Red or amber filter for spotlighting foxes?

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  • Red or amber filter for spotlighting foxes?

    Does anyone have experience using red or amber filters when spotlighting foxes? Are foxes less disturbed by a filtered light?

    I'm heading out spotlighting next weekend and any tips or suggestions for nailing foxes under a light would be appreciated. Also if anyone could recommend a good spotlight to buy that would be awesome. Something with plenty of range to match the .243 I'll be shooting with would be good.

    Cheers,

    Velocity.

  • #2
    Sometimes yes and sometimes no. Fox's are very finicky at times and what works great this time doe not work well the next time. Generally you don't need filters for fox , How you use the light is more important than what colour it is 90% of the time.
    When they are in thick grass and hard to see you want a bright light well I need one anyway . I have seen a Red filter work ok on Rabbits on open ground . The mistake a lot of new shooters make is they keep the light continually on the fox while the shooter is getting set or waiting for a good shot , if this takes a while then sometimes it can hurt the fox's eyes and spook it .
    Kind off move the light away now and then but still keep tabs on where the fox is and when the shooter is set then play the light right on him. Fox's that have been shot at before under a light can be more difficult .
    You could try a filter and see what happens , you never know .

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      I prefer green filters, red seem to take too much power out of the beam. I think eye shine is about the same with both though.

      Heres a pic of my ebay torch with an empty Celestron filter fitted into the bezel, machined to be a interferrence fit, banged into place and a green filter which screws into the empty filter thing.I can screw it in and out replacing it with red or leave it out when the torch goes flat.

      Did it again, please delete.

    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
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      I prefer green filters, red seem to take too much power out of the beam. I think eye shine is about the same with both though.

      Heres a pic of my ebay torch with an empty Celestron filter fitted into the bezel, machined to be a interference fit, banged into place and a green filter which screws into the empty filter thing.I can screw it in and out replacing it with red or leave it out when the torch goes flat.
      Click image for larger version

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
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      Originally posted by Happy jack" post=9646
      Sometimes yes and sometimes no. Fox's are very finicky at times and what works great this time doe not work well the next time. Generally you don't need filters for fox , How you use the light is more important than what colour it is 90% of the time.
      When they are in thick grass and hard to see you want a bright light well I need one anyway . I have seen a Red filter work ok on Rabbits on open ground . The mistake a lot of new shooters make is they keep the light continually on the fox while the shooter is getting set or waiting for a good shot , if this takes a while then sometimes it can hurt the fox's eyes and spook it .
      Kind off move the light away now and then but still keep tabs on where the fox is and when the shooter is set then play the light right on him. Fox's that have been shot at before under a light can be more difficult .
      You could try a filter and see what happens , you never know .
      +1

  • #3
    Is it too early in the season for cubs yet? The last time I was out after foxes it was winter the only ones I saw were very flighty and had no interest in the whistle. But last summer I was amazed how stupid the young ones were, I missed one at point blank range with my 22 as it ran into the side of the ute!

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    • #4
      i also shoot with a 243 in an area where the foxes are constantly harassed, they are very flighty and if more than a year old will do the harold holt in seconds of the light hitting them regardless of filter or no.

      the Mrs. and i use a lightforce 240 blitz without a filter and just get used to being really quick to kill the ute and try to keep the light near but not quite on the fox till the shot is ready then light him up and send one his way. its the only way aside from chasing them down and gunning them down with a shotgun.
      savage MKII FSS .22 boyds laminate stock leupold VX1 3-9X40
      howa 1500 .243 varmint bedded in boyds thumbhole stock leupold VX3 4.5-14X40 DNZmount
      howa 1500 .223 varmint in the "franken stock" shortened barrel (19") pecar 8X56 DNZmount
      gammo shadow 1000 .177
      akkar churchill 30" O/U 12G extractors

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      • fishphillott
        fishphillott commented
        Editing a comment
        while I have no experience with foxes
        I have found with other critters the moon phase has a lot to do with their willingness to sit under the light on a bright moonlit night they are more skittish while a dark night they sit for longer
        different animals will react differently for a number of reasons hunting pressure will play a big part of it

    • #5
      I don't bother with filters myself, I just hold the light off them so they are just visible in the outer edge of the light. I have a mate who uses red celophane taped on his Power beam, works well.

      If they run off just keep the light on em and get the gun ready and when you are call out Oi a few times until they stop and look back, when they do - WHACK EM!
      Whacking Varmints is my passion!

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      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
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        I used to use red filters on the spotty with varied success. As others have mentioned, I personally believe the way in which the spotlight is used is a bigger factor for success. Learn to keep the light on their eyes as little as possible, and where you're ready to shoot, keep the eyes on the fringe of lit area only. Another tip with spotlighting foxes is wind/direction. I've found my most successful trips have been in slighty to moderately breezy nights, making sure your downwind from your target. Good luck!
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