Boiled Linseed Oil For Stock?

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  • Boiled Linseed Oil For Stock?

    Hey All,
    I've got an Annie stock that I'm doing a refurb on. Just wanted to make sure that boiled linseed oil is the go. I used a French furniture polish on the last one and it came up a treat but I'm looking for a more matte finish this time.
    Thoughts? Advice?
    Cheers

  • #2
    There are a few things that should not go near a stock.

    Boiled Linseed Oil
    Steel wool

    and,

    depending on how experienced you are with recoating stocks - Tru Oil.

    Try and lay your hands on some Hard Burnishing Oil from Organoil. It gives a really good finish to the stock that is very water repellent, actually toughens the wood fibres and stays fairly clean. It does this because it is a natural Tung oil with a small amount of natural modifiers (unlike the other 'Tung' oils you buy from the hardware store that are closer to varnish).

    Wet the stock down - drown it in oil.

    Let it dry for a week.

    Using oil and some 400 grit wet and dry, wet sand the stock leaving the mud generated by the process on the stock.
    All wet sanding should get hot with the friction between the paper and the wood. You want the heat as it polymerises the tung oil.

    Let it dry for a week.

    Using oil and some 600 grit wet and dry, wet sand the stock so that the mud is sanded off, but is left in the grain. Wipe across the grain to get the excess mud off. This fills the grain nicely.

    Let it dry for a week.

    Do a final wet sand with some 800 grit wet and dry.

    Let it dry for a week.

    Finish seal it with a stock wax or cabinetmakers wax.

    If you really want a flash finish, keep going up in wet and dry grades to 2000grit before applying wax. This really polishes the finish.

    Comment


    • fishphillott
      fishphillott commented
      Editing a comment
      There are a few things that should not go near a stock.

      Boiled Linseed Oil

      there are quite a few SMLE owners who will disagree with that comment adam

    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by adamjp" post=10404
      There are a few things that should not go near a stock.

      Boiled Linseed Oil
      Why? please satisfy my curiosity and quantify your comment. Is it simply because there are better products now or does it somehow degrade the wood?

      The Germans used linseed oil and the yanks also used linseed oil right up until wooden stocks left service.

  • #3
    Boiled Linseed Oil (BLO) is just that - boiled (well heated to boiling point) in the presence of oxygen to make it polymerise faster than raw linseed oil, some have other agents added to the mix to improve drying or filling, or both. If you coat a stock in raw linseed oil it will never truly dry and will consequently attract dirt and moisture from everywhere.

    Even Boiled Linseed Oil takes a very long time to dry (days) and here is the kicker - it isn't waterproof even when dry. It does not harden the wood fibres, nor does it prevent the ingress of any other liquids or fine matter that may come into contact with the wood. The weird thing is, that it seems to trap moisture IN. It is sad when you refurbish an older stock from a damp area and find that the wood is riddled with fungus that is living quite happy in the nice moist environment provided by the BLO finish on the outside.

    Tung oil does provide a hard external shell that comprises the outer few mm of the wood itself. It is a superior product to BLO so why wouldn't you use it in preference when starting out on a stock refurbishment project?

    Comment


    • Gwion
      Gwion commented
      Editing a comment
      There is an old recipe used for preserving timber:

      Raw linseed oil 5 parts
      Beeswax/parafin 1 part (or a little more)

      Combine in double boiler so as not to actually boil mixture. If you don't know what a double boiler is, ask your wife, mum, auntie (your girlfriend probably wont know if she's under 30).

      Once combined, mix roughly 50/50 with turpentine.

      Apply while hot or cold (sets to a waxy paste consistency). I apply hot on solid timber (heat will effect any glued parts especially if under tension; not an issue on gun stocks in general.

      Linseed (raw) preserves wood and highlights grain 'figure'
      Paraffin/beeswax provides superior water proofing to linseed alone
      Turps basically helps in the penetration process.

      If you want a hardening agent to create an "egg shell" finish, dissolve some shellac in linseed oil as it heats.

      0000 grade steel wool with buff a better finish than any "wet & dry" sanding. It will get into complex curves and crannies where paper wont and it will do less damage to delicate engraving such as checkering.

      Items treated this way have survived for centuries. It's easy to do and any idiot can do it (me, for instance). Easy to repair/clean up if slight mishaps occur such as runs or spills. Curing process is slow.

