Digital Scales Thoughts?

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  • Digital Scales Thoughts?

    Hey guys,

    What digital scales is everyone using? Not after a dispenser scale, will hand trickle to final weight myself.

    Budget would be around 150 ish. Considering the Hornady Lock N Load?

    Cheers Pete

  • #2
    Hi Pete,
    I think if you forking out $150 any digital scale will be OK, just keep it out of the wind.

    Comment


    • #3
      It all depends on what purpose and what degree of accuracy you require to achieve.

      Any cheap digital scales, up to a few hundred dollar versions are still cheap as far as accuracy and consistancy goes. Most digital scales say accuracy to 0.1gr but that is actually +/- 0.1gr consistancy which relates to as much as 0.2gr consistancy and some even of the same brand and model can be much worse. Better are those that will measure 0.02gr accuracy which gives you a better indication of weight but very few state what their consistancy is rated at.

      Generally if you require precision accuracy then you will need to look at scientific scales of several hundreds of dollars to around a thousand.

      I have no experience with the Hornady Lock n Load Bench Scales but I do have the Hornady Electronic Scale GS-1500 and this particular set is reasonably consistant with it's +/- 0.1gr if used in very short bursts. If left on for 10-15 minutes the consistancy gets much worse. Okay in my view for doing quick measurements and weighing for batching cases, rough sorting bullets and a quick check of a powder weight but that's it. They are not accurate enough for my presision target reloading use.

      Some have reported many scales just drift all over the place so be warned about low price digital scales.

      If you are reloading large calibre for hunting then any of these may be fine if you can stand a differency of at least 0.2gr or more in your measured loads.

      Far more accurate and consistant is a good Balance Beam Scale like Redding Model 2 Powder & Bullet Scales, RCBS etc and it's easy to maintain a consistancy of 0.02gr between powder loads. You can actually see the difference in weight of just a few granules of powder being added.

      For my precision target reloading I would love a set of digital scales accurate to at least 0.02gr if their consistancy was just as good and I am still looking at some around the $500 or so mark. Very hard to justify when I already have Balance Beam Scales that do the same job but not at quick.

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      • #4
        I am very fond of my RCBS 750. No clue what that costs in your dollars, but it was under 150 with our Fiat/monopoly money

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        • pete86
          pete86 commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by satchmo" post=19892
          I am very fond of my RCBS 750. No clue what that costs in your dollars, but it was under 150 with our Fiat/monopoly money
          Cheers mate. The RCBS 750 is another option. I would buy from the US at the moment as our doller is still going good. Even with 40 bucks postage, it would be cheaper then buying here.

      • #5
        digital scales are flawed for weighing powder charges. the software is designed to smooth out the signal from the scale and average it so the readout sticks on a measurement then stays there even as kernels of powder are added, the way around this is to remove the pan from the scale before trickling powder in then reweighing

        i did a fair bit of research when i was looking at digital scales, trust me when i say none of the reloading brand digital scales are accurate enough for weighing powder charges, despite what they say

        i got to the point of looking at high end labratory scales in the $1K + range and guess what? they had a resolution of .001gr. so what you may say, well .001gr equals .015 grains. hardly earth shatteringly accurate for the money you're paying but that's the kind or sensitivity i'd be asking for to check my beam scales

        have a read of the ten commandments for digital scales

        steve
        http://www.accurateshooter.com/technical-articles/reloading/ten-commandments-for-electronic-scales/

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        • Guest's Avatar
          Guest commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by 6602steven" post=19905
          digital scales are flawed for weighing powder charges. the software is designed to smooth out the signal from the scale and average it so the readout sticks on a measurement then stays there even as kernels of powder are added, the way around this is to remove the pan from the scale before trickling powder in then reweighing
          Explains my experience with digitals, trickling powder they would fail to respond to added powder and then a tiny bit more would see them jump by 0.3gr.
          I've now relegated them to batching brass and checking cast projectile weights and gone back to balance beam for weighing powder.
          I've now had 3 different digital scales ranging in price from $60-300 and all have eventually become to inaccurate to use for weighing powder, I did get a better run out of the dear model but they eventually started fluctuating as well.

