hogue stock mods

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  • hogue stock mods

    hi all,
    thought I'd share some mods I've done to my Hogue overmould stock.
    they're quite easy, stuff all skills required, stuff all tools required.
    this should only cost you around 25 bucks.
    the aim of these basic mods are to make an already robust and handy stock, into a more stable and accurate platform, and to make
    them a bit more "bipod friendly".
    Of course, if you had the coin, and couldn't be bothered, you could always buy the Hogue overmould stocks that do actually have a "full length" alloy chassis.
    these are available from Queensland for about $310. in many different colours including camo's.

    1) remove the action from the stock. (don't loose the screws now.! )
    2) have a look down the barrel channel of the stock to see where the stock may have been contacting the barrel sides.
    with sand paper rub these surfaces, taking care not to sand a lager than needed area away, check to see that you are not sanding a lump into the
    sides and that the sides still look nice and straight.
    Yes these stocks can be sanded!
    3) the fore end of the stock (front) is commonly criticized for being "flexed" up to come into contact with the barrel when being used in conjunction with a
    bipod, or other front rests. this can be fixed by simply sanding some of this area away to maintain 2 or 3mm of gap in between the stock and
    the under side of the barrel
    I cheated and used a Dremel. it works well !!
    Click image for larger version

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    4) next step is stiffening the fore end of the stock.
    this is where you need the acrylic resin (with hardener agent), and some strips of fiber glass matting. Approximately the size of the barrel channel.
    you will need at least 2 pieces this size. (Bunning's is a good place to find it).
    firstly, thoroughly clean all dirt, dust, grime, grease, and any other unwanted stuff from the barrel channel, this is so the acrylic resin will adhere to
    the stock material better.
    put the stock horizontally in a vice or similar, to keep it upright and steady. probably best to be doing this in the shed anyway!!

    5) now....as per acrylic manufacturers instructions,......mix a large portion of resin, with some hardener, in a container.
    carefully pour your mixture into the barrel channel, up to about 2/3 to 3/4 the depth of the barrel channel, making sure that it flows evenly into each little
    cavity along the way, but not back up on top of the recoil lug area.
    6) once you've done this, lay 1 piece of the fiber glass sheet/matting into barrel channel, gently pressing it into the resin, letting the resin soak into it.
    note = let the fiber glass matting lay reasonably level, but do push it down into the individual cavities a bit.
    also, allow the matting to adhere to the upper sides slightly in the barrel channel. this is to make sure the resin doesn't de-laminate away from
    the sides.
    7) watch it for 5 minutes to make sure its not going to all run to one particular end and it stays level.
    now the good bit,...........go and have a beer or 2. as you need to leave this to set slightly for a few hours.
    9) beer is done? good. check you handy work. is the resin hard but still tacky?
    yep?,..........perfect. Add another layer of matting, letting the matting stay fairly level/flat, but also have it curving up the sides slightly, but not up to the top
    of the barrel channel sides.
    pour another fresh mix of resin over this. trowel it up the sides slightly, to adhere the resin, and the matting to the sides again.

    when done, it should look like this.
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    this will no doubt add some weight to the rifle,............but we can handle that.
    and if you really wanted to, you could probably paint it black perhaps. but I couldn't even see mine once it was back together.
    Click image for larger version

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    now go play with the wife and kids.
    if you aint got that, play with fido,
    Click image for larger version

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    still with us?
    good.
    that's the "flexi" fore-end sorted for now.
    don't stress on how it may look on the inside, as once the barrel and action are back on, you cant see it.

    another problem that these stocks (and most others for that matter), is that the inside diameter holes in the pillars are too bloody big, allowing the action securing bolts to move north south east west, unless they're done up crazy tight!!
    this is super easy to fix.
    using a lathe (or get these made elsewhere), make some aluminum sleeves to go in the pillars,
    as per photo below.
    Click image for larger version

