1st reloading kit (for .222Rem, .223Rem and possibly 30-06)

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  • 1st reloading kit (for .222Rem, .223Rem and possibly 30-06)

    Which would you choose and why? I estimate I will be reloading about 1500 rounds per year for all the three calibers.

    Hornady ~ Lock-N-Load Classic Reloading Kit
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Hornady-Lock-N-Load-Classic-Reloading-Kit-Rifle-Press-085003-/171103257186?pt=AU_Hunting&hash=item27d68c8262

    LEE 50th Anniversary Breech Lock Reloading Kit
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/LEE-50th-Anniversary-Breech-Lock-Reloading-Kit-90050-New-/230969247935?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35c6d708bf

    RCBS PARTNER PRESS RELOADING KIT
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/RCBS-PARTNER-PRESS-RELOADING-KIT-87467-/370905548855?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item565bb18837

    RCBS ROCK CHUCKER SUPREME MASTER RELOADING KIT
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/RCBS-ROCK-CHUCKER-SUPREME-MASTER-RELOADING-KIT-PRESS-SCALE-POWDER-MEASURE-NEW-/151056907831?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item232bb17e37

  • #2
    Lee

    Coz it works ......

    You could buy any of the others and spend much more. If its for a hunting gun I very much doubt you'll be able to tell where the few extra $$$ hundred has gone.

    I use lee and number of dies ( it makes rounds ) the bullets hit what I point at. There's no voodoo here ... Just how deep the wallet is and if you want to follow the hype.

    What ever you end up with .... Buy a good manual like uncle Nicks. Every Aussie shooter, should own a copy.

    Don't rush ( not a race ) you'll get good results.

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      Originally posted by El-Skippo " post=11781
      Lee

      Coz it works ......

      You could buy any of the others and spend much more. If its for a hunting gun I very much doubt you'll be able to tell where the few extra $$$ hundred has gone.

      I use lee and number of dies ( it makes rounds ) the bullets hit what I point at. There's no voodoo here ... Just how deep the wallet is and if you want to follow the hype.

      What ever you end up with .... Buy a good manual like uncle Nicks. Every Aussie shooter, should own a copy.

      Don't rush ( not a race ) you'll get good results.
      I'll second this. I started with one of these too just start off. 4 additional presses later +++ all the other gear and I still use the LEE gear for most of my rifles. As Skip says.. It works.

  • #3
    - For lee, I usually get all of their gear from Titan Reloading - http://www.titanreloading.com/kits/lee-breech-lock-challenger-50th-anniversary-kit

    - I like the really heavy [strong] cast 'O' style presses such as RCB/Hornady/Redding for durability. Second hand you can pick them up for $80-140 and will last a lifetime.

    - If you're going to spend $550+ go RL 550B Dillion progressive, perhaps not as a beginner [wish I did now tbh], but after seeing them in action, they would be worth every cent and will be my next press. - http://saffiretrading.com.au/ speak to the guy there [Mario I think] he's very knowledgeable and will show you the presses, they're in Moorabbin.

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    • #4
      A lot of my gear is Lee, easy to source spare parts, does a good job but I sprung for the classic cast press, not a fan of alloy after I broke the handle on the hand held jobbie. Can't say what the lee scales and powder thrower are like, can say Lyman scales are good.

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        Bought the Lee Challenger kit... thanks guys.

    • #5
      Good job . I just ordered the very same press kit, a set of 223 dies and two extra quick change collets last night myself .
      Mine will be my first go as well and I not long picked up my first .223 which prompted me to look at reloading .
      Let us know how it goes .

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        Originally posted by jaso1" post=12347
        Good job . I just ordered the very same press kit, a set of 223 dies and two extra quick change collets last night myself .
        Mine will be my first go as well and I not long picked up my first .223 which prompted me to look at reloading .
        Let us know how it goes .
        What state are you in jaso? Yeah I'll let you know how she goes!

    • #6
      The powder dropper on that Lee kit is absolute rubbish as it drops very inconsistent loads, and tends to leak. I wound up finding a used RCBS dropper for 50 dollars US, which is about half off.

      Couldn't be happier now.

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      • #7
        I'm in Vic , down in Latrobe valley . Mine should be here next week sometime, I have a mate that has been reloading a bit for a while so I'm going to try to get him to give me a run down on how he does his home loads then get into it myself .

