Sourcing 2nd Hand Reload Gear

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  • Sourcing 2nd Hand Reload Gear

    Hey people,

    I've been trawling through a lot of used gun sites and haven't been having much luck finding any decent 2nd hand reloading gear. A press is the biggest item, i guess but there don't seem to be many on offer. Seen a few Dillon set ups for sale but that's beyond my budget and needs, even at used prices.

    Anyone suggest a site to keep an eye one that i may have missed? Failing that, anyone looking to upgrade and want to sell their press?

    Thanks,

    Gwion
    List to tick off:
    - TICK!!! NEW SCOPE: Sightron S-tac 2.5-17.5 X 56mm
    - TICK !!Left handed 223rem, Zastava M85
    - wildcat build in progress: 223McShort
    - TICK!!! Rebarrel Howa to 7mm-08
    - TICK!!! case trimmer/turner
    - Comp dies for 7mm-08
    - Case annealer
    - Custom dies for wild cat

  • #2
    The classifieds of your usual shooting sports forum is a great place to start.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think the main issue is that people only tend to sell their gear when it wearing out or not good quality to start with. I'm going to start soon myself, but I'm going new and probably Lyman (their kit is probably the best value for money at the moment). I think the previous post tells you where to look for second hand gear... Ebay wouldn't have much as their fees are ridiculous. Good luck.

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      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Well I cant tell where you are from but there are some gun & knife shows that happen all around the place at different locations(NSW,QLD,VIC,WA).
        The list is advertised in the monthly SSAA Australian shooter magazine.
        I have been to the one at Penrith Panthers in Sydney & there were heaps of 2nd hand die sets & other reloading gear on offer!
        Could be worth checking out!!

      • Gwion
        Gwion commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree on both counts. Classifieds (waiting, waiting) would be good, also a lot of clapped out stuff would just be turfed. I do occasionally hear of people upgrading for the sake of faster process, etc. As a learner, the slower i go the better is my theory.
        Anyway, hopefully something crops up that is reasonable. Just want to start learning the process and saving a bit on ammo costs.

        Cheers

        Gwion

    • #4
      If your keen to start reloading, and the budget is at full stretch already, I would suggest the lee kit, its not flash but everything works. For less than the cost of another brands press, your in the game and learning. You can add to the kit or replace components later if required. Plenty of decent ammo has been reloaded on this gear, but I would recommend a powder trickler, those lee scales take a while to settle.

      Comment


      • Gwion
        Gwion commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks NBT.
        I was leaning towards the Lee kit for the exact reasons you stated. I'm just trying to exhaust all other avenues to get something a little better before i make a final choice.

        Cheers

        Gwion

    • #5
      Dont be scared of getting the LEE kit, for the little amount of stress that working on .223 cases involves the press will last forever- especially if you keep it oiled up at the pivot points, and nip up the clamping bolts on the handle every now and then.

      I have found that the blokes that bag Lee stuff, usually either have never used it - or failed to maintain it, or made dumb mistakes and blamed the tools.

      I bought my lee anniversary kit in the early 90's and it is still used for all my .223 ammo, and sizing / gas checking of .303 and .38 projies, and experimental loads for many calibres.
      The only Lee product I have ever had problems with was the finicky primer feed on a pro1000 press- but I removed the feed as I prefer to prime by hand anyway.

      The Lee kit, with Lee collet dies, a F.L. sizing die, and a factory crimp die will be almost everything you need to get up and running.
      [case trimming and chamfering will be needed at some stage- IIRC, some of this comes with the kit too.]

      You will most likely only need to neck size for the first 4 to 5 reloads, so the collet die will get the most use.- especially if you are using the pack of 500 cases from AV's.
      Once you notice its getting harder to chamber your reloads- then its time to full length resize/ check case length and trim if needed.

      stephen
      all times wasted wots not spent shootin'

      Comment


      • Gwion
        Gwion commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by [email protected]" post=30940
        Dont be scared of getting the LEE kit, for the little amount of stress that working on .223 cases involves the press will last forever- especially if you keep it oiled up at the pivot points, and nip up the clamping bolts on the handle every now and then.

        I have found that the blokes that bag Lee stuff, usually either have never used it - or failed to maintain it, or made dumb mistakes and blamed the tools.

        I bought my lee anniversary kit in the early 90's and it is still used for all my .223 ammo, and sizing / gas checking of .303 and .38 projies, and experimental loads for many calibres.
        The only Lee product I have ever had problems with was the finicky primer feed on a pro1000 press- but I removed the feed as I prefer to prime by hand anyway.

        The Lee kit, with Lee collet dies, a F.L. sizing die, and a factory crimp die will be almost everything you need to get up and running.
        [case trimming and chamfering will be needed at some stage- IIRC, some of this comes with the kit too.]

        You will most likely only need to neck size for the first 4 to 5 reloads, so the collet die will get the most use.- especially if you are using the pack of 500 cases from AV's.
        Once you notice its getting harder to chamber your reloads- then its time to full length resize/ check case length and trim if needed.

        stephen
        Thanks for the tips but they came about 5 hours too late! I just ordered the R BS kit this morning. It's going to leave short of beer money for awhile but decided to buy the best I could afford (or not, as the case may be).

        Cheers
        Gwion

    • #6
      What you have written makes a lot of sense... You take the time to maintain your press, it will serve you well (same goes for everything I guess). The other thing is the old saying you get what you pay for which is where most people would make their judgement.

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