Refubishing an old dunger....

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  • Refubishing an old dunger....

    Ok, thought I'd post up a few pics of my little project.
    Now I'm new to all things gunsmithing, so I thought I'd start small, and simple. I'm pretty handy with the tools, but given that we are talking about fire-arms here I'm a bit cautous abot fiddling with the bits that go bang. To date my handiwork has consisted only of installing scopes and such, and that hardly qualifies as "gunsmithing" On top of that, both of my rifles were purchased "new", so I want to keep them in good condition. (naturally) After a little more experience I might have a go at glass bedding, or some such, but I'm not confident enough for that just yet.
    Enter "The Dunger"


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    It's a $100 farm gun, bolt action 12 guage shotgun. and it is a piece of crap.
    The first thing I did was to strip and clean it. The amount of crud removed from the bolt was UNBELEEEEVABLE! I'm talking chunks of mud here.
    The stock was no better, all sorts of crap had worked it's way down below the action, and had become a sort of slime in the bottom of the inletting. The exterior was scuffed and dinged, but the wood was still in pretty good nick, no cracks or warping evident. So after a good scrub out came the sandpaper.


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    First the 40 grit to remove the old varnish, then 80, then 120, finally some 340 to really smooth it out.
    This exposed some nice grain in the timber, but it was too light to show up under several layers of varnish. Oh well, to bad so sad.
    Then Burp suggested a method of charring the wood to bring out the grain. Now I remember doing this in woodwork class at school. A careful application of a flame (we used a bunsen burner back then) lightly chars the grain, and really makes it stand out. If you go too hard and blaken the whole thing you just sand it again until the lighter parts start to show though again. I have a gas torch I use for soldering bits of copper pipe together So I thought I'd give it a go.


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    A bit hit and miss, but I think it turned out OK.
    Now the fun part of painting it can begin. This pic shows the job half done. I wanted to show the change in colour as the varnish was applied.


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    It is a clear (untinted) marine grade gloss. The first coat is thinned with 10% mineral turps to help it soak in and seal the wood. After drying I'll give it a light sand and apply a few more coats. I'm hoping it will not darken too much more, as I like the colour as it is I'll post up pics when it is all done.


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    The next step will be to re-blue the action and magazine. Anyone got any ideas about that?

    Col

  • #2
    get a buffing wheel and polishing paste set up your bench grinder and polish away if you are going to cold blue you will need a pair of rubber gloves wash down with metho and rub with cold blue follow directions on the bottle I have had better luck with the paste

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      The buffing wheel is a good idea... might have to get one from somewhere.
      What brand of cold blue are you talking of? where could I buy it and how much?
      The dunger owes me $150 right now (including PTA, sandpaper, varnish and paintbrush) so I'm trying to keep this "on the cheap"
      Col

  • #3
    Originally posted by Big_Col" post=22440

    The next step will be to re-blue the action and magazine. Anyone got any ideas about that?

    Col
    There's 3 ways to go about it.
    1. Hot bluing in caustic salt is what you'd typically get done by a gunsmith.
    A lot of set up and investment required if you were going to do it at home.
    Provides a durable finish that lasts well. Fast to do once the polishing is completed.

    2. Cold rust bluing.
    Typically found on fine English guns.
    Not done by gunsmiths as much these days as it's labour intensive and therefore costly.
    It is something that can be done at home without expensive setup. Rusting solution, fine wire brush and boiling tank.
    Will provide an excellent finish and since it's your project you can spend as long as you want doing it. Slow process that will take a while.
    Google slow rust bluing or lookup Midway on YouTube for an overview video.

    3. Cold bluing with a cold blue paste or liquid.
    Quick to apply once the polishing is done.
    Not very durable. Best suited to touch ups rather than a full barrel job.
    Cheap and easy for DIY -a good place to start.

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    • #4
      Nice little project mate, looking forward to seeing the finished article. Thanks for the post.
      If I knew I was gonna live this long I would've taken better care of myself

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      • #5
        hi g96 do a blue creame and so burchwood casey they sell for about $20

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        • #6
          Thanks for the tip on the blueing paste.
          A little research shows that Centreway have the Birchwood Casey kit for about $35, complete with de-greaser, swabs, steel wool etc. I might give that a go. The slow rust blueing method looks interesting, but besides the time and effort required, I have no idea how I could boil the barrel/action. The bloody thing is almost 3 feet long!
          The rust spots on the barrel are going to take some polishing out. I hit it with the steel wool this morning with some success, but to get a nice even finish is going to take a lot of elbow grease. The blueing on the barrel is not that bad, and has come up a treat after the steel wool, but those rust spots ruin the whole thing. You can tell the gun was laid on it's side for an extended period at some time, there is a streak of rust all the way up one side of the barrel.
          Oh well, third coat of varnish this morning, by tonight that should be dry and done. I'll put it back together tomorrow for some pics, (and to shoot it on the weekend) and think some more about the next step.
          Col

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            The trick with cold bluing paste is to keep everything clean.
            The second trick is to not follow the directions on the bottle.
            By this I mean, finishing the process.
            Most of them tell you to wash off the paste when finished - don't.
            Instead clean up the barrel using an oil soaked rag. You need to repeat the oiling the next day. Do it a few times.
            It'll work better but you can't forget to repeat the oiling or you'll get rust.

        • #7
          Allright! It's back together!
          Varnish has come up well after 3 coats. I might do some more next week, but for now it is a vast improvement over what it was.


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          Just put all the metal bits back on, so it's ready to make some noise. I'll look into getting a buffer wheel for the bench grinder come Monday... but that will be a whole different thread. For now.... enjoy!


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          Col

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          • scythe
            scythe commented
            Editing a comment
            Turned out pretty well for what it will be used for.
            Bolt action twelve gauge you say, what brand?
            Could be fun with some 1oz slugs.

        • #8
          Looks good for a hundred bucks mate.
          Looks like a Mossberg 500 to me.

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