My shooting coach suggested ....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My shooting coach suggested ....

    The following exercises for shooting. YMMV.
    1: standing with one foot directly in front of the other, Toes of the rear foot touching the heel of the front foot and maintain balance and then practice it eyes closed.
    Result is to improve balance
    2: grabbing a 1kg weight (the iron if you don't have one) and hold it up at aiming height and steady for as long as you can.
    Result is muscle memory and better arm strength
    3: holding a pencil out, side on against a piece of paper to see how much your arm moves about when you think it is still and to do the same with your eyes closed when you start to have it steady with the first option.
    Result is control and muscle memory in the aiming arm.

    Also more air pistol shooting as it teaches more about shot placement and aim without the recoil factor.

    Anyone else have any tips or training methods they wish to share?

  • #2
    Practice makes perfect.

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by Viper" post=17620
      Practice makes perfect.
      Sorry, bubble burst time, but only perfect practice makes perfect.

      Thanks,

      Oddball

    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      NO!!! only perfect practice makes perfect

    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      No, Perfect practice makes Perfect. If you practice the wrong thing you'll get better at doing it wrong.

  • #3
    My wife has regularly suggested that I pick the iron up.

    Paul

    Comment


    • #4
      The only thing that will help you is perfect practice. Getting your guns out at home and dry fire after dry fire if you cant hit the range for live fire training. Most professional shooters will do hundreds of dry fires to one live fire in practice. Dry fire allows you to fire round after round without costing you a cent and you can examine your technique without being distracted by the bang and recoil of a live round,

      Comment


      • #5
        Have not tried the pencil on the wall thing.
        Agree with air pistol, it's not "cool" to have or shoot one but I don't care. Love shooting all handguns, and air is one of them.

        Comment


        • Guest's Avatar
          Guest commented
          Editing a comment
          1. Dry Fire, no ammunition in the firearm, good for rifle or pistol.
          • Stick a scaled down or smaller version of the target you will be shooting at normally on a wall 3-5m away, you can also use a contrasting mark on the wall.
          • Take aim at the mark slowly by raising you arm then holding the sight picture.
          • Squeeze the trigger "Do Not Pull the Trigger" until the hammer falls.
          • Follow through by continuing to aim at the target and maintaining a steady sight picture on target for a second after the hammer falls.
          • Repeat

          2. Timing.
          • Use a timer in conjunction with breathing between shots to time you rate of fire so you utilise the entire time aloted for the course of fire.
          • Example if you have 20 sec to fire 6 shots time a quick deep breath exhaling and holding the sight picture then firing.

          3. Eat, Hydrate and Relax, It is important to level your glucose and stay hydrated so your body stays relaxed.
          • 60 min before or so before the match start eating small amounts of foods like a sandwich or a piece or two of fruit, also have a glucose lolly or two 15 or so min before the match and regularly consume small mouth fulls of water.
          • If you can go to the toilet, go, nothing like busting to go during the match.
          • 5 or so minutes before the match stand with your feet shoulder width apart and breath deeply moving/shaking your fingers/hands and moving your feet and legs to promote blood circulation to your outer extremities, this will oxygenate blood throughout your entire body helping to steady your nerves and stopping muscle twitch etc.
          • Run the course of fire through your head.

          4. During course of fire..
          • BREATH
          • FOCUS ON FORESIGHT
          • SQUEEZE TRIGGER
          • FOLLOW THROUGH


          Do all of the above when dry firing and practicing..
          Wear the same type/style of clothes when shooting.

          Cheers

      • #6
        Add this to your P90x routine, and you should be kicking ass very quickly. My personal favourite for practical shooting.



        PRACTICAL RIFLECRAFT
        By Scott Olmstead for American Hunter, Oct 01 2013. :



        The rifle in America dates back to our first settlers. Indeed the NRA National Firearms Museum displays a gun that came to our shores aboard the Mayflower. Throughout our history the rifle has shaped our course. It has helped us put food on the table, explore and settle a continent, and defend our homeland.

