Lack of agility

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  • Lack of agility

    So, I tried a kind of agility run test in an indoors gym for the first time. I can sprint and do the beep test as shown on youtube with good, high, score, so I know I can run pretty fast.........and crashed headlong into a brick wall despite having a good two metres to slow. I hit it hard enough to draw blood.

    I've only ever trained on dirt/bitumen and outdoors in the last 8 years, and don't have access to a smooth floor in a country location. I don't know if its my footwear or me being a clumsy idiot (I suspect a combination of both) but training should improve the issue. Does anyone have suggestions for exercises that I could use but which can be done on a dirt track? Alternatively, is it feasible/polite to ask for access to an indoor basketball court without joining a club?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Burp" post=10912
    So, I tried a kind of agility run test in an indoors gym for the first time. I can sprint and do the beep test as shown on youtube with good, high, score, so I know I can run pretty fast.........and crashed headlong into a brick wall despite having a good two metres to slow. I hit it hard enough to draw blood.

    I've only ever trained on dirt/bitumen and outdoors in the last 8 years, and don't have access to a smooth floor in a country location. I don't know if its my footwear or me being a clumsy idiot (I suspect a combination of both) but training should improve the issue. Does anyone have suggestions for exercises that I could use but which can be done on a dirt track? Alternatively, is it feasible/polite to ask for access to an indoor basketball court without joining a club?
    Burp,
    Seek out the services of an Exercise Physiologist. They will help you by giving exercises to strengthen the muscles groups to help you achieve your purpose.

    Thanks,

    Oddball

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    • Guest's Avatar
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      You could also join a local sporting team.

      Playing some sort of physical sport will increase your fitness and agility, maybe soccer for example?

  • #3
    I grew up living on the side of a valley, learning to skip down a hill covered in pea gravel took some practice but after a little bit I became the human version of a mountain goat. I'm not a small bloke and I'm still pretty adjile, I find its all to do with being in synch with how far you can bend an appendage and being comfortable, good shoes non restrictive clothing etc.

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    • #4
      Originally posted by Burp" post=10912
      So, I tried a kind of agility run test in an indoors gym for the first time. I can sprint and do the beep test as shown on youtube with good, high, score, so I know I can run pretty fast.........and crashed headlong into a brick wall despite having a good two metres to slow. I hit it hard enough to draw blood.

      I've only ever trained on dirt/bitumen and outdoors in the last 8 years, and don't have access to a smooth floor in a country location. I don't know if its my footwear or me being a clumsy idiot (I suspect a combination of both) but training should improve the issue. Does anyone have suggestions for exercises that I could use but which can be done on a dirt track? Alternatively, is it feasible/polite to ask for access to an indoor basketball court without joining a club?
      Hey mate, gotta ask - if you are mainly running etc outdoors, why does it matter if you slid a bit on what sounds to be a slick surface? Are you trying to increase your agility specifically for hard indoor surfaces? If so why?

      I wouldn't recommend doing any form of agility training indoors on hard surfaces. There is a reason squash players have such a high rate of ankle and knee injuries!

      What you have described doesn't truly sound like agility issues to me at all. A good way to test agility as we used to do in soccer and football training was to complete the following tests every so often.

      https://www.google.com.au/search?q=agility+test&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZDZVUsOkNKWUiQfqiIGYBA&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1600&bih=900&dpr=1#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=aCrXltjc-RyffM%3A%3BJEb4qL9H3cq_YM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww .topendsports.com%252Ftesting%252Fimages%252Ft-test.gif%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.topendsports.com %252Ftesting%252Fagility.htm%3B340%3B314

      https://www.google.com.au/search?q=agility+test&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZDZVUsOkNKWUiQfqiIGYBA&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1600&bih=900&dpr=1#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=vXLU_oc_Ny_YnM%3A%3Bou8tn1pocy-nNM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.hardcorehockey.co.uk% 252Fbl_assets%252Fmedia%252Fimages%252Ffitness-factor%252FIllinois_Agility_Test.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%2 52F%252Fwww.hardcorehockey.co.uk%252Farticle%252Ff itness-factor%252Ffitness-tests%252Fillinois-agility-test%3B1257%3B1563

      https://www.google.com.au/search?q=agility+test&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZDZVUsOkNKWUiQfqiIGYBA&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1600&bih=900&dpr=1#facrc=0%3Bagility%20ladder&imgdii=_&imgrc=_

      Generally though, simply improving explosive power, reducing bodyfat, increasing muscle mass in the target areas and practicing the motor skill is enough to increase agility. It is a skill that should increase by simply practicing.

