NZ vs Aust Laws - Could someone provide a summary?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • NZ vs Aust Laws - Could someone provide a summary?

    It is often noted that despite not introducing gun laws similar to Australia post 1996 that NZ has similar gun crime etc stats.

    I'm aware of the big difference - semi-auto centerfire rifles.

    I'd be interested to see a comparison of other significant firearm laws vs aust. ie Licensing requirements, safety course requirements, safe storage, reasons for having a license etc.

    No doubt there is a forum member with that knowledge so thought I'd throw out a line and see if I could hook them for a comment.

  • #2
    Its different state to state in Victoria at least it is as below

    Cat A&B (Pump, Lever, Break & Bolt Action Rifles, Lever, Break and Bolt Action Shotguns)
    Genuine Reasons include but are not limited to Target Shooting, Hunting, Primary Producer, Professional Pest Controller, Security Guard
    Cat C (Semi-Auto Rimfire Rifle not exceeding 10 rounds magazine capacity, Pump and Semi-Auto Shotgun not exceeding 5 round capacity magazine)
    Primary Producer, Professional Pest Controller, Security Guard (Shotgun) and Sporting Clays (Shotgun), but only with medical certificate)
    Cat D (All not included above, excluding Machine Guns, and firearms with a more diameter larger than 50 Calibre)
    Professional Pest Controller
    Cat E (Anything not stated above & Machine Handguns)
    Prescribed Purposes Only
    Cat H (Handguns with a calibre less than 45 Calibre, Semi-Auto barrels longer than 125mm, Revolver and single shot 100mm)
    Target Shooting, Security Guard
    Cat P (IIRC) - Paintball Makers
    Anyone

    Safety course must be sat for first longarms licence, additional categories (AFAIK) do not require them, Safety course must be sat for handguns

    Safe Storage, Cat A & B
    • Hard wood or steel container – not easy to penetrate
    • If the container weighs less than 150kg when empty, it must be securely fixed to the floor or wall frame.
    • When a firearm is in the container, the container MUST be locked with a lock of sturdy construction.
    • The premises must have ‘intruder alarm system’ if more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises. - Intruder alarm system’ means an alarm system which is installed, maintained and operated in accordance with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time) and which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
    • Ammunition must be stored in a separate locked container (not with the firearm) unless the receptacle is purpose built to store ammunition separately from the firearms.


    Cat C & D Storage
    • Steel safe – not easy to penetrate.
    • If the safe weighs less than 150kg when empty, it must be bolted to the structure of the premises.
    • When a firearm is in the safe, the safe MUST be locked.
    • The key to the safe must be carried by the licence holder or kept securely in a separate room from the safe.
    • The premises must have an ‘intruder alarm system’ if more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises. - Intruder alarm system’ means an alarm system which is installed, maintained and operated in accordance with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time) and which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
    • Ammunition must be stored in a separate locked container (not with the firearm) unless the receptacle is purpose built to store ammunition separately from the firearms.


    Category E Storage
    Set By Commissioner on a Case by Case

    Category H Storage
    • In a steel safe:
    • that is not easy to penetrate;
    • which, if it weighs less than 150kgs when empty, is bolted to the structure of the premises;
    • that is locked when firearms are inside it.
    • On premises which have an ‘intruder alarm system’ if more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises.
    • The key to the safe must be carried by the licence holder or kept securely in a separate room from the safe. - Intruder alarm system’ means an alarm system which is installed, maintained and operated in accordance with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time) and which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
    • Cartridge ammunition must be stored in a separate locked container (not with the firearm) unless the receptacle is purpose built to store ammunition separately from the firearms. In this case the ammunition section must have an entirely separate key.

    Comment


    • Kong2379
      Kong2379 commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by ShadowPeo" post=8254
      Its different state to state in Victoria at least it is as below

      Cat A&B (Pump, Lever, Break & Bolt Action Rifles, Lever, Break and Bolt Action Shotguns)
      Genuine Reasons include but are not limited to Target Shooting, Hunting, Primary Producer, Professional Pest Controller, Security Guard
      Cat C (Semi-Auto Rimfire Rifle not exceeding 10 rounds magazine capacity, Pump and Semi-Auto Shotgun not exceeding 5 round capacity magazine)
      Primary Producer, Professional Pest Controller, Security Guard (Shotgun) and Sporting Clays (Shotgun), but only with medical certificate)
      Cat D (All not included above, excluding Machine Guns, and firearms with a more diameter larger than 50 Calibre)
      Professional Pest Controller
      Cat E (Anything not stated above & Machine Handguns)
      Prescribed Purposes Only
      Cat H (Handguns with a calibre less than 45 Calibre, Semi-Auto barrels longer than 125mm, Revolver and single shot 100mm)
      Target Shooting, Security Guard
      Cat P (IIRC) - Paintball Makers
      Anyone

      Safety course must be sat for first longarms licence, additional categories (AFAIK) do not require them, Safety course must be sat for handguns

      Safe Storage, Cat A & B
      • Hard wood or steel container – not easy to penetrate
      • If the container weighs less than 150kg when empty, it must be securely fixed to the floor or wall frame.
      • When a firearm is in the container, the container MUST be locked with a lock of sturdy construction.
      • The premises must have ‘intruder alarm system’ if more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises. - Intruder alarm system’ means an alarm system which is installed, maintained and operated in accordance with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time) and which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
      • Ammunition must be stored in a separate locked container (not with the firearm) unless the receptacle is purpose built to store ammunition separately from the firearms.


