Another Polish M44! Dated 1953.

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  • Another Polish M44! Dated 1953.

    Hey everybody, was finally able to pick up the Polish M44 earlier today. Very lengthy waiting period for the darn permit.
    Anyway, she's dated 1953 and, like most Pole M44's, is absolutely mint and appears to be unissued. Great trigger and super smooth bolt. Very happy with this new entry into the collection.
    I know these have been popular with other members in recent times, and i can certainly see why.
    Here are a few pics that I took with the Samsung SII.





  • #2
    Congrats..another beautiful Polish M44. Quality all over, can't fault em. As you said.. How good is the action and trigger..bloody brilliant. Took all the cosmoline out of mine yesterday, that was fun I know a lot of people hate cleaning cosmoline, but I quite enjoy stripping them down, and giving a good clean. Kind of like a history dig, you never know what might be underneath. I spent most of Saturday cleaning and checking over my rifles. Not a bad day for me. I thought I found a Polish 91/30 the other day on a website and my heart starting racing...but it was a Hungarian 91/30 in a blonde stock, still nice though ( not in Australia unfortunately ).
    On that note has any one ever seen a Polish 91/30 in the flesh? I'm sure your M44 is a keeper, same year and serial KB as mine. 5288 in between though . Thanks for sharing.
    PS... What's the helmet in the background.

    Comment


    • Dreadnought1
      Dreadnought1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Groggycoyote " post=42651
      On that note has any one ever seen a Polish 91/30 in the flesh?
      The only M91/30s used in Poland would have been of Soviet manufacture. Unlike the Hungarians, the Poles never built a long 7.62x54R Mosin Nagant.

      The First Polish Army on the Eastern Front from 1943 to 1945 were issued with Mosin Nagant M91/30s amongst other firearms (such as the PPSh-41 and SVT-40) and these would have largely gone to the People's Army of Poland when that was founded after WW2.




    • TheSovietSamurai
      TheSovietSamurai commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Groggycoyote " post=42651
      PS... What's the helmet in the background.
      The helmet is a Czech Vz-53 combat helmet, practically the same as the Polish Wz-50, and an improvement on the Soviet Ssh-40.
      Marked with 'roj Zival L' on the liner.

  • #3
    Gorgeous, Sam! Just as well you live within spitting distance of a rifle range isnt it

    Im kinda glad my instinctual hunt for new guns lusting phase is now over, I can no longer be tempted by ads...no more room lol

    Comment


    • Throwingbrick
      Throwingbrick commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by zhuk" post=42660
      Gorgeous, Sam! Just as well you live within spitting distance of a rifle range isnt it

      Im kinda glad my instinctual hunt for new guns lusting phase is now over, I can no longer be tempted by ads...no more room lol
      would it be legal to open carry, with bolt open and ammo in a lockbox in a backpack or on you to go to the rifle range for him?

  • #4
    If someone has a M91/30 with a Radom manufactured receiver, I'd put my hand up for it too...as it'd be as rare as rocking-horse droppings...

    Polish M91/30 sniper rifles do exist and they had matching numbers with the scopes/scope-mounts (stamped on the left side of the receiver - unlike Soviet M91/30 snipers) and that they were generally considered to be Russian rifles that had been refurbed at Radom after the war. Radom did a fair bit of refurb work between 1946 and tooling up for the production of carbines & SMGs around 1948 - and we've seen Polish-refurbed Soviet-manufactured M1944 carbines.

    In regard to the production of M91/30 sniper rifles, from Russian-Mosin-nagant-forum.com...
    Without exception, all 91/30 PU sniper rifles are based on “high wall” round receivers. The bulk were based on actions manufactured in1942-1944, with a very few were made from 1945-1947, and some as late as 1958. Poland and East Germany refurbished Russian-made examples until at least the late 1960s, and Hungary manufactured its own version of the 91/30 PU – known as the M/52 – from at least 1952-1954. The Czechs also produced a sniper rifle similar to the 91/30 PU concept – the VZ54/57 – which had a different stock, scope mount and a Czech-designed 2.5 power telescopic sight. Compared with the PUs, these rifles are extremely rare. As with all Communist Bloc weaponry of the Cold War era, 91/30 PU sniper rifles were delivered in substantial numbers as military aid to bolster Communist causes in the Middle East, Vietnam, Cuba, Afghanistan and Korea. 91/30 PU sniper rifles were captured from Chinese and North Korean troops during the Korean War, and Hungarian-manufactured examples in particular were encountered in Vietnam.

    Were there Polish M91/30 sniper rifles? Yes!
    Were they definitely manufactured from scratch in Poland? In all probability, no...
    Would a Polish refurbed M91/30 sniper be marked with the circle 11 mark? Most likely...as they would have also been stamped with the scope number at the same time.

    Given that modern warfare had moved on beyond the extremely long bolt-action rifle by the 1950s, I wouldn't be surprised if the only people who had manufactured the full M91/30 after WW2 were the Hungarians (to whom the rifle was the '48.M', also used them as the basis for their own M91/30 sniper and produced them in conjunction with their M1944 clone, the '44.M'), Albanians, Romanians and the North Koreans (supposedly as the 'Type 30' - and we all know how desperate the DPRK is...). Remember too that the last three regimes listed have/had serious fixations with 'self-sufficiency' and that meant that they probably would build anything they possibly could... Also remember both Hungary and Romania had been on the Axis side for most of WW2 and the Soviets may still have had issues with giving them too much in the way of vveapon technology...