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        I don't have any reason to train for agility indoors....other than the fact that I need to pass an Illinois Agility Test that is held indoors

    • #5
      I'm confused, did you say you crashed into a wall during the beep test? If that's the case than you can most certainly argue that your accident may have been the result of simple muscle fatigue.

      There are many forms of agility and it really comes down to being sport specific. So my question is, what activity/sport do you want to improve on (basketball)?

      Personally I don't think you'll get faster results than doing Plyometric training (to give you an idea; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plyometrics). Although in giving this suggestion it would be advised that you do it under the guidance of a qualified PT that has a background in Plyo work. The reason for this is because if you fatigue nerve (which there are no warning signs for) it will literally take up to a month to heal. I find using a wobble board or boxing training (real, not boxercise crap) to help in coordination in a general sense.

      I guess what you need to look at is what exactly you are looking to achieve out of your training.

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        No, I did well in the beep test, which was held after the Illinois agility test; which was held up against a wall.

    • #6
      Burp it sounds to me like your issue is a little muscle fatigue combined with a lack of specific training/muscle adaption in your legs and body mechanics.

      If you slipped or lost traction in slowing down you can add footwear to the equation.

      As an old football player/sprinter slowing down in a short distance is one of the most taxing things you can expose your leg muscles to.

      Most sprinters take a while to coast down from a top speed run to avoid injury.

      If you've mostly trained on loose surfaces you will have very good balance however the feeling of having too much traction will be foreign to you.

      If performing an agility or beep test I try and accelerate hard and then give myself enough distance to coast/wind down to a stop. Having natural speed is a blessing you just need to know how to utilise it for these sort of tests.

      If you can't find a hard surface to train on look at using appropriate footwear to enhance traction on grass, spikes, cleats etc and practice slowing quickly from speed.

      There is a little body mechanics involved as you must lean back a little to shift your centre of gravity behind your foot strike to enable you to slow effectively.

      A video set up that you can view later will give you an indication if your technique is sound.

      I'd advise against training everyday in this fashion as it's very easy to fatigue/overtrain your leg muscles exposing yourself to an injury.

      The Boar Man's suggestion of Plyo's is a good one as it will not only enhance your explosive ability but will enable your leg muscles to adapt to the very rapid slowing forces.

      Don't overload on Plyo, practise perfect form and give yourself plenty of recovery time.

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      • Gwion
        Gwion commented
        Editing a comment
        Hey Burp.

        PM'd you some ideas.
        Dino is right, allow plenty of time between sessions for recovery, like 2-3 days.

        Cheers

    • #7
      How's the training coming along, Burp???
      List to tick off:
      - TICK!!! NEW SCOPE: Sightron S-tac 2.5-17.5 X 56mm
      - TICK !!Left handed 223rem, Zastava M85
      - wildcat build in progress: 223McShort
      - TICK!!! Rebarrel Howa to 7mm-08
      - TICK!!! case trimmer/turner
      - Comp dies for 7mm-08
      - Case annealer
      - Custom dies for wild cat

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        Something I did on the weekend was for the legs. (See my post about) The gong is way up a steep hill so I had to walk up it a few times to tie the gong on, back down, back up to look at the results, back down, its 212 metres, and STEEP!

        In the last few days Iv noticed more strength in the legs, like when getting up from a squatting position. It used to be a little bit of a struggle but Iv 'blasted' the legs with the uphill climb.

        Iv read where legs get 'overtrained' all the time from just walking and if you want to strengthen them, you have to blast them, really get them involved. One way is to push with rear leg on each stride and pull yourself along with the leg out front, rather than just one foot after the other .(It looks very silly) but gets the legs activated.

        Im looking forward to the hill next trip!

    • #8
      If its on a indoor basketball court or the like have a look at basket ball shoes... They stick like you know what to a wet blanket and are designed for agility on that style of surface...
      Gear to suit the terrain mate ....

      As you said it was like running it all in your socks on that surface the first time... But I dont think your the issue, like a car needs the right rubber to get traction on different surfaces, so do you IMO...

      Wish you luck with the test mate...

      "Run Forest run"... "Stop Forest"... :P

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