All things Foxes

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  • All things Foxes

    The old forum had a great fox thread. Seeing though it still hasnt been done here to my knowledge I thought Id start it up again.

    I just love shooting the bloody things. They may not be like a trophy sambar deer (which is probably the marlin of the shooting world from what I can gather). But they can be a bit of a challenge all the same.

    They do a tremendous amount of damage, both to native fauna and livestock. They spread disease and apart from killing rabbits, really do no good in our environment at all. They are finicky, flighty and can be quite cunning (although like people can also be very stupid!) They dont tend to sit for long, esp in daylight. Meaning you often have to take the shot as soon as its presented. Spotlighting at night is without doubt the most effective. Spotlighting using callers is even better. But I find calling them during the day to be the most rewarding. I find 1 shot in the day is worth 3 or more at night under spotlight.

    Like many an old farmer has told me - "the best fox is a dead one!"

    I normally leave the smelly things where they are shot, unless they are close to well used areas (house, sheds etc). Never bothered collecting them or putting them on fences etc.

    Anyway Ill get it started. A mate asked me to his property last night to take care of some rabbits around his homestead/sheds. We went for a walk around at dusk, he was in his best camo gear (work fluoro safety jacket) and we were quietly stalking paying close attention to wind direction, well we were actually walking normally wherever talking away. Our strategy worked, knocked off over a dozen in about 30mins with my little 17hmr. Not real gun shy!

    Unfortuneatly the wind really started to pick up around 20 knots. We knew it was going to make life much tougher, but thought wed go out on dark anyway just to see if there were many foxes around. (Dont often get the chance for a shot on a school night!).

    Took my ute with HID powa beam and had a red filter on. The red filter was very good once used to it. We saw 3 or 4 foxes 300m to 400m off. My mate knew the distances pretty well as he knows the size of his paddocks, makes life much easier. We could ID them through scopes (I only saw the eyes without aid of a scope). They werent coming in to the whistle (only looking) and were on the move. Didnt want to waste a shot to educate them as I mainly wanted to see what was about to try and hit with a caller during the day.

    Finally saw one in range. I thought around 200m up hill (still safe shot as hill rose behind her). Quite a strong cross wind (right to left). I know my 250 with my fox load drops around 70mm at 200m. I aimed just above where the top of her neck where it joins the shoulder (her head was down a little) hoping the wind and drop would put the bullet in the control room. Bullet dropped and travelled a bit more in wind than I thought. But was an instant flop/kill anyway thanks to it being a hottish load/bigger cal. Ranged her at 205m so pretty happy all in all. Shot another 2 but went for heart shots as the wind was a bit gusty and didnt want to get it wrong. (Got 3 all up for those who struggle with maths! ) Saw a couple of others but not able to take a shot. Had an earlyish night as conditions werent great. I know where I will be going to call them during the day when I get the chance (prob not till mid Jan now!)

    BTW the Red Quoll sleeve/ammo holders are brilliant. Protect stock nicely and easy getting fresh ammo when in a rush.I have 2 and love them.


    22-250 vs fox last week. Saw many but were targeting pigs so only shot ones that were close by. Got 6 all up. Want to go back really targeting foxes, I think could get 15+ in a weekend in the right conditions.


    22-250, prob not worth using this cal if you like skins. I do find that any chest/neck/head shots flop them instantly for some reason


    Older photo of a fox vs 17hmr walking using rifle mounted light.

  • #2
    Good work Vromme

    Keep smashing those redcoats!!

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      My preferred method is to hunt them on an organised drive.

      Most Winters you'll find me out on the weekend chasing Basil with our small crew and a handful of dogs.
      You don't need many to be effective if you know the area.

      This is my young bloke's first - the grin took a while to wipe off.

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      With a good crew it's a quick way to clean up a lot of area.
      With a big crew you can begin to put a dint in the population.
      Here's this year's dent.

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  • #3
    Well done fella's - I'll post up some pics of some of the foxes I've nailed over the last year. I've been a bit slack this season so far but I will have to remedy that, the pups should be getting about now so might have to make a phone call and get out among em.
    Whacking Varmints is my passion!

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Just shot four pups two nights ago ... they are definitely out and about.

      Vrommev, wanted to ask...I've tried calling them during the day and the night, and get quite a few in the evenings and at night, but haven't had one respond in broad daylight. Are they just more wary during the day or are they in fact mostly asleep and not responding?

  • #4
    Some of the foxes I've shot and pics of some I haven't

    Ruger 223 Victims

















    Some I whistled in but didn't shoot (no gun - just on a BBQ)














    22.250 victims








    Whacking Varmints is my passion!

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    • #5
      shot countless foxes, but this one was the biggest i'd seen in a long while.
      photo doesn't do justice but it was bigger and heavier than the kelpies.
      Click image for larger version

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      chest shot with 130gr tnt with no exit wound.

