Newspaper articles are the History of Shooting in Australia - from TROVE

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  • Newspaper articles are the History of Shooting in Australia - from TROVE

    Maybe you will find some family history here

    Edited Text by yours truly


    "RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES" 06 Jun 1925 - https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/58202094

    Mail (Adelaide, SA : 1912 - 1954), Saturday 6 June 1925, page 9

    RIFLE SHOOTING NOTES

    The recent illness of Mr. P. W. Topham (hon. secretary) has interfered considerably with organising work for the annual prize meeting of the Miniature Union. Intending competitors are notified that entries will be received on the range and club secretaries are asked to draw the attention of members to the meeting and thus, assist in making the fixture a success. The programme is at- tractive, and is or the same lines as last year, when an excellent entry was received.


    QUEENSLAND FIXTURE
    From the secretary (Mr. W. H. Gold) the programme of the forty-second annual prize meeting of the Southern Queensland Rifle Association has been received. Prize money for the fixture is £2,200. The main event is the King's prize, for which £620 has been provided. The stages are:— First 300, 500, and 600 yards, prize money £121, second 600 and 700 yards £65, third 700 and 900 yards £63. Competitors will be allowed ten shots at each distance. The first prize is the King's Aggregate is £50, and there are. various other awards amounting to £316. In A series there are six other individual events. The prize money and distances for these are:— No. 2, 300 yards, ten shots, £102; No. 3, 600 yards, ten shots, £102; No. 4, the same; No. 5, 700 yards, ten shots, £102; No. 6, 900 yards, £102. The next event the Commonwealth Ag gregate, carries a first prize of £30 and gold medal for the highest scorer in matches No. 2, 3, 4, and 5. Total awards are £225. B series is open to all riflemen (including interstate) who have not won a prize of £3 since December 31, 1921. The usual teams events are on the programme. COMMONWEALTH MATCH The State championship of Australia will be contested at the Brisbane meeting on Saturday, October 3. As far as is known all States will be represented, although Wes tern Australia is doubtful. South Australia won in 1907 with a record score, which stood until the same State eclipsed it in Perth in 1922. DISTANCES ALLOTTED At a meeting of the Metropolitan Union Council held during the week the following allotment of distances for the half-year end ing December 31 were made: — July 4, 700 yards; July 9, annual business meeting; July 11, 800 yards; July 25, 500 yards; August 1, 600 yards; August 8, 300 yards, first inter-club teams: August 15, 300 yards; August 22, 800 yards; August 29, 500 yards; September 5, 500 yards, second interclub teams; Sep tember 12. 900 yards; September 19, associa-tion prize meeting; September 26, 800 yards; October 3, 300 yards; October 10, 500 yards; October 17, 600 yards; October 24, 600 yards, third interclub teams; October 31, 200 yards; November 7, 300 yards, Metropolitan Handi-cap; November 14, 700 yards; November 21, 900 yards; November 28, 600 yards; December 5, 500 yards; December 12, 700 yards; Decem-ber 19, 800 yards; December 26, 200 yards. INTERSTATE MINIATURE The recent series of interstate matches for the B.S.A. Shield resulted in a tie between New South Wales and Victoria. The shoot-off will not take place until next week. UNIFORMITY IN RIFLES Speaking at a rifle club meeting in Mel-bourne last week, Col. Merret (chairman of Commonwealth Council of Rifle Associations) emphasised the necessity of a uniform rifle for civilian and military riflemen, and instanced the success achieved with long rifles after five inches of the barrel had been cut off. The War Office, he stated, was not altogether pleased with the light barrel of the short rifle. It is believed that the latest short rifles which are being made for the British Army are fitted with a much heavier barrel, which would add greatly to its efficiency. With regard to ammunition, it is reported that there are excellent pros-pects of the grant for each efficient being increased from 150 rounds to 250. There is no likelihood of mark VI, ammunition being issued for another six or seven years.


