Refurbishing Ammo Boxes

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  • Refurbishing Ammo Boxes

    I did a job recently in a storage warehouse for a large group of theatres and movie sets redesigning and organising a workshop. In the process I picked up a post WW2 mine chest and .50 cal ammo box. They are pretty beat up and I have been looking to re-stencil my other boxes so my question is this:

    How do I strip back all the rust/old paint, protect the boxes from further rust and prime for spray painting/stencilling?

  • #2
    Hit them with paint stripper, treat the rust with a good rust converter after getting off any loose materiel, then wipe the whole thing down with prepsol and put a coat of rustkill primer on it. After that, spray them any colour you want, but you're best sticking to OD if you want them to keep their authentic look, it helps to rub them down with some 800 grit wet and dry after the paint has finished curing, this will take off the gloss, and the "newly painted" look and make them look their age a bit more.

    This is all in the assumption that you're not concerned about any antique value that they might have. In some cases you're better off leaving them, because they look pretty cool when they're all beaten up.

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      Originally posted by martyphillips83" post=44585
      Hit them with paint stripper, treat the rust with a good rust converter after getting off any loose materiel, then wipe the whole thing down with prepsol and put a coat of rustkill primer on it. After that, spray them any colour you want, but you're best sticking to OD if you want them to keep their authentic look, it helps to rub them down with some 800 grit wet and dry after the paint has finished curing, this will take off the gloss, and the "newly painted" look and make them look their age a bit more.

      This is all in the assumption that you're not concerned about any antique value that they might have. In some cases you're better off leaving them, because they look pretty cool when they're all beaten up.
      Thanks mate, Ill pick up everything I need and try it out!

      Ammo boxes are pretty common and I really don't think they will skyrocket in value anytime soon. So this is a project for long term storage of ammo in cans that should last a little longer and will be properly labeled..

  • #3
    Since where on the subject of ammo boxes, just querious what the value of them are ? particularly the .303 ball Mk7 BDR dated 31.8.56 wooden ammo box in really good condition for the age of it ?

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      Originally posted by 2valve" post=45294
      Since where on the subject of ammo boxes, just querious what the value of them are ? particularly the .303 ball Mk7 BDR dated 31.8.56 wooden ammo box in really good condition for the age of it ?
      Well the metal ammo boxes that are post WWII (basically what we all pick up at surplus stores) are pretty much worth nothing about $10-25 depending on condition and size. The big .30 cals can go for $40. If you can get the WWII metal ammo boxes they can fetch a little more.

      Check this out for a little info: http://browningmgs.com/AmmoCans/T-Chial/AmmoBoxes.htm

      In terms of wooden boxes its really anyones guess, all depends on the quality of the markings and box. Its very hard to sell militaria like that though, very specific buyer and who knows what price.

  • #4
    If you have access to a pressure sprayer, you could try it as the first step. At close range it will lift any loose paint or rust fast, just wont make it smooth. Depends on the result your after.

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    • #5
      Personally.

      take to local powdercoat shop. They will blast, acid bath and apply a durable coating in almost any color you can imagine.

      done

      edit...
      of course that's if it holds no collectors value or personal value to you.
      .177 Chinese Air Rifle, Marlin XT22, Savage Mk2
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