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      • Varminator
        Varminator commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Send-it" post=34751
        shot countless foxes, but this one was the biggest i'd seen in a long while.
        photo doesn't do justice but it was bigger and heavier than the kelpies.

        chest shot with 130gr tnt with no exit wound.
        One tough fox there Send-it! Smacked by a 130gn TNT and still didn't exit, she must have opened up big time to stay inside, much damage on the entry wound?
        Attached Files

    • #6
      Unfortunately, I don't have any pictures of ones I've dropped. This one has been tormenting me for the past couple of weeks (Spotted him 9-10 times) but due to fact that he's found a nice little home i the middle of Sydney, I don't lie my chances of shooting him any time soon. this photo was taken from about 5 metres
      Attached Files

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      • #7
        nup,.....must of just gone kaboom all inside.

        he was very floppy. :lol:

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        • #8
          Sorry, mucked up the post ..... see below.

          Mods feel free to remove this post.

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          • #9
            Heres some pics from our effort last weekend, we went targeting foxes.

            My mate and I had two good nights out with our .204 Rugers. A Sako 85 Varmint and Tikka varmint. There are some young pups out at the moment. I shot three in about 30 seconds!! About 5 came racing into the whistle all at once, I managed to take 3 of em before they scarpered!!

            We got 13 in total between us plus umpteen rabbits and a pig!!

            Damage done mostly with Sierra 39gr SBK's.

            Sorry about the quality, we only had our phones to take pictures.
            The fox with its head split in two was shot with a 32gr v-max.
            The brace of three were actually all shot front on in the chest but their guts were still blown out!! I am impressed with the calibre!


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            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              love to hate the little bastards!!! I haven't tonked one for a month now and im having withdrawls

              here are a few i have smashed in the last year or two















































              and my personal favourite


          • #10
            :lol: :lol:
            gotta love the wheely bin.

            couple of nice ones there CC.
            BTW,....your beagle?

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            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              i'm afraid to ask, but what the best whistle for foxes? I have a button whistle but not that good at it, thinking of getting a Tenterfield type?

            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
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              I cut and pasted this off the Abbey Archery site, re the Warrumbungle Fox whistle, which appear to be the button whistle..It may be the ideas of Mike Murphy?

              The best time to whistle foxes is at about daybreak or just on sunset. Foxes will come to pretty much anything that resembles injured prey. It is best to start with a couple of long wails, like an injured rabbit to gain their attention and when you see the fox start to come in, you should up the tempo of the call to make it sound like the injured prey is getting a bit panicky, having seen the fox. At this point, it seems to make the fox relax and appear to be almost a bit cocky and causes them to run in a bit quicker if they think a nice, easy feed is in the offing. Make sure you are well hidden and the fox does not get wind of you otherwise they will not even respond to the whistle and be gone before your eyes.

            • WhelanLad
              WhelanLad commented
              Editing a comment
              tipped a couple over last night,.... Chook killers!!
              Stoked on my handloads being up to the task. 130gr Corelokts ! winning.

              Remington 700 SPS .270 and VXII Leupold x50



          • #11
            :lol:

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            • #12
              One of my den dogs just wont leave them alone even when theyre home

              A day not hunting is a day lost

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              • SNOOPY
                SNOOPY commented
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                a few taken with my sako 223 with 6.5x20x50 ziess and pred 9x light


              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
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                Originally posted by SNOOPY" post=35375
                One of my den dogs just wont leave them alone even when theyre home
                That's the kind of enthusiasm I like to see.
                A mate of mine had a terrier like your one that hated foxes with a passion.
                You could try and get them up of of her reach but the bugger would still try to climb up to get at them.
                She once took a running jump off me to reach a fox that I thought I was holding up away from her.

                I'd be interested if you breed her.

            • #13
              hope you didn't drive home with him like that. :lol:

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              • SNOOPY
                SNOOPY commented
                Editing a comment
                Originally posted by Send-it" post=35377
                hope you didn't drive home with him like that. :lol:
                She takes a bit of getting off them when she grabs hold of them Send-it, top little dog

            • #14
              mum showing son what its all about

              A day not hunting is a day lost

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              • Vromme
                Vromme commented
                Editing a comment
                Hi Snoopy,

                Good pics mate. Im thinking of getting another dog mainly to train up on foxes. Just curious to know if you take your dogs hunting often? Do they flush them out, bail them up, track them or do they mainly go in after the shot?

                Thinking of getting a JRT so can go down dens/logs etc. But I am also considering a couple of larger breeds (kelpie/fox terriers) which would be good but just may struggle in smaller spaces.

            • #15
              Chewtah,
              Tenterfields work well,……if you can blow them ok.
              I can't. I seem to get it all wrong.
              There can be a bit of an art to it sometimes.
              They're not normally that dear, so try one.
              Don't give up on the button whistles. Most of the
              Purchased ones are poorly made.
              well made button whistles are great.

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              • Guest's Avatar
                Guest commented
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                Originally posted by Send-it" post=35494
                Chewtah,
                Tenterfields work well,……if you can blow them ok.
                I can't. I seem to get it all wrong.
                Stick with it, there's a bit of a learning curve before you master them.
                We were out the other night and my mate had borrowed his brother's Tenterfield style whistle.
                It was a nicely made solid stainless job.
                He couldn't get a peep out of it.
                I said give it here and got quite a loud screech from it.
                We used that and an ordinary button.
                It was probably 20-30 minutes before they came in.
                The thing that got the foxes in the end was a bit of polystyrene that I was rubbing against some colourbond.
                You can get a readlly good range of sounds from it.

                I'll sell you a bit - $15 for a square, specially designed for fox calling
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