White marks on rabbit liver - OK?

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  • White marks on rabbit liver - OK?

    Hi all,

    Managed to snag a couple of bunnies around the house tonight, was good to get out with the rifle and torch after several weeks of not even shouldering a firearm (end of year work railroads everything).

    Anyway, gutted the cleanly shot one and saw these marks on the liver....

    Click image for larger version

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    .... which I've never seen/noticed on a bunny from around here before. Something to worry about? Calici is pretty much non-existent in northern Tas and in the past 3 years of hunting around these parts I've never come across Myxo either. Basically every rabbit I've shot here has been in more or less perfect health. Both shot tonight were pregnant does.

    Cheers, Ben.

  • #2
    Originally posted by headwerkn" post=39078
    Hi all,

    Managed to snag a couple of bunnies around the house tonight, was good to get out with the rifle and torch after several weeks of not even shouldering a firearm (end of year work railroads everything).

    Anyway, gutted the cleanly shot one and saw these marks on the liver....



    .... which I've never seen/noticed on a bunny from around here before. Something to worry about? Calici is pretty much non-existent in northern Tas and in the past 3 years of hunting around these parts I've never come across Myxo either. Basically every rabbit I've shot here has been in more or less perfect health. Both shot tonight were pregnant does.

    Cheers, Ben.
    Me think's it's Coccidiosis from the pic.
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #3
      Burps informative little write up might be able to shed some light on it mate?

      http://shootingaustralia.net/forum/hunting/506-identifying-rabbit-diseases-and-parasites#19933
      Whacking Varmints is my passion!

      Comment


      • #4
        A type of worm perhaps?

        Comment


        • #5
          if any thing looks bad throw it away its not worth the risk

          Comment


          • #6
            Access was denied to that link by varminator.
            Could be Liver Fluke, Fasciola hepatica.
            ragonfand has the right idea.
            As always, don't feed offal to dogs/cats without cooking. They can't remove the liver and cut it open to examine it

            Comment


            • fishphillott
              fishphillott commented
              Editing a comment
              Originally posted by okeefenokee" post=39133
              Access was denied to that link by varminator.
              Could be Liver Fluke, Fasciola hepatica.
              ragonfand has the right idea.
              As always, don't feed offal to dogs/cats without cooking. They can't remove the liver and cut it open to examine it
              Link works for me

          • #7
            Im no rabbit liver expert either, But I've shot and eating a few in my yrs, and it just looks like "Fatty liver " too me ( not sure of the Medical name) .
            But my dad (from Essex England) , his 3 brothers and there dad, lived on wild rabbits thought the war years.

            And I always remembered what dad said to me about inspecting and cutting up rabbits "Eyes and Glands" check them.
            I'd eat it lol
            Marlin 1894 .44rem mag
            Tikka T3 Super Varmint .260rem
            Savage Axis XP Camo .260rem
            Ruger American .22wmr
            BSA SuperSport XL .22
            Adler A110 Synthetic 20" 12ga
            Boito Miura U/O 12ga

            Comment


            • #8
              I saw that and thought fat. But usually it is a bit more veiney and more wide spread.
              When you have good feed and no pressure in the environment they do get fat.
              Was the carcass carrying fat across the back, neck and inside the abdomen?

              It is common with cage bred rabbits to have quantities of fat, as the feed is usually good quality and they have controlled movement.
              The best domestic bunnies are cage bred but free to move in an enclosure, lots of work to setup and requires space but well worth the effort, sort of free range bunny, but with all the benefits of controlled feed and harvest.

              I too would like to see the organ sectioned across and the 'fat line'.

              My understanding is that liver fluke is internal to the organ, as a parasite.
              When checking organs it is best to do external and internal (open it up) inspection - heart, lungs, liver and kidneys, also inspect the inside of the abdominal cavity, and gland area's (joints and neck)
              You do this with ANY suspect animal harvested.

              Most importantly is cook the flesh properly.

              My 2cents
              The TRUTH is out there,
              the Aliens think its a great joke on us.
              We still believe in Santa, but eat the Easter Bunny

              And the Easter Bunny tastes SO GOOD !!
              That's why he is made of Chocolate.

              Comment


              • #9
                I believe what you are looking at is either liver fluke or coccidiosis. Coccidiosis is a more rounded like nodule, so my first guess would be fluke.

                Coccidiosis:


                Fluke:


                If in doubt........................THROW IT OUT!

