Bedding stories, good and bad.

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  • Bedding stories, good and bad.

    I'd like to hear from people who have had their rifle pillar and/or glass bedded. Are you happy with the accuracy results? did it help the accuracy? general comments on before and after bedding/pillars also welcome. Cheers.

  • #2
    hi if you want to make a rifle more accurate then bed the action and float the barrel if it is a target rifle then pillar bed it

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Remo" post=14826
      I'd like to hear from people who have had their rifle pillar and/or glass bedded. Are you happy with the accuracy results? did it help the accuracy? general comments on before and after bedding/pillars also welcome. Cheers.
      I recently had both my CZ rifles (CZ527 in .223 & a CZ550 in 6.5x55 Swede) bedded and floated. Both now shoot groups half the size of what they were doing before the job was done. The before and after testing was done with factory loads and I'm expecting further improvement when I start handloading.

      Regards

      Peter

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      • Guest's Avatar
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        I've bedded a a couple of rimfires, a 7mm08 tikka recently and I quasi bedded a 357 marlin lever action

        in the timber stocked rimfires it really didnt make much difference in accuracy - although they were accurate to begin with. I have noticed that its been 3 or 4 years since I did them and I cant recall ever having to adjust the scope to adjust for a wandering POI though (so I guess the bedding has done something)

        in my experience it seems to make the biggest difference in centrefires (i suspect its directly related to the amount of recol the stock actually takes and/ or vibration)

        in the 357 lever I basically halved my groups - although I didnt bed it with epoxy. instead I relieved a lot of the contact points with the barrel and the magazine tube and 'bedded' them with high temperature vulcanising silicone. so the barrel for the most part is sitting in a bed of rubbery vibration dampening material. the barrel is also isolated as much as possible from any metal to metal contact. it completely changed the rifle from a 4-5moa gun to a 2-2.5moa gun.

        in the 7mm08 tikka - it was initially shooting very well in its factory stock but I overtorqued the stock and it sort of got crushed and never recovered even after I backed out the action screw tension and some groups improved, it would throw a cold bore flyer about 1mil high with absolute certainty! some loads - particularly the hotter ones, would also vertically string by about 1mil on other loads it would print a nice small group but throw some huge flyers or print two small separated groups. I got a new stock from manners and bedded it (twice - because I stuffed up the position of the recoil lug the first time ) - I also experimented with bedding the knox form for about 1.5inches (the parrallel bit of the barrel where it attaches to the receiver) as I read from a NZ based longrange hunting website that it sometimes dampens the barrel vibrations and makes the rifle less load picky.

        The short story is it also transformed the rifle! the cold bore flyer disappeared completely, the groups tightened up (I shot a range of loads into about 0.6moa and after changing my grip shot a couple in the mid 0.3's) the vertical stringing also disappeared and the rifle does seem less load picky now (although I've only fired 50 rounds through it since I've bedded it) - I havent gone to the trouble of testing my first (and most reliably accurate) loads on the gun though - that should give a reasonable indication of whether a properly bedded aftermarket stock can improve on the factory tikka plastic one

        on an unrelated note I recall that screwing on a muzzle brake also made it much easier to shoot tight groups (and almost seemed to cover up some minor bedding issues) - in any case the gun was more forgiving of poor shooting techniques but it was too bloody loud!

    • #4
      all my rifles are bedded and floated.
      this includes my rimfires, target rifles, hunting & varmint rifles.
      most of my bedding involves bedding the action into the surrounding stock inletting and recoil lug section better.
      except for my 6.5 swede. that's not bedded. she'll do nearly1 MOA all day which is more than good enough for pigs, goats, dingoes etc.
      I have found that bedding my rifles has made them a bit more consistent, irrespective of the different types of ammo used in each one, within reason.
      especially once the reloads were increased in powder charge. bedding helped the rifles tolerate the increase in shot intensity/vibration.
      this extra consistency helps to build confidence in your shooting equipment too.
      on average, bedding my rifles has increased this consistency by about 30 to 50%.
      there have been times when a rifle or two of mine would print a nice 1/2" group to the left, then a nice 1/2" group to the right.
      that's what bedding helps to eliminate. and once you have this consistency, then you can focus on other accuracy effecting factors.
      I have never bedded a rifle and had a negative result in regards to improving the accuracy.