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    look carefully at the pillars. See the thin sleeves inside the original alloy pillars?
    make them so they are a snuggish fit inside the pillars, and that there is minimal 'slop' for the bolts to still fit in.
    cut to length, and loc-tite in place.
    Click image for larger version

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    hopefully all has gone well for you.

    last but not least is purely for comfort.
    from some high density rubber, cut out a cheek piece of your desired shape and sand the edges, so the shape blends nicely into your stock.
    this was a prototype, and should I do another, it will be finished off neater.
    apply some industrial strength (3M ?) double sided tape to the inside surface of your cheek piece, and secure it to the stock to suit yourself.

    once all this is done, fit the stock to the action and sight it in
    you should now have a combination that won't flex much at the end, and should be a lot more stable within the action seating area.

    happy hunting.

  • #2
    mods feel free to 'stickie' this ^^^^^^ somewhere if you think its worthy.

    Comment


    • #3
      To be honest you want the action screws to be loose inside the through holes in the stock. Contact between the side of the screw and the stock is a bad thing, causing all sorts of weird harmonics in the barrelled action.

      To get the action to stay in one place, you bed it using a bedding agent of some sort.

      The re-inforce of the forend is very worthwhile with many of the cheap plastic stocks. A better way to do it is to glue in some carbon fibre tubes - talk to someone who is into archery, they will have busted arrow shafts they may well give you for free, or buy some from an RC model store. Aluminium tubing also works but is a bit heavier, but a lot cheaper if you have to buy it.

      Comment


      • Send-it
        Send-it commented
        Editing a comment
        [quote="adamjp" post=7225]
        To get the action to stay in one place, you bed it using a bedding agent of some sort.





        very true,..........if you can find a compound that will adhere nicely to the over moulded stocks that are worth bedding with.
        does anybody know of one?
        would be handy to know.
        i've tried a few different ones and they wouldn't stick to the hogue frame.

      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by adamjp" post=7225
        To be honest you want the action screws to be loose inside the through holes in the stock. Contact between the side of the screw and the stock is a bad thing, causing all sorts of weird harmonics in the barrelled action.

        The re-inforce of the forend is very worthwhile with many of the cheap plastic stocks. A better way to do it is to glue in some carbon fibre tubes - talk to someone who is into archery, they will have busted arrow shafts they may well give you for free, or buy some from an RC model store. Aluminium tubing also works but is a bit heavier, but a lot cheaper if you have to buy it.
        Concur with the first sentence.
        Also I like the last tip. I have a few damaged shafts that have a better use now.. Thanks!

    • #4
      Hi Send-it

      This guy goes a bit in depth about bedding hogue overmould stocks. It is a good read in general.

      http://www.ballisticstudies.com/Resources/Articles/Bedding+a+Rifle+With+MatchGrade+Bedding+Compound.h tml

      Dazza

      Comment


      • Gwion
        Gwion commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by zom813" post=7823
        Hi Send-it

        This guy goes a bit in depth about bedding hogue overmould stocks. It is a good read in general.

        http://www.ballisticstudies.com/Resources/Articles/Bedding+a+Rifle+With+MatchGrade+Bedding+Compound.h tml

        Dazza
        Ok, so...

        As promised here is what i have done to my Hogue stock. Not the prettiest of finishes, but it has worked and i'm relatively happy with it for my first real bedding job.

        I have been reading/watching vids from Nathan Foster for some time and had always planned to use his materials and follow his instructions (with a few minor modifications; wisely or not???).

        Photos below show how i masked and prep'ed the action for bedding. The tape on the parallel area is to prevent hang up, the flat base and rounded section provide the stabilising surfaces. The area i highlighted should have had some tape as well a s Plasticine as the bedding compound pushed the plasticine out and i had a moment of panic as i cleaned it up and re plugged it.
        Click image for larger version

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        The inside of the Hogue stock prior to prep work.
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        The next photos show how i prep'ed and keayed the stock. You can see i have removed most of the cross pieces that are supposed to stabilise the platic stock but obviously don't.

