Torque on Howa Action Screws

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  • Torque on Howa Action Screws

    Just wondering if some experienced Howa owners can give me an idea under what sort of torque rating their .223 Varmint shoots most accurately. I'm aware that each rifle will be slightly different but a few responses would give me a a starting point/range to try.
    Also, as i'm looking for a decent torque driver (CRAP, they're expensive!) and i want to make sure to get one with the right adjustment range.

    Thanks heaps, people.

    Gwion
    List to tick off:
    - TICK!!! NEW SCOPE: Sightron S-tac 2.5-17.5 X 56mm
    - TICK !!Left handed 223rem, Zastava M85
    - wildcat build in progress: 223McShort
    - TICK!!! Rebarrel Howa to 7mm-08
    - TICK!!! case trimmer/turner
    - Comp dies for 7mm-08
    - Case annealer
    - Custom dies for wild cat

  • #2
    Last week i put a plastic stock on my howa.

    started with 40 "lbs front and rear and it shot sub MOA with 5 shots so i left it there.

    i used a fat wrench

    YMMV

    Comment


    • Gwion
      Gwion commented
      Editing a comment
      thanks Sabb... I'll give it a go. Think i might have to get the FAT wrench too. I've been looking ofr something with a finer resolution but they are all SOOOOOOO expensive ($200 and up!)

      Cheers

    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by sabb0" post=9362
      Last week i put a plastic stock on my howa.

      started with 40 "lbs front and rear and it shot sub MOA with 5 shots so i left it there.

      i used a fat wrench

      YMMV
      That's a good ammount. they say 55 inch pounds is maximum but I would not go that far .
      I'm the same as you 40 inch pounds on the action screws or around that figure .

  • #3
    The FAT wrench is perfect. Its all you need for consistent tightening.

    My Howa has the action bedded professionally so my response is different... I also asked my gunsmith this question. His response was to simply ensure the front screw is firm and then the same with the rear, I do mine up with the FAT to 20 inch pounds. But like I say the action is snug and bedded into the stock.

    The stock does NOT have pillars. And I would suggest anything without pillars isnt torqued up tight at all as you will do is just squash wood or plastic.

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    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by VarmintPid" post=9699
      The FAT wrench is perfect. Its all you need for consistent tightening.

      My Howa has the action bedded professionally so my response is different... I also asked my gunsmith this question. His response was to simply ensure the front screw is firm and then the same with the rear, I do mine up with the FAT to 20 inch pounds. But like I say the action is snug and bedded into the stock.

      The stock does NOT have pillars. And I would suggest anything without pillars isnt torqued up tight at all as you will do is just squash wood or plastic.
      That's a good point . Mine has pillars and epoxy bedding so it's very strong but I don't go past 40 inch pounds anyway.
      If it works well at 20 inch pounds with your setup then that's the only criterior .
      I settled on 40 because that's about what I applied by hand normally so stayed with that .
      Not very scientific but it seems to shoot the same so I never experimented any further but it may be worth some experimenting .

  • #4
    with groups like these i leave them set at 20 inlb front and 15 inlb rear all my howa's (4 of them ) have boyds TH stocks set like this.

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    • #5
      I just do mine up by hand (I use the thumb and the two fingers next to it to hold the driver and just do it up with minimal pressure) on both action screws (mine are never done up super tight like some do as this tends to destroy accuracy I've found) I then shoot some groups see what happens and if need be I tighten em up ever so slightly depending on what happens, if the group opens up I back it off slightly, shoot again, see what happens and adjust from there.

      Been doing it that way for years and it seems to work. A torque wrench would be easier and more consistent I guess but I don't have one and so far this works for me and on top of that I'm not pulling the rifles apart all the time - one I set em up she's pretty much a set and forget situation.

      None of mine are bedded and all wear Boyds Stocks and all shoot well.

      Just a word about the Boyds Stocks, for what ever reason I find the barrel wants to touch down the LHS of them, so open up the barrel channel (I use a thick piece of dowel with sandpaper wrapped around it, give the barrel plenty of room to move and you will never have an issue, also remember to reseal the channel with some sort of clear coat to prevent moisture issues.
      Whacking Varmints is my passion!

      Comment


      • Gwion
        Gwion commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Varminator" post=10046
        I just do mine up by hand (I use the thumb and the two fingers next to it to hold the driver and just do it up with minimal pressure) on both action screws (mine are never done up super tight like some do as this tends to destroy accuracy I've found) I then shoot some groups see what happens and if need be I tighten em up ever so slightly depending on what happens, if the group opens up I back it off slightly, shoot again, see what happens and adjust from there.
        Thanks again guys. As little as 15-20lbf-in??? Well, I'll start there and work up to the 40 odd mark, i guess.
        Varminator, i've been doing the same with my .22 but find i go through too much ammo doing the "tweak-shoot" method; hence the torque driver so i can get it right once and note the settings. As the best conditions for vermin (yes, that is English for varmint! ) at my place is often misty/drizzle (the wabblies seem to love that weather), i often have to pull the rifle down for a toweling off/light oil so i'd like repeatable, consistent settings.

        By the way, the rifle is in the original Hogues stock. It has pillars but is all flexi. I am going to bed & stiffen the stock later this week when the materials arrive. I assume this is pretty standard and working to all the above info will work just fine???

    • #6
      Mine is in an alloy pillar bedded stock and I've had very good results at higher torque settings. 55in/lbs seems to work for me, do up the front action screw first and then the rear one, this should help with barrel alignment a bit as well. you do have to be careful with non bedded stocks like the plastic and timber ones, if you where to put 55 on one of them it would probably crush the buunter out of em, but with alloy pillar bedding I've heard of a few actions torqued as much as 70 in/lb, my fat wrench doesn't even go that high :lol:
      Roses are red, mud is brown, Windows up, loud pedal down!

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      • #7
        Initial tests have put mine at about 28-30 in/lbs front and rear.

        Once i am reloading (cheaper ammo) i will do some more testing because i am getting 3 out of 5 into a 1/2" at 100m but two are some what wayward and the "off shots" are somewhat consistent in pattern as well.
        List to tick off:
        - TICK!!! NEW SCOPE: Sightron S-tac 2.5-17.5 X 56mm
        - TICK !!Left handed 223rem, Zastava M85
        - wildcat build in progress: 223McShort
        - TICK!!! Rebarrel Howa to 7mm-08
        - TICK!!! case trimmer/turner
        - Comp dies for 7mm-08
        - Case annealer
        - Custom dies for wild cat

        Comment


        • several
          several commented
          Editing a comment
          If your looking for a Fat Wrench there is a seller in eBay called Scopestop, a US seller selling them for $50 plus $16 postage. I got one and it's the real deal, comes in a hard case with a selection of bits.
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