            Originally posted by jasmay" post=29765
            Short answer is yes, using the dies you have mentioned will help improve consistency, especially if you choose to neck turn.

            If you have a standard factory chamber, you best bet is to turn for a clean up i.e. an 80-90% clean up of the neck as opposed to turning down to a size. this way you will only be working the brass a minimal amount (Do you understand the difference between a factory and a match chamber?)
            Hi Jasmay,

            I have recently ordered some gear to start neck turning. I read the above with interest as when I was talking to BRT I was wondering if I really needed a tool to measure neck thickness. I thought that for my factory chamber I could just do what you have said above, I thought I could achieve this with some trial and error over 5 cases or so to just clean them up. Does this make sense?

        • #6
          the reason different neck bushings exist for each caliber is so that you can fine tune neck tension on the loaded bullet to suit your chamber and to improve concentricity of a loaded round

          lets say you have a factory rifle chambered in .243. the reamer used in your rifle cuts the neck .278", then you load your case with a bullet and it measures .274". all good, you have good clearance making the rifle safe to shoot but any variation in neck thickness may change this clearance

          consistent neck tension is essential to accuracy and since a neck bushing die sizes the case neck by pushing it down inside a bushing every neck is identical in outside dimension. but what is the neck thickness varies from case to case. then one bullet is held tightly in the neck, the next may be loose

          the first step here is neck turning. you must turn the necks to a consistent thickness then load a bullet and measure the outside of the neck. this becomes your base dimension for sizing bushing. then you can determine how much tension you desire. say the loaded round measures .270" maybe it's for a factory hunting gun that will be loaded from a magazine. then some neck tension may be required to stop recoil pushing the bullets back into the case. .002-.003" may be required then you would order a .267" bushing size a case and double check everything. you may decide to order a bushing .001" either side of your loaded size, or you may decide to go to the effort of returning all your cases .001" thinner to reduce tension further

          now what if you your gun is a target gun to be single loaded for F class for example you may decide .001" neck tension is enough without overworking your brass, you can probably order a neck bushing based on this measurement .you might order a .269" bushing.

          now things get interesting when your target gun has a tight neck chamber like my 6PPC which is cut for a .262" neck and it becomes critical that you cut the necks thin enough to maintain safe clearances upon firing and to give proper tension on the bullet

          hope that makes some sense

          steve

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          • jasmay
            jasmay commented
            Editing a comment
            Butta, you are only going to get part stories and a generalization of what neck turning is on a forum, there are many points to it, best to read a few articles regarding it that have been written in completion.....
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