      Many modern finishes are a one time application and are very difficult to perform repairs on when (not if) damage occurs. They are often developed to "mimic" traditional finishes but with a faster curing time.

      I love timber work, my father was a master painter/decorator when they still knew how to do french pollishing and i worked for a violin maker when i first left school (no oiled finishes there as it would "deaden" the tone, just shellac as the hardness and penetration give a "bright, crisp tone".

      OK, so i'm not experienced with stocks, but i can't see the difference in preserving timber!??!

      Cheers,

      Gwion

  • #4
    Regarding the 'treatment' of military stocks, as a personal choice I would not do so...for one most of my guns having survivied 70+ years without it after release from either active service or military storage. Also, keeps the rifle in 'as issued' condition from whatever respective armoury it was released from. Know that preservationist mindset matters little to many people, which is entirely their prerogative.

    Naturally this need not apply to the civilian firearm.

    Comment


    • macca41
      macca41 commented
      Editing a comment
      Here's a stock for sale - there are 3 others as well: Cheers, Macca

      http://firearmsales.com.au/listings/view-listings-premium.php?listing_id=7069

    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Yeah I stopped in at Lawrance on my way home from the city the other day (make it a habit of bayonet-drooling lol) and they related the same thing to me, coyote. Unlikely to see any come through their shop again for an indefinite period, and possibly on a permanent basis . So it is even more important that we try and preserve them as they were last issued.

      No matter if there were "millions made" - your rifle will outlive you, and will it survive in 'historical' condition is the question.

    • sn@abrc
      [email protected] commented
      Editing a comment
      Gidday fellas- It certainly helps to know where to look!
      You have helped me heaps,
      I will fit a replacement stock- but very carefully repair the existing stock, [luckily I spotted the crack very early] and keep it packed away.

      Macca- thanks for the link to the stocks, I had never come across that site before- lots of good bits and one of those stocks will be on ts way west soon.

      Gwion- I will pick up some of each glue, and do a test on some scrap timber to see if they react with ballistol in any way- then try out your syringe idea.

      I too remember the times of "cheap" military rifles and bayonets- although they were not as cheap and plentiful over here in W.A. in comparison the the eastern states.

      My first threeohs came from Horsley Park, 2 for $180, ammo was Iraqi late 1970's manufactured mk7ball @$180/1000 rounds. delivery free!
      I expected the rifles to be junkers at that price- both turned out to be ex-cadet, but in very good nick.
      Ammo- wish I had bought a lot more while it was available at that price!

      stephen

  • #5
    Absolutely Brent. And the strict preservationist angle is for the civilian not to alter anything once it has left the military armoury.

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      You still need to maintain what has already been put in place

  • #6
    "Maintenance" done after the fact is counter to the whole preservationaist rationale. And I can't say that any stock I own shows even the slightest sign of 'cracking' or such which would suggest a dire need for such maintenance. Of course, it was often customary in said armouries for rifles to be stored away having been dunked in cosmoline - why some of them leak cosmo often for decades afterwards every firing. I don't know about SMLEs maybe they are different.



    Any work done on it after leaving the arsenals and storage facilities in the Ukraine is not part of its military history and not part of “preservation”. It is civilian work and is detrimental to its value and military history. Making a ex-military rifle into something it never was (changing its configuration or parts after sale to the importer) or changing it back to a configuration it used to be in but later changed by the Soviets (in the case of ex-snipers being re-snipered) is not preservation. It is altering and will be detrimental to its value. Most collectors are not interested in these altered rifles, and the owners usually have problems selling them later.

    The most used comments we hear is“I did this because I wanted a cheap sniper" or "the shellac is flaking off and it was of no value because ot that, so I refinished it", or some other rediculas reason and "I never intend to sell it ever anyway, it will be with me forever”. That is never the case and even if it is, the rifle will be passed down to someone when you die. The reason we have some of these collectables today is because someone before you did not destroy their value and preserved them and passed them on. The question will you do the same and pass a rifle down that will be intact and valuable in the future?
    http://russian-mosin-nagant-forum.co...ent/index.html



    Now I know you were only talking about "maintenance" and not anything particularly drastic. But it is still considered 'altering'.