        But as hunters we are primarily interested in its practical use as a tool.
        Webster’s defines “practical” as: “of, exhibited in, or obtained through practice or action [practical knowledge]; usable; workable; useful and sensible.” To that end, a “practical” hunting rifle is compact, lightweight, powerful and accurate. It wears a short barrel so it comes to shoulder quickly and carries easily in thick cover. Proper weight contributes directly to the balance of the arm, its “feel” between the hands; in a standard caliber a hunting rifle weighs about 71/2 pounds; chambered for dangerous game it weighs about 9. It is chambered to fire a cartridge adequate to hunt all game one wishes to pursue with the arm. It has as much power as needed to dispatch game at your maximum effective range, or to deal with the charge of a dangerous animal. It is capable of delivering 1 MOA accuracy.

        You’ll carry your rifle all day, maybe all week. You and your rifle must sometimes traverse severe terrain and suffer through terrible weather. But in the end, you’ll shoot for only a few seconds—and neither of you can fail to function. So it’s important to understand what your rifle represents in your hands. You can appreciate that only if you master your craft.



        The Practical Shooter
        Not all hunters are shooters. Hunters’ average shots on game in the United States are taken at less than a hundred yards, according to surveys by game departments nationwide. What’s more, they often are taken with a rest—a tree, a rock or the cross-bar of a treestand. Shooters, on the other hand, have a firm grasp of the principles of marksmanship. They practice from the prone, sitting, kneeling and standing because they want to regularly test their abilities. They know it’s the human element—not the mechanical one—that is most likely to falter.


        Continued at http://www.americanhunter.org/articles/practical-riflecraft
        Do not pass GO. Do not collect $200.

        Comment


        • #7
          Originally posted by Uncle" post=17506
          The following exercises for shooting. YMMV.
          1: standing with one foot directly in front of the other, Toes of the rear foot touching the heel of the front foot and maintain balance and then practice it eyes closed.
          Result is to improve balance
          2: grabbing a 1kg weight (the iron if you don't have one) and hold it up at aiming height and steady for as long as you can.
          Result is muscle memory and better arm strength
          3: holding a pencil out, side on against a piece of paper to see how much your arm moves about when you think it is still and to do the same with your eyes closed when you start to have it steady with the first option.
          Result is control and muscle memory in the aiming arm.

          Also more air pistol shooting as it teaches more about shot placement and aim without the recoil factor.

          Anyone else have any tips or training methods they wish to share?
          Just holding a weight for as long as you can isn't very productive. Also you need to train both arms or you will end up with large muscles in the left of your back and a large right shoulder. If you do it enough your clothes won't fit properly and you may have back trouble later in life.

          Get a 1kg weight or your pistol is better because most of the weight is in front of your hand not in it. Then hold it up 10 times in each hand so a total of 20 lifts for 10 seconds per time. Then go to 20 then 30, 40, 50 and 1 minute per hand. When you can do the whole thing without to much of a struggle you are strong enough. I know girls that are all of 5'4" and 50kg that can do it but I bet you won't be able to straight up.

          I can't emphasise how important dry fire is.

          Comment


          • #8
            Not shooting specific but I coached my daughter as a goal keeper she was very successful and made a very high level, she said one of the things that helped improve her technique was watching herself on video, we did this initially to improve her kicking but then went onto all aspects of the keepers game. She knew what she had to do but didn't realise she wasn't doing it correctly until she watched the videos. So maybe get someone to film you shooting, at the start in the middle and at the end, compare videos with targets it wont take long to work out what body position etc works for you.

            Comment


            • #9
              That's a damm fine idea, there is usually a tripod floating around to mount a video camera. Could probably pick up a whole range of actions that are over in micro seconds that you normally wouldn't think about too.

              Comment


              • muffo
                muffo commented
                Editing a comment
                Originally posted by Robert" post=137629
                That's a damm fine idea, there is usually a tripod floating around to mount a video camera. Could probably pick up a whole range of actions that are over in micro seconds that you normally wouldn't think about too.
                It probably depends on what level you are at. It probably will help at a lower level. At a high level the camera won't pick up you mistakes.
                When my father was shooting for australia many moons ago they did some trials shooting against a wall with black and white graduations on it using a high speed camera.
                He shot a 5 shot group. 3 shots were centre 10 and 2 shots were wide 10. He called the 2 shots where they were but the camera couldn't pick up any more movement than normal
            Working...
            X