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        I highlighted the stud screw because i plugged it later with plasticine so that no epoxy would get in and seize it up.

        Click image for larger version

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        The highlighted area are where i went back after these pics were taken and took out more material for a more solid bedding on the right angled sections for extra strength.

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        The yellow high lights show the areas later plugged with plasticine. The green ones show where i have again gone in later to remove more material prior to bedding. The section at the rear of the trigger well i also used a 4mm spacer before plugging it with plasticine and then removed the spacer. This is suggested by Nathan to give the rear tang a little more bedding surface. Also behind the rear tang, i got right in and took a fair bit of material out to give a good strong bedding.

        Click image for larger version

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        These are the materials I used. Nathans stock stabiliser and bedding compound along with some carbon fiber tape. The carbon fiber adds a lot of stiffness to the fore-end and also reinforces the junction between fore-end and action bedding.

        The use of carbon fiber was my own idea, although reading Send-it's post and also Nathan's instructions little more carefully cemented the idea. Two meters of tape cost me about $10 + postage. The bedding kit and stock stabiliser kit cost about $25 each, so the whole job ended up costing me about $75 and i still have carbon fibre to form up a cheek piece or something.

        This is how i went about the job after stock prep and masking etc, (I was going to take photos along the way but once i started it was just go, go, go):

        1/ Mixed up the stock resin and poured a little into the base of the stock, spreading it to coat the entire internal surface with a ice cram stick.
        2/ shredded some carbon fiber and plugged remaining voids between the stock baffles; using more resin where needed to wet out the reinforcement.
        3/ add more resin
        4/ add a layer of carbon fiber and wet it out
        5/ repeat 3 & 4 then top coat with resin
        6/ mix up bedding compound as stock resin takes up a bit.
        7/ wet down some narrow strips of carbon fiber with bedding compound and paste them to the sides of the stock, over lap the CF on the fore-end and continue the strips all the way along the sides of the stock, past mag well to where the inletting for trigger assembly starts. Also shred a little CF and paste it right in back of the rear tang. You don't need much but it reinforces these thin, brittle areas.
        8/ pour in bedding compound
        9/ Drop in action and slowly press into place.
        10/ Panic when crap goes everywhere. Just joking. Stay calm and methodically clean up the job.

        For more detailed instructions, read the link previously posted and watch Nathans videos on his site or YouTube.

        Some of you will note that i have done all this at once and that it would result in a fill bedding from rear tang to the end of the fore-end. This flies in the face of conventional wisdom but i decided to try it after speaking/emailing with a traditional custom stock maker as he claims free floating is just the quick easy way to solve harmonic issues and that full barrel bedding (not pressure bedding) on center-fires produces far more accurate rifles, but more on that in the next post. I also did it all at once because Nathan points out that there can be a flex point where the two jobs meet it done seperately and i figured a chemical bond is always better to a mechanical bond when using resins.

        Continued below...

    • #5
      a very good article indeed.
      I'll have to remember that one shall I want to do another Hogue stock again.
      I guess it comes down to how much one wants to spend on a Hogue.

      Comment


      • #6
        I use acra glas gel for a bedding compound drill plenty of anchor holes in the bottom of the stock. I keep the bedding down from the top as the rubber is to soft and flexes .wipe the area to be bedded with metho to clean any oil or what ever away. you will use a fair bit of bedding compound because of the hollow stock but if the hollow is filled it would use less
        its been trial and error to get the bedding to stay in some plastic stocks but I have got it worked out know

        Comment


        • #7
          So how does it shoot after the bedding job mate - any good?
          Whacking Varmints is my passion!

          Comment


          • Gwion
            Gwion commented
            Editing a comment
            Originally posted by Varminator" post=30296
            So how does it shoot after the bedding job mate - any good?
            Me, V-nator???

            Well, other than the pic above (about o.5MOA @ 28in/lb) when i was screwing with the torque settings (pun intended): I have had some success with it.