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        • #8
          I would choose none of them as no single kit or manuafcturer has every product that is quality .
          You may save a bit of money now but later you buy other stuff to replace the parts that are not so good.
          Buy seperate products based on value for money and the exact type of gear you need .
          RCBS or Redding press
          Rediing powder measure and stand .
          Redding , RCBS , Lyman scales
          Redding dies . Lee Collet die only ( combine with Redding body die ) , Lee factory crimp die only if required .
          RCBS , Hornady , Wilson chamfer tool.
          Wilson ( most accurate ) Redding , RCBS , Lyman case trimmer .
          That will get you some basic quality stuff but too late you already went with cheap not quality .

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          • #9
            I know mate but I am only chasing MOA and I feel confident I will get it with my setup.

            Comment


            • El-Skippo
              Skip commented
              Editing a comment
              Originally posted by Remo" post=12650
              I know mate but I am only chasing MOA and I feel confident I will get it with my setup.
              If you take your time and get a little in depth in the RnD ... You'll get less then MOA with the kit you got. ( shooter also needs to be able to shoot as good as the ammo he makes ) less then MOA can be done.

              I don't have fancy expensive reloading gear nor expensive built rifles ( they hold there own at the range ) the rich guys with all the bells and whistles that buy the best of everything know it. I am not the most anal person coming to case prep ( pretty basic ) compaired too lengths some others do.

              The game I shoot also know it.

              Rnd and trigger time will make you a great combo, that will pay off in the end.

              With the gear I got I get 1/2-1/4 moa with factory rifles and semi custom rifles.

              You'll be right mate

            • Guest's Avatar
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              My comments were not about accuracy potential . They were about lasting quality and ease of use mainly.
              Lee gear will load quite accurate ammo and most of the load in accuracy is not in the gear it's in the skill of the operator .
              I will give you one tip that will save your Lee press and your brass from wear and tear over the years don't use a traditional Full Length sizing die .
              If loading for a bolt action use what ever neck die you want but use a Redding body die for the remainder of the case . It takes a lot of load of the press and your arm and is a superior way to do it.

          • #10
            Ok I've just finished my first 70 hand loads for my .222. This set was just to learn and practice so I didn't do much variation. My brew was 30 @ 18.5 grains and 40 @ 19 grains of ADI 2207 under a Hornady 50 grain V-Max seated .6mm back from the lands. Also used Remington 6 1/2 small rifle primers (just what the guy gave me).

            Next time I think I'll try these benchrest primers and the Nosler 50gn BST projectiles. I'll prob stick with the ADI2207 until I've used it all up.

            To figure out my COAL I took an unprimed and resized case and put it in my lathe. I then took a 5.5mm drill bit and used that to slightly decrease the neck ID to a point where the projectile could just move under finger pressure but still has enough interference fit to hold it's position. I pulled the projectile quite far out and then put the case in my chamber and closed the bolt. This pushed the prodjie up to the lands and then back into the neck. This gave me my COAL for these prodjies. Can anyone see anything wrong with this method of determining COAL?

            Also I agree the scale and powder thrower do not fill me with confidence, as these are the 1st I've ever used I can't make a direct comparison but they just felt a bit flimsy although the scale did register changes of 4-5 kernels of powder. I just made the thrower throw slightly undersized charges and then I topped them up from a primed case that was filled with powder, this was WAY easier than topping it up with a spoon. You just tap the case like you would a cigarette on an ash tray and a few kernels pop out.

            I had some questions thought. I got the RCBS dies which were a 2 piece kit, full length sizing and seating. My questions are:
            • Should I now get a neck sizing die?
            • When should you be using a full length sizing die as opposed to a neck sizing die?
            • What is a factory crimp die and when do you need to use one?


            BTW here is my very first reload next to some factory bangers... I was so proud! Sorted the problem out very quickly!

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              Originally posted by Remo" post=13085
              Ok I've just finished my first 70 hand loads for my .222. This set was just to learn and practice so I didn't do much variation. My brew was 30 @ 18.5 grains and 40 @ 19 grains of ADI 2207 under a Hornady 50 grain V-Max seated .6mm back from the lands. Also used Remington 6 1/2 small rifle primers (just what the guy gave me).