      • #6
        Gday mate,

        I bought the RCBS Charge master combo from the US.... Think it cost me $389+ Postage........ You pay $700 here, well you did back when I bought them. Not sure what the combo is now.

        I love the automatic dispense mode it really helps speed up the process. These scales are +.1 to -.1 of a grain accuracy............... In saying that I still measure every load with my beam scales but reloading is so much more enjoyable. I took that advice from Mega when I purchased them.

        I usually set the scales for .1 of a grain less than the required load then trickle the rest in the pan on my beam scales. While im doing this though, the next charge is being dispensed....

        Cheers....

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        • #7
          Hi All,

          I have been using these Chinese made scales for about 3.5 years without a drama. Sometimes a little slow to settle and not always the most sensitive,, but they measure to 0.01Gr and have never let me down yet. Cost at the time was about $65 from E-Bay.

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          • #8
            I have been using the Dillion Precision, (D.Terminator) for about 10 years graduation from 0.01 grains / 0.01 gram. Very accurate and consistant, in use at least once a week. I load 9mm..38 super and .45 acp, when I first started I used to cross check the measurement with the old fashion cross beam scales, the digital were obviousley more accurate and easier to use. Just checked with Dillion curent retail $215.00 Aussie dollar responsible for that. Hope that helps.

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            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              I got a cheap one off ebay just to keep the lee scales honest. They have done exactly that, sometimes they show 1 grain over, so I put it back on the lee and it is.
              Used together ,I think it's fine but not as a single source of measurement.

            • pete86
              pete86 commented
              Editing a comment
              Originally posted by Robar" post=20371
              I have been using the Dillion Precision, (D.Terminator) for about 10 years graduation from 0.01 grains / 0.01 gram. Very accurate and consistant, in use at least once a week. I load 9mm..38 super and .45 acp, when I first started I used to cross check the measurement with the old fashion cross beam scales, the digital were obviousley more accurate and easier to use. Just checked with Dillion curent retail $215.00 Aussie dollar responsible for that. Hope that helps.
              I have read good things about them. The only problem is the good things said are about the old ones like you have! Apparently the latest versions have gone cheap and have alot more problems. Dont build stuff like the use too

          • #9
            I'm using the Hornady Lock N Load to dispense just short of what I am after and then switching over to a Gem Pro 250 for the final weigh. It is a great little unit. It can pick up the difference in just a few grains of powder. Just the other day I was loading some 300 win mag with 2213SC and I can tell you that each little kernel of powder weighs 0.04 grains.

            I got the Gem Pro off Ebay. The power supply is universal input. Just need an adapter to suit our plugs.

            Comment


            • pete86
              pete86 commented
              Editing a comment
              Originally posted by Action John" post=20567
              I'm using the Hornady Lock N Load to dispense just short of what I am after and then switching over to a Gem Pro 250 for the final weigh. It is a great little unit. It can pick up the difference in just a few grains of powder. Just the other day I was loading some 300 win mag with 2213SC and I can tell you that each little kernel of powder weighs 0.04 grains.

              I got the Gem Pro off Ebay. The power supply is universal input. Just need an adapter to suit our plugs.
              Good to know. cheers

          • #10
            There is a reason most chemists and laboratories still use quality triple beamers, Digi scales are handy and "close but no cigar"
            do un to others as you would have others do un to you.

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            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              I've been using a gempro 250 for nearly a year - I think it's excellent. measures to within 0.02gr accurately and although it seems to take about 5 seconds to recalculate, it actually registers a single kernel of 2209. You seem to have to press tare a few times before you start weighing charges but it settles down after this. I test it occasionally by re weighing the same charges to see if it gives you different weight but it's always remarkably consistent.

              It will drift over the course of a reloading session though - its obvious because when you lift the powder pan off the scales it sometimes shows a different 'negative' weight. 90% of the time it's no more than 0.02gr (which is the equivalent of about 1 kernel of extruded powder) if its more than this I'll press the tare button again. I've left mine plugged into the mains since I took it out of the box and its been more or less trouble free besides the above idiosyncrasies
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