            Last night, 220m head shot, 140m raking shot through neck/chest, 150m head shot, 100m complete miss . Other than that, clean head and chest shots all around 140-150m on last light. A few complete misses (my fault, forgot to shoot fouling shot after cleaning earlier in the day; generally takes 2 to get back on zero), but no wounded animals and all emphatic kills. All in all, i'm pretty happy although i am yet to really get into the target work to really suss out it's consistency (and mine, for that matter).

            It's just about time to have another look out back.

            Cheers

            edit: Just changed ammo brands due to cost and availability. Went to Fed Power Shock 55gr. Short story: the rifle hates the stuff or i've become the worst shot in the world over night!?! Man, i really need to start reloading and tune a load to my rifle because trying to source consistent ammo (consistently available, consistently priced and consistently accurate) at a reasonable price is just too hard around my way! Now the rifle is going to sit useless until i can get some ammo it likes again. I wouldn't shoot at anything with the performance i just had! [rant now over]

          • Gwion
            Gwion commented
            Editing a comment
            Originally posted by Varminator" post=30296
            So how does it shoot after the bedding job mate - any good?
            I've been busy for a while, so a big merry Christmas & happy New Year to you all. I hope and trust you all had a safe and enjoyable time over the indulgence season.

            In the interim i managed to sort out the issue with the Howa re: bolt release catch floating about and reeking havoc with accuracy. I have also set up my reloading gear and done my first load development for it. I can report the results were favourable and i am now very happy with the way it is shooting, thanks very much V-nator! (not that i can shoot as straight as it does all the time)

            I started off following the manual and after establishing an overall length for my rifle, worked up in 0.5gn increments and found that with a CCI primer, 50gr V-max & ADI BenchMark 2 powder, 25.5 gn produced this result:


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            I then loaded another ladder test at 0.2gn increments, starting at 25.4gn and working up to 26gn. 25.4 & 25.6 yeilded the following results:

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            Based on this, i decided that 25.4gr of ADI BM2 was quite good for my rifle with the other components i had to hand, so loaded 50 rounds at this load working on the theory that the 3 shots touching where indicative of the load and the 2 "flyers" where indicative of my shooting. The ladder test was shot at 100m or slightly more as my range was measured out with brickies string so not exactly accurate distance. I also used the fairly primitive test rest for the ladder testing. Using rudimentary sand bags on my bench, I then fired three rounds at bull and then adjusted sights. The next 4 rounds were fired one at each of 4 different bulls. As you can see in the pic below, the first shot (top right) was pretty good, the second (low right) also pretty good, the following two on the left targets not so good, but i'm sure that owes more to my rushed aiming and shooting than any issue with the riffle or load. At a rough calculation, the accuracy of the load and my shooting is somewhere under 0.7MOA.


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            So, to answer your question, V-nator, that is how she now shoots after bedding, balancing and some load development. What do you think?

            Cheers,

            Gwion

        • #8
          So I was sitting down repairing a tent pole on the big family tent, replacing one of the sections that had split (bear with me here). To replace the section, I bought one of these: 11mm Tent Pole Repair Kit.

          It comes with 4x 11mm fibreglass tent poles each 650mm long. I only needed one of the four in the packet, so now I have 3x reasonably stiff & light fibreglass poles left over. I was wondering if I could use them to reinforce the fore-end of a Hogue stock combined with some epoxy or something like this: MatchGrade Synthetic Stock Stabilizer Kit

          I've read about people using old arrow shafts, do you reckon this would work as extra stiffness if I cut a couple of poles to length & roughed them up to help them bond with the stabiliser? Is it even worth the effort?
          Pro Tip: Taking the gun off safe increases the velocity by 100%...

          Comment


          • Send-it
            Send-it commented
            Editing a comment
            Hulk,
            It's certainly worth trying.
            i can't see any disadvantage anyway.