              Next time I think I'll try these benchrest primers and the Nosler 50gn BST projectiles. I'll prob stick with the ADI2207 until I've used it all up.

              To figure out my COAL I took an unprimed and resized case and put it in my lathe. I then took a 5.5mm drill bit and used that to slightly decrease the neck ID to a point where the projectile could just move under finger pressure but still has enough interference fit to hold it's position. I pulled the projectile quite far out and then put the case in my chamber and closed the bolt. This pushed the prodjie up to the lands and then back into the neck. This gave me my COAL for these prodjies. Can anyone see anything wrong with this method of determining COAL?

              Also I agree the scale and powder thrower do not fill me with confidence, as these are the 1st I've ever used I can't make a direct comparison but they just felt a bit flimsy although the scale did register changes of 4-5 kernels of powder. I just made the thrower throw slightly undersized charges and then I topped them up from a primed case that was filled with powder, this was WAY easier than topping it up with a spoon. You just tap the case like you would a cigarette on an ash tray and a few kernels pop out.

              I had some questions thought. I got the RCBS dies which were a 2 piece kit, full length sizing and seating. My questions are:
              • Should I now get a neck sizing die?
              • When should you be using a full length sizing die as opposed to a neck sizing die?
              • What is a factory crimp die and when do you need to use one?


              BTW here is my very first reload next to some factory bangers... I was so proud! Sorted the problem out very quickly!

              The only bit I am concerned with is in red . Do you mean you topped up the required powder load into the scale which was set to the correct amount of grains you needed and then poured that into the case ?
              You don't need a factory crimp die I was only saying that of the Lee dies , those two are good.
              You neck size until the case starts to get a bit sticky you will feel it harder to extract or harder to chamber then you go to the Full lenght die , set it up using that hard to chamber case and size it only enough to get easy chambering again then run the rest through .
              There is so many wild opinions on loading dies and sytems but in my 45 years of reloading I have thrown away most of my standard full lenght sizing dies or converted them to body dies . The problem is in this day and age that new reloaders are rushing in very keen to do things and they are missing out on the best advice and info . Sometimes it's better to go slow and learn more before you buy your stuff .
              If you only have a full lenght die in the set now then I would say yes buy a neck size only die . Some people will argue the roof down that full lenght sizing is better but in the end the case will last longer if you cut down on the amount of sizing you have to do .

          • #11
            Thanks for the replies..

            Do you mean you topped up the required powder load into the scale which was set to the correct amount of grains you needed and then poured that into the case ?
            yes that is correct.. I was aiming for 19grains so I set the powder dispenser to throw approx (it only seems to throw approximates anyhow) 18.5 grains, then I topped the scale up to the target of 19 grains, then I poured it into the case. I see what you're saying about my 'top up case'. I was very careful and went slowly and methodically, placing each charged case into a separate tray. I only just found out about those powder trickles, they seem like a much better idea. I'll def grab one when I grab the neck sizing die. Until then I will simply use an empty case with a fired primer and I'll put some high-viz tape around it which will remove any danger of me loading it in error.

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              Originally posted by Remo" post=13134
              Thanks for the replies..

              Do you mean you topped up the required powder load into the scale which was set to the correct amount of grains you needed and then poured that into the case ?
              yes that is correct.. I was aiming for 19grains so I set the powder dispenser to throw approx (it only seems to throw approximates anyhow) 18.5 grains, then I topped the scale up to the target of 19 grains, then I poured it into the case. I see what you're saying about my 'top up case'. I was very careful and went slowly and methodically, placing each charged case into a separate tray. I only just found out about those powder trickles, they seem like a much better idea. I'll def grab one when I grab the neck sizing die. Until then I will simply use an empty case with a fired primer and I'll put some high-viz tape around it which will remove any danger of me loading it in error.
              No worries mate you sound like a switched on guy so no drama .
              You don't have to use scale weighed loads if you don't want to when staying well under max charges.
              You can set the measure using the scale , throw a few charges into the scale pan to check it's correct and then just put each case under the measure one at a time and work the handle.
              It's a personal choice but that's the way I do it .

          • #12
            Quick question... when I'm at the range testing loads for my .222. What is a suitable amount of cool down time between 5 shot groups? Also how often should I scrub the barrel between shots? every 20?

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