    So......it is possible that the Poles did make M91/30 rifles (could even have been a run of 100 or less for test purposes) but if so, it would have been a very expensive proposition given the ready availability of ex-Soviet M91/30 snipers - and no specific examples have been noted or photographed by 7.62x54R.net, russian-mosin-nagant-forum.com or Terrence W Lapin (author of 'The Mosin Nagant Rifle').

    I'd put them in the same category as the 7.62x39mm Mosin Nagant prototypes built by the USSR and Finland after the war.
    I haven't seen any photos or documentary evidence but if they do exist, I'd still want one...
    Member of the Aunty Jack Firearm Appreciation Society - "Now be a good little Aussie and learn how to shoot or I'll rip your bloody arms off......and I will too!"

    "Have you tried unloading it then reloading it?" - Roy Trenneman on fixing firearm problems

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Dreadnought1" post=42983
      If someone has a M91/30 with a Radom manufactured receiver, I'd put my hand up for it too...as it'd be as rare as rocking-horse droppings...

      Polish M91/30 sniper rifles do exist and they had matching numbers with the scopes/scope-mounts (stamped on the left side of the receiver - unlike Soviet M91/30 snipers) and that they were generally considered to be Russian rifles that had been refurbed at Radom after the war. Radom did a fair bit of refurb work between 1946 and tooling up for the production of carbines & SMGs around 1948 - and we've seen Polish-refurbed Soviet-manufactured M1944 carbines.

      In regard to the production of M91/30 sniper rifles, from Russian-Mosin-nagant-forum.com...
      Without exception, all 91/30 PU sniper rifles are based on “high wall” round receivers. The bulk were based on actions manufactured in1942-1944, with a very few were made from 1945-1947, and some as late as 1958. Poland and East Germany refurbished Russian-made examples until at least the late 1960s, and Hungary manufactured its own version of the 91/30 PU – known as the M/52 – from at least 1952-1954. The Czechs also produced a sniper rifle similar to the 91/30 PU concept – the VZ54/57 – which had a different stock, scope mount and a Czech-designed 2.5 power telescopic sight. Compared with the PUs, these rifles are extremely rare. As with all Communist Bloc weaponry of the Cold War era, 91/30 PU sniper rifles were delivered in substantial numbers as military aid to bolster Communist causes in the Middle East, Vietnam, Cuba, Afghanistan and Korea. 91/30 PU sniper rifles were captured from Chinese and North Korean troops during the Korean War, and Hungarian-manufactured examples in particular were encountered in Vietnam.

      Were there Polish M91/30 sniper rifles? Yes!
      Were they definitely manufactured from scratch in Poland? In all probability, no...
      Would a Polish refurbed M91/30 sniper be marked with the circle 11 mark? Most likely...as they would have also been stamped with the scope number at the same time.

      Given that modern warfare had moved on beyond the extremely long bolt-action rifle by the 1950s, I wouldn't be surprised if the only people who had manufactured the full M91/30 after WW2 were the Hungarians (to whom the rifle was the '48.M', also used them as the basis for their own M91/30 sniper and produced them in conjunction with their M1944 clone, the '44.M'), Albanians, Romanians and the North Koreans (supposedly as the 'Type 30' - and we all know how desperate the DPRK is...). Remember too that the last three regimes listed have/had serious fixations with 'self-sufficiency' and that meant that they probably would build anything they possibly could... Also remember both Hungary and Romania had been on the Axis side for most of WW2 and the Soviets may still have had issues with giving them too much in the way of vveapon technology...

      So......it is possible that the Poles did make M91/30 rifles (could even have been a run of 100 or less for test purposes) but if so, it would have been a very expensive proposition given the ready availability of ex-Soviet M91/30 snipers - and no specific examples have been noted or photographed by 7.62x54R.net, russian-mosin-nagant-forum.com or Terrence W Lapin (author of 'The Mosin Nagant Rifle').

      I'd put them in the same category as the 7.62x39mm Mosin Nagant prototypes built by the USSR and Finland after the war.
      I haven't seen any photos or documentary evidence but if they do exist, I'd still want one...
      Thank you for your detailed informative response, as you said no specific examples have been noted or photographed. Good to dream though, rare as rocking horse droppings for sure :lol: . My first Terrence W Lapin book is due to arrive this week, looking forward to some good reading over the holidays. Going to take me a long time to gain the knowledge you guys have..

  • #5
    Hey Sov, Nice one and in excellent condition - commence flaming at the range at once!

    Comment


    • Field Marshal Cinque
      Field Marshal Cinque commented
      Editing a comment
      Nice score! I had a Polish m44 same year but mine was AB 16300. Mine wasn't half as good looking as that, did have the same red dot for safety mark. Did you get this from the Australian Arms Auctions earlier this year?

  • #6
    I don't see what you're getting at mate. 'Open carry' wouldn't be legal anywhere outside your own front door Lol

    Comment


    • Throwingbrick
      Throwingbrick commented
      Editing a comment
      im saying could he legally zip over the road with the gun over his shoulder with ammo and bolt in a strongbox to the gun range? the way you said it it sounds like he lives metres away.
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