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      • #5
        Interesting read guys. I though about getting my Howa .243 bedded. Its got the factory hogue stock. Any disadvantages in bedding it in this stock? Most of what I read it appears these have been done but usually with an aftermarket stock (Boyd's etc)

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        • El-Skippo
          Skip commented
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          I remember the first time Pody bedded his stock.

        • Varminator
          Varminator commented
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          Originally posted by elfman" post=61808
          Interesting read guys. I though about getting my Howa .243 bedded. Its got the factory hogue stock. Any disadvantages in bedding it in this stock? Most of what I read it appears these have been done but usually with an aftermarket stock (Boyd's etc)
          Have a look at this stuff.
          http://www.ballisticstudies.com/shop/MatchGrade+Bedding+Products/MatchGrade+Synthetic+Stock+Stabilizer+Kit.html

          This is how to use it
          http://www.ballisticstudies.com/Knowledgebase/MatchGrade+Synthetic+Stock+Stabilizer.html

          Vids on Bedding Rifles
          http://www.ballisticstudies.com/Knowledgebase/Bedding+a+Rifle+With+MatchGrade+Bedding+Compound.h tml

      • #6
        elfman,
        you may be interested in the "Hogue stock mods" thread, in this general gunsmithing area.

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          That makes sense!

          Thanks mate, I'll take a look

      • #7
        From what I've seen even accurate rifles seem to be a bit more consistent with bedding,
        & ordinary rifles improve to no end usually.

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          I think it cuts down on the "fliers" that you cant explain in your groups.
          If you want constancy & intend to shoot long distance I think its a must.
          I think on rimrfires its not required IMO but I did my first bedding job on a boyds stock on my .270 last year & yes it turned a 1 moa rifle into a 1/2 moa rifle!

      • #8
        rimfires still benefit from bedding, but more so on stocks that may not be fitting as good as they could be.
        my rimfires are bedded, and I did notice a 'slight' improvement in consistency.
        they went from shooting good, to shooting superbly.

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        • #9
          I bed all rifles I have ever had and most second hand ones will improve out of sight if the wood has shrunk over time .
          Recently improved [or was it just flukey] an Omark by leaving the barrel reinforce with slightly less than the case length bedded in front of the recoil lug.
          I took an inch or so out from the front of the bedding.
          Did an old 303 one time in all conceivable action to wood contact points behind the barrel reinforce even the but stock.
          It shoots like crazy but its a jumpy sod with a light barrel and wood cut down.
          It`s a great scrub gun but gets little use nowadays so little in fact I would sell it if transport from SA was not such a problem.
          How many remember the old 303`s used to have rubber nose fore end tip as well to cut down the whip and the barrel smoked all the way of its length to find any points touching under recoil ?.

          Bedding going wrong is simple ---pull it out and remove the old material with a dremmel or what ever and do it again till you get it right.
          I have success by pressing the action firmly in to the compound and setting it in place with very light tension and no stresses on the action at all.
          A couple of cable ties will hold it as long as there is a spacer around the barrel to fore end wood tip to center it and headless pilot action screws to position the action in the right place .... works fine for me.

          Probably one of the worst things to do is uneven tension and too much , bend the action and its curtains for accuracy if your still soft bedding has not set.
          Out with the spade bits and drill it all over and start again if that`s the case
          [center]
          Don’t poke the snake, walk around it and come back later with a double-barrelled shotgun and blow its [email protected]#!ing head off!.

          Australia in future, the outcome is the same, a bloody dictatorship run on the whims of a very few ego-centric pathological elitists.

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            Probably the biggest or most frequent "bad" story you may hear is not using the right amount or wrong release agent!
            Kiwi neutral boot polish worked perfectly for me!

            On a side note, as the title isn't specific on whats being bedded I do remember Skips scope rail bedding job gone wrong, especially when it came to replacing the rail!
            Where are you skip?

            Also there are a lot of good youtubes & material out there for self bedding jobs.
            After building up the knowledge & the courage for my first attempt(it was a big learning curve) yes I'm now confident I could do it so much better the second time around

        • #10
          I bed the scope mounts to the receiver never had a scope mount come loose if you want to take it off remove the screws and get a drift and tap it with a hammer piece of cake

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          • Guest's Avatar
            Guest commented
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            How do you bed the scopes mounts to the receiver? Sounds interesting.
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