Real guns

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Real guns

    I have two genuine Lithgow HT low mount sniper rifles and a built up high mount sniper rifle as well.

    One of the low mount rifles is pretty much untouched from when it left the factory. The second was a bitser and was missing lots of its genuine parts therefore it had lost most of its collectability besides what the rifle actually was.

    I decided to have the rifle rebuilt and after sourcing some parts from some good friends, from Ebay and from usedguns.com.au I sent the package away to be put together. Here are a few pics of the process and the finished results.

    I tried to put it into the collectors part of the forum but it wouldn't allow me. Mods please feel free to move it using your magical powers.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    finished results
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #3
      More
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        i used to like you..

    • #4
      A.W.E.S.O.M.E.!!!

      Steve

      Comment


      • #5
        Thanks for preserving a bit of history pusser
        Fish
        Sent via pony express and mail plane

        You know that moment when the steak is on the grill and your mouth waters in anticipation? Vegans feel the same after mowing the lawn.

        Comment


        • #6
          moved to the correct section

          thanks

          Anthony

          Comment


          • #7
            That was part of the brief. It was not to be a show pony, It will get regular use.

            Comment


            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              Sweet as! Some lovely work there.

              Just a suggestion to yourself and indeed anyone taking a photo of a firearm... where possible, use a mid-toned backdrop.

              Light coloured or white backdrops will cause your camera to underexpose the image; as most firearms are fairly "dark" in overall tone - think blued steel, stained wood or black synthetic stocks - this means much subtle detail won't be easily visible.

              Conversely, a very dark or black background will force the camera's light meter to overexpose, rendering lighter details unnaturally bright and potentially "burning out" details.

              A mid grey, mute (think British) green or mid purple bit of cloth however more closely matches the overall 'tone' of the firearm itself, helping the camera achieve an even, accurate exposure and thus an image that more closely remembles what the human eye would see. Green or purple help to create some contrast and separation... a local gun shop uses a purple cloth to photograph their stock against for Facebook, etc. and it works rather well.

              Hmm... thinking I should do a bit of a How-To write up for the FAQ section...

          • #8
            Great, painstaking work on the sniper, pusser. Looks awesome.


            On photos, natural light is everything (which I have precious little of, can't take anything outside)

            Closest I get is inside on a fairly light carpet. Avoiding flash is the secret.

            Comment


            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              an excellent photo.

          • #9
            Love the work on the ol 3oh!

            As far as photos go, outide natural light works best, even with shitty compact cameras.

            Look at the contrast in background to the focus point of the rifles in this one, I've tried to highlight the rifles by making the backgound topical, but not set up. The tones in the wood really make the rest of the picture pop out. This picture has been reduced so the detail isnt as good as it was on the original.



            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF8534sml.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	73.6 KB
ID:	19874

            Comment


            • #10
              whats up!!!

              Comment


              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
                Editing a comment
                Indeed - unless you've got access to several flash strobes, softboxes and umbrellas, natural light on an overcast day will give you the best lighting.

            • #11
              Another
              Attached Files

              Comment


              • #12
                Greetings gents... There's nothing I like more than pics, (as most of the posters on this thread already know) being the proud owner of the infamous "green tarp" seen in a few you tube vids by Jollygreenslugg and numerous postings on forums like this. I'll stick up one that I think demonstrates the point headwerkn (btw, congrats on the site!) made above. Combination of natural light and the right background can get you good results very easily. I find on a bright sunny day, late afternoon in a shaded spot gives great results too. Sticking a dowel through the trigger guards sets all the rifles at an angle to show the full side, or even the upper edge rather than more bottom edge too.

                Now comes the test... can I work out how to post a pic....


                Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF0046a.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	28.4 KB
ID:	20274

                Comment

                Working...
                X