          • Aushunter
            Aushunter commented
            Editing a comment
            Originally posted by Mini Hulk" post=268617
            So I was sitting down repairing a tent pole on the big family tent, replacing one of the sections that had split (bear with me here). To replace the section, I bought one of these: 11mm Tent Pole Repair Kit.

            It comes with 4x 11mm fibreglass tent poles each 650mm long. I only needed one of the four in the packet, so now I have 3x reasonably stiff & light fibreglass poles left over. I was wondering if I could use them to reinforce the fore-end of a Hogue stock combined with some epoxy or something like this: MatchGrade Synthetic Stock Stabilizer Kit

            I've read about people using old arrow shafts, do you reckon this would work as extra stiffness if I cut a couple of poles to length & roughed them up to help them bond with the stabiliser? Is it even worth the effort?
            I think its worth a shot mini, if it doesn't work then there are plenty of pretty cheap & betrer stock options out there for the hogue, something alloy bedded would be my preference.
            My cheap Rem 700sps is a bi t similar to the hogue I think where its able to be twisted in the hand is pulled to hard.

            I glass bedded the action which helped to free float the barrel but on occasions I noticed the forend touch the barrel through warping so I just sanded out the channel of the stock a bit to give more clearance.

            The rifle shoots great & not overly concerned if i have to bin the stock for something better.

        • #9
          Can't see why it won't work, I'd give it a go.

          Comment


          • #10
            The problem with plastic stocks is not only the forend which does stiffen up with various methods of bog or shafts.
            The other problem you cant fix is those stocks flex in the wrist and around the mag well and nothing will stop that.

            Best thing is stock in a better type wood stock or a good fire and bin the things.

            I fit a few rifles I have or have had in (2nd hand)Weeks target stocks and then shoot ---.
            The rifles can be made to look ok if your good at wood work but they will be heavy and that`s cool with me as I don`t carry any shooter around in the bush or up hills and down dale etc.

            Nothing beats a god old fashioned timber stock in my view but I may be wrong .
            [center]
            Don’t poke the snake, walk around it and come back later with a double-barrelled shotgun and blow its [email protected]#!ing head off!.

            Australia in future, the outcome is the same, a bloody dictatorship run on the whims of a very few ego-centric pathological elitists.

            Comment


            • #11
              if you need to get a bit of reassurance that your bog job will stick and not come loose then.
              After you have used a cleaning method.
              Drill small holes into the fore end at a bit of an angle facing outwards in each section of the frame work-- a couple of small screws in each compartment of the frame will do it.
              Do NOT drill right through and bugger it altogether.
              Once the screws are in place build the bog around each one -- it will become a solid piece with screwed anchors embedded in each section and never come out again no matter what happens.
              Ok for off hand shooting but off a front rest ???? depends on the caliber and the weight of the barrel I suppose.
              [center]
              Don’t poke the snake, walk around it and come back later with a double-barrelled shotgun and blow its [email protected]#!ing head off!.

              Australia in future, the outcome is the same, a bloody dictatorship run on the whims of a very few ego-centric pathological elitists.

              Comment


              • Aushunter
                Aushunter commented
                Editing a comment
                Originally posted by NoFerals" post=268634
                if you need to get a bit of reassurance that your bog job will stick and not come loose then.
                After you have used a cleaning method.
                Drill small holes into the fore end at a bit of an angle facing outwards in each section of the frame work-- a couple of small screws in each compartment of the frame will do it.
                Do NOT drill right through and bugger it altogether.
                Once the screws are in place build the bog around each one -- it will become a solid piece with screwed anchors embedded in each section and never come out again no matter what happens.
                Ok for off hand shooting but off a front rest ???? depends on the caliber and the weight of the barrel I suppose.
                All good points NF!

                Bonding agents need something to adhere to & usually synthetics are not a good medium.

                The more a surface is scuffed up or indentations made the better the result.

                Keeping the contact surface super clean is also a must.
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