    CHAMPIONSHIP CONTESTS
    Nearly all of the metropolitan clubs com-plete the year in June, and for the nest few weeks championship finals will be the order of the day. Club secretaries are re-quested to forward championship results as soon as possible after completion of firing to ensure publication in this column. MURRAY BRIDGE Wintry weather prevailed on May 30, when the year's programme was wound up by a final shoot over 500 and 600 yards. T. V. Williams won the day's stage and topped the scores off the rifle. This member has been shooting brilliantly of late. Scores for the day:— T. V. Williams, 34, 31 (2)— 67; S. Deed, 33, 31 (scr.)— 64; R. H. Lake, 29, 32 (2)—63; C. L. Lehman, 33, 29 (1)— 63; A. T. Potter, 29, 29 (5)— 63; C. T. Parish, S3, 28 (2)—63; M. W. Parish, 31, 30 (scr.)— 61; H. R. Jobling, 28, 30 (3)— 61; G. Y. Watts, 30, 28 (3)— 61; J. Porteous, 29, 27 (4)— 60; J. L. Watts, 33, 26 (1)— 60; A. Patterson, 29, 26 (4)— 59; A. Pat terson, 29. 26 (4)— 59; W. Ridgway, 27, 27 (4)—58; L. J. Foreman, 22, 17 (11)— 50. Also fired— K. O'Brien, 23, 13 (— )— 36. Following are /the results of the year's competitions:— Championship — M. W. Parish, 618 points; C. L. Lehman, 617; S. Deed, 615; R. H. Lake, 607. MacKay Trophy— C. L. Lehmann, 513 points R. H. Lake, 512; J. L. Watts, 510; S. Deed, 509. Retailers' Association Trophy — R. H. Lake, 321 points; G. Y. Watts, C. L. Lehmann, and J. L. Watts, 317 points each; the count out places G. Watts second, L. Watts third, and Lehmann fourth. Long Range Trophy — G. Y. Watts, 128 points: T. Williams, .122; C. L. Lehmann, 119. Provis Trophy— T. V. Williams, S.Deed, and C. L. Lehmann each scored 196 (the shoot off placing them in this order), and A. Patterson, 195. Club. Trophy (decided on points)— T. V. Williams. 10 points: A. Patterson, 8; G. Y. and J. L. Watts with 7 points divide the third prize. S.A.R.A Spoon— T. V. Williams and J. L Watts scored 132 points each. The shoot off resulted in a win for Williams. The tie shots were:— Williams, 4, 3, 5, 4, 5—21. Watts— 4, 2, 4, 4, 4—18. The year will be wound up on Monday with the annual prize meeting. An attrac-tive programme has been arranged. Entry for the meeting is 2/6, and prize money £12, divided up in the usual manner. Nominations for the Hawker meeting will close at Gordon's Agency at 4 p.m., or at 10 pm with the secretary at Hawker on Wednesday next. Weights, June 17. Acceptances and entries for Novice and District Race, June 24. * * * Broken Hill Cup Carnival nomina-tions will close on Monday, June 15, at Gordon's Agency at 4 p.m., or at 5 p.m. with the secretaries at Broken Hill.


    Roo Cull.... next week
    The TRUTH is out there,
    the Aliens think its a great joke on us.
    We still believe in Santa, but eat the Easter Bunny

    And the Easter Bunny tastes SO GOOD !!
    That's why he is made of Chocolate.

  • #2
    Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 24 May 1928, page 10

    KANGAROO HUNT.


    ROSEDALE, Wednesday. - The first kangaroo hunt organised by the Willung Hunt Club under the supervision of Mr. Clift, an inspector of the Fisheries and Game department, to-day was not as successful as had been expected. Thirty guns at-tended, and 21 kangaroos, six wallabies, and a few
    foxes were shot.

    TROVE - https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/a...ngaroo%20hunt#


    Next week 1888 Roo Hunt NSW
    The TRUTH is out there,
    the Aliens think its a great joke on us.
    We still believe in Santa, but eat the Easter Bunny

    And the Easter Bunny tastes SO GOOD !!
    That's why he is made of Chocolate.

    Comment


    • #3
      Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW : 1881 - 1940), Saturday 7 July 1888, page 3

      Kangaroo Hunt.

      A correspondent writes :-A. very successful hunt took place at Willow Glen lest Saturday week. Wallaby and kangaroo to the number of 160 were killed. A gentleman from Braidwood was "ringer" with 36 to his name. About half the number mentioned were kangaroos, amongst them being some very " old men," who were stripped of their skins before they were cold. Hares are making their way here. We saw three, but did not shoot any. I am afraid they will soon become plentiful in the district.

      Trove - https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/a...angaroo%20hunt

      Next week 1956 GOONDIWNDI Roo hunt
      The TRUTH is out there,
      the Aliens think its a great joke on us.
      We still believe in Santa, but eat the Easter Bunny

      And the Easter Bunny tastes SO GOOD !!
      That's why he is made of Chocolate.

      Comment

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