      Cat C & D Storage
      • Steel safe – not easy to penetrate.
      • If the safe weighs less than 150kg when empty, it must be bolted to the structure of the premises.
      • When a firearm is in the safe, the safe MUST be locked.
      • The key to the safe must be carried by the licence holder or kept securely in a separate room from the safe.
      • The premises must have an ‘intruder alarm system’ if more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises. - Intruder alarm system’ means an alarm system which is installed, maintained and operated in accordance with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time) and which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
      • Ammunition must be stored in a separate locked container (not with the firearm) unless the receptacle is purpose built to store ammunition separately from the firearms.


      Category E Storage
      Set By Commissioner on a Case by Case

      Category H Storage
      • In a steel safe:
      • that is not easy to penetrate;
      • which, if it weighs less than 150kgs when empty, is bolted to the structure of the premises;
      • that is locked when firearms are inside it.
      • The key to the safe must be carried by the licence holder or kept securely in a separate room from the safe. - Intruder alarm system’ means an alarm system which is installed, maintained and operated in accordance with Australian Standard 2201.1:2007 (as amended from time to time) and which, in the event of an intrusion, activates an audible alarm warning device and an external visible alarm warning light.
      • Cartridge ammunition must be stored in a separate locked container (not with the firearm) unless the receptacle is purpose built to store ammunition separately from the firearms. In this case the ammunition section must have an entirely separate key.
      " [li]On premises which have an ‘intruder alarm system’ if more than 15 firearms are stored on the premises.[/li]"
      I was adviced by the local Police on the above, To words of the same effect but when I called NSW FAR they said that it is not correct you may store as many as your safe or safes are able to store, and that there is no requirement for alarm systems, And that there is no limit placed on pistols but as most of us are aware once you get over 15 or so thery require a letter stating genuine reason why you require another pistol/s.
      I had this put in a letter and sent out to me to keep in my safe.

  • #3
    Sound suppressors are legal and commonly used in NZ

    Comment


    • #4
      Yes its wikipedia but a concise way of comparing


      Aust

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_pol...n_firearm_laws


      NZ

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_pol...nt_firearm_law

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Big difference between Oz and NZ: 18 million people. It's like this, over the Dutch ( ) if somone had a mind to introduce some silly law, someone else in the famous kiwi ' one degree of separation' would pull them back into line with a good talking too. And outdoorsy folks they are, someone in that circle will be a shooter.

        Australia, you've got multiple degrees of separation with non aligning circles, so anyone can come up with a half baked idea and be totally ignorant to it

    • #5
      I personally will take the NZ system any day, I personally can never see me needing more than 12 handguns but that as far as i can see is really the only downfall to their system. But thats also the perspective of a guy who has been single for 11 years

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Trapper" post=9380
        I personally will take the NZ system any day...
        Agreed! I would much rather go through more vetting & background checks and cooling-off periods upon initial licencing and then be allowed to own semi-auto centrefires once it was established that I was sane and of good character (ie: the Kiwi system regarding high-capacity semi-auto military longarms), rather than the system here in OZ where you can become licenced relatively easily after filling out a little paperwork and "cooling off" for a month or so but then are not trusted with even a semi-auto .22 rimfire or pump shottie (unless you're a farmer or a revered "professional pest exterminator", that is) as you are considered to be a potential mass-murderer who is not to be trusted with anything more than a "slow-cycling and thus not evil baby-killing" bolt/lever gun.

        My personal attitude to all of this is: background check the s*%t out of me as I have nothing to hide. Slip on the rubber glove and I'll gladly bend over for a thorough examination, I'll get you your precious little personal references to confirm that I won't be likely to suddenly snap and take up residence in a bell-tower somewhere with a sniper rifle. However then (assuming I have passed all the "fit & proper person" tests) just leave me the F#*% alone to get on with it and stop pretending that while I'm regarded in the eyes of the law as a responsible and law-abiding firearm owner as long as I stick to bolt-action field rifles I will suddenly morph into a foaming-at-the -mouth & mass-murdering loony if I were allowed access to semi-auto longarms or something "black and evil looking".

    • #6
      A tale of two worlds, indeed LW.


      For ingrained historical reasons, I don't think we will ever get to stage of being the beneficiaries of such a seemingly commonsense Governmental midset.

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Granted, most of my understanding of NZ laws has come from kiwitedferny videos on YouTube, but yes, the general vibe is that hunting is a perfectly reasonable activity for someone to undertake, and the rules are set simply to ensure those who are licenced are responsible and safe. The police believe it so, and so do a good majority of politicians too, so it appears. For how long though seems to be a concern for ol' Ted, but I suppose when you've got hundreds of thousands of dollars (if not more) invested you'd have reason to be wary.... especially as the NZ attitude was for the most part prevalent in Australia for decades until 1996. Things can change quickly.

        Cheers, Ben.
    Working...
    X