                Here's a brief outline on diseases which will affect the rabbit liver:

                The Rabbit Liver in Health and Disease
                Jennifer Graham, DVM, Dipl. ABVP
                Liver Diseases and Treatments

                Coccidiosis: Eimeria stiedae is a parasite that can affect the liver of rabbits. This is a common disease in rabbitries and young rabbits. Coccidia may cause depression, diarrhea, weight loss, distension of the belly, and death.1 Diagnosis can be made by fecal examination but fecal can be negative because oocyites are shed intermittently. In severe cases where severe liver damage has occurred (the parasite can create yellowish-white nodular abscess-like lesions in the liver - see figure 1), the rabbit may die despite therapy. This parasite can be treated with a variety of drugs including sulfa preparations such as sulfamethoxine or trimethoprim-sulfa combinations. Good hygiene and preventing fecal contamination of food and water bowls help control this disease.

                Liver fluke: Fasciola hepatica is a liver fluke that can affect rabbits that graze in pastures containing carrier snails (snails are an intermediate host for the parasite). Diagnosis may be made by a fecal examination. In some cases, the disease may not be detected until postmortem examination (examination of the tissues after death). Treatment is with a dewormer and removal of the rabbit from contaminated pastures.

                Microbial diseases: Bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida, Clostridium piliformis, colibacillosis, salmonellosis, listeriosis, tuberculosis, Taenia cystneros, and parasites such as toxoplasmosis may cause liver disease and death in rabbits.1 Diagnosis may be made with liver aspirates, biopsies, or cultures. Treatment with various antibiotics may or may not be effective, depending on severity of disease and individual response to therapy.

                Toxins: Aflatoxins are fungal substances that may be present on moldy food. Aflatoxins are very toxic to the liver and can cause sickness and death in affected rabbits. Diagnosis may be suspected with liver biopsy and aflatoxin levels of food can be measured. Treatment is mainly supportive and involves removal of affected food. If severe liver damage has occurred, the rabbit may die before a diagnosis can be made. Lead and other heavy metals may cause sickness and death in rabbits. Diagnosis of heavy metal toxicosis can be made with radiographs and checking blood metal levels.

                There are a variety of other toxins, either inhaled or contact, that can be damaging to the rabbit liver. Most notable is the fact that cedar and pine shavings are cytotoxic (toxic to cells) and may cause liver damage; additionally, these shavings used as bedding could be linked to a higher incidence of tumors.4, 5 Eucalyptus and vermiculite may also be toxic.6 These materials should be avoided as bedding in rabbits and rodents.

                Hepatic Lipidosis: Hepatic lipidosis, also known as fatty liver, describes the abnormal accumulation of fat within the liver cells. This is usually not a primary condition in rabbits, but is caused by periods of not eating. Some of the causes of hepatic lipidosis may be dental disease, fiber content in the diet that is too low, obese animals that become sick, difficult pregnancies, and others.1 Radiographs, bloodwork, and ultrasound can help diagnose this condition. Treatment is mainly supportive and includes nutritional support as quickly as possible. Prognosis may be poor depending on the severity of disease. Interestingly, tea polyphennols (found in green tea) have recently been shown to increase hepatic lipase activity and protect liver cells from fatty degeneration in rabbits.7

                Neoplasia: Many tumors may affect the liver of rabbits. Lymphoma, bile duct adenoma, and carcinoma are among the most common types of tumors described in the rabbit liver.1 Tumors in other parts of the body, such as uterine tumors, may spread to the liver. Liver tumors have a poor prognosis, as surgery is usually not an option. Radiographs, ultrasound, and liver biopsy are used to diagnose liver tumors. Blood tests are not good screening tests for liver tumors, as they may be normal until late in the disease. Chemotherapy has been used in rabbits and may help prolong the life of the rabbit if a liver tumor is detected.

                Comment


                • #10
                  LOL chemo treatment for a rabbit !!

                  little bugger better be made of solid gold is all I can say!
                  The TRUTH is out there,
                  the Aliens think its a great joke on us.
                  We still believe in Santa, but eat the Easter Bunny

                  And the Easter Bunny tastes SO GOOD !!
                  That's why he is made of Chocolate.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    We need an autopsy done on this bad boy - where's Quincy Jones when ya need him. :lol:
                    Whacking Varmints is my passion!

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Thanks for the responses guys. I'm thinking coccidiosis myself... rest of the bunny was in perfect health, clear eyes, clean fur, decent bit of fat, womb full of babies... everything but the hole right through its lungs/heart

                      Decided to boil it up for the dogs instead (the flesh, I don't feed them offal ever). I'm sure they're thankful.

                      Cheers, Ben.

                      Comment

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