    Comment


    • Gwion
      Gwion commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by zhuk" post=10755
      "Maintenance" done after the fact is counter to the whole preservationaist rationale. And I can't say that any stock I own shows even the slightest sign of 'cracking' or such which would suggest a dire need for such maintenance. Of course, it was often customary in said armouries for rifles to be stored away having been dunked in cosmoline - why some of them leak cosmo often for decades afterwards every firing. I don't know about SMLEs maybe they are different.

      Now I know you were only talking about "maintenance" and not anything particularly drastic. But it is still considered 'altering'.
      That's interesting, Zhuk. Just an honest question.

      Would the "collector's vallue" be lessened if the owner used the same products to oil metal/preserve wood as that used by military armouers (if they could get them)?
      Also, wouldn't firing them also devalue them for a collector as that is also post military???

      Just interested to know what the "miltary collector's" think about this.

      Cheers

  • #7
    No worries Brent, I get what you're saying. Its just whether you ascribe to the full-on purist viewpoint when it comes to preservation and leaving things as they were. Sure there were millions made, but its only a drop in the ocean timewise since WW2 and you have to think how few will be left untouched in that state in generations to come. Sadly, the russians and ukrainians have been busy completely destroying whole warehouses full of often pristine historical weapons, such as the of crates of untouched Tokarevs still in their wrappers gone into crushers....


    Also I think a lot of collectors/enthusiasts in the US are particularly sensitive if you see what Bubba'ized horrors have been perpetuated there especially Lol


    My own personal view is just that I would not touch anything, beyond the most minimal treatment needed for actual broken parts etc. But hey that's just me.

    Comment


    • #8
      I bought the Tung Oil, not cheap that stuff and Bunnings didn't have small tins although I did get a discount

      Comment


      • adamjp
        adamjp commented
        Editing a comment
        Before and after photos appreciated.

      • SPRINT-GTO
        SPRINT-GTO commented
        Editing a comment
        Tung Oil??? Is that what its called at Bunnings??
        How big was container & how much $$ ??

    • #9
      Linseed oil and many others contains protein and can support mildew growth.

      Maybe not a problem on a stock, but I would look into other options.

      Comment


      • #10
        I'd concede to Adam's advice here based completely on some woodwork from my old Win 92 that he refinished for me. It went from $150 clunker to something very impressive, he even found some nice grain in the 100 year old walnut. I've also seen some of his Ruger No 1's that he has restocked and finished with the process he outlines above and they are absolute showpieces, I'm still amazed that he takes them out hunting, I'd be scared of damaging them.
        Guns don't kill people, Chuck Norris does.

        Comment


        • adamjp
          adamjp commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks Greg.

          Hunting rifles are for hunting. Mind you, when I go to NZ after Chamois/Thar I won't be packing a nicely stocked No.1. A carbonfibre stocked Rem700 in 6.5 SAUM will get that job.

      • #11
        Hi Adam,
        got any pics of this Ruger No#1 and some of the other stocks you've given the Tung oil treatment to?
        Would certainly be keen to see some
        Repro L42a1 Project

        Comment


        • adamjp
          adamjp commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by BrianLara400*" post=14295
          Hi Adam,
          got any pics of this Ruger No#1 and some of the other stocks you've given the Tung oil treatment to?
          Would certainly be keen to see some
          Ruger No.1 in 6.5x47 Lapua - RSI pattern using English Walnut.

          This is pretty much my normal hunting rifle. The only times I don't carry it is when I know it's going to rain, or I'm heading up some steep hills.

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          The whole rifle.

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      • #12
        I did a refurb on my K98 stock, used raw linseed oil, and after all the coats and sanding in between I finished it with a 0000 wire wool. Came up a treat.

        Comment


        • #13
          Greg's Model 92 Stock

          Before

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          After

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          • #14
            A Model 1906 I did for a bloke at work. We wanted to refurb the stock, but retain the character of his grandfather's little rifle.

            Before
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            The whole rifle, Cerakoted in Burnt Bronze (which is nowhere near as golden looking without the flash)

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            He loves it, his daughters love it, and it will last for another 100 years. All I did with this stock was drown it in oil, mud it, and then sand back up to 800grit wet and dry. It took two weeks to blast it and Cerakote it, two months to do the wood.

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            • Guest's Avatar
              Guest commented
              Editing a comment
              Damn that wood's nice. Dunno about the gold though :lol:

          • #15
            Very nice work Adam, that No1 is magnificent.
            Think I'll go with the Tung oil on my next project.
            Repro L42a1 Project

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