QLD: transporting firearms to range

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • QLD: transporting firearms to range

    Hi,

    Quick question about transporting firearms to/from the range (namely handguns).

    The Weapons Act states that they must be stored in a locked boot or locked container.

    If in a locked boot, do they also need to be stored in a locked container or will a pistol pouch suffice?

  • #2
    The way I understand it is they still need to be in a locked box.

    Cheers Antz

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      I would assume that being locked in a box with no identifiable markings would be sufficient (as it is for longarms) BUT the best place to address this would be a simple call to QLD weapons licencing branch. They are generally helpfull with enquiry's and you could ask for the correct information to be sent to yourself via an e-mail so if there is any dispute with individual police officers down the track you then have a point of reference to help cover your arse!

  • #3
    In any case, it might be worth buying a $20 tool box from Bunnings and putting a padlock on it. Cheap and effective solution for safe transportation.

    Comment


    • #4
      A secure container out of sight is also acceptable. That means the zipper is closed, and throw a blanket over the bag.

      Don't over complicate things.

      Thanks,

      Oddball

      Comment


      • #5
        I have written to WLB asking for clarification on this point, that was 6 weeks ago! But I was also asking about transporting ammo as well. When I get the reply I'll post it, but for now this may be helpful. If anyone sees an error, please advise, but in summary.

        Sedan - Firearm in the boot (it must go in the boot if you have a boot)
        UTE - locked metal box that is secured to the bed
        Wagon/SUV - in a zipped up bag hidden from view.

        In all cases, if you remove the bolt or fit a trigger lock or fit an action lock, all you need to do is remember to lock your car if you need to leave it for any reason, and you are covered. An "unattended" vehicle is no longer transporting, it is storing, but the only additional requirements are bolt removal/lock and lock the car
        .

        61 Safety precautions for weapons in or on vehicles
        (1) A person in control of a weapon (whether or not the person
        has custody of it) must ensure the weapon is not placed in or
        on a vehicle unless—
        (a) if the vehicle has a lockable boot—the weapon is locked
        in the boot; or
        (b) otherwise—
        (i) the weapon is locked in a metal container fixed to
        the vehicle; or
        (ii) the weapon is in a securely closed container that is
        out of sight in a vehicle.
        So, if you have a boot the firearm must go in the boot, if not a metal box secured to the vehicle (UTE tray) or a zipped up bag, out of sight in the passenger compartment.
        Maximum penalty—10 penalty units.
        (2) The metal container, and anything on or attached to it, must
        not suggest a weapon is inside.
        Editor’s note—
        See section 62 (Restrictions on dispatching weapons—Act, s 66) for
        examples of things that suggest a weapon is inside.
        (3) A person in control of a weapon (whether or not the person
        has custody of it) must ensure the weapon is not left in an
        unlocked vehicle if the vehicle is not being attended by
        someone licensed to possess the weapon.
        The words "attended by" are a bit grey, does that mean; sitting in, standing near or keeping an eye on? If that hasn't been to court yet, the first time it goes it needs to be with the best barrister possible because it will effect us all for ever!
        Maximum penalty—10 penalty units.
        (4) This section does not apply to a weapon to which section 60A
        applies.
        (4) is important because it means when you stop "attending" your vehicle you stop transporting and start storing

        60A Storage of weapon not in licensee’s physical
        possession—when away from secure storage facilities
        (1) This section applies to a weapon in the possession of a person
        who is—
        (a) the holder of a visitor’s licence; or
        (b) a visitor to Queensland to whom section 32(1) of the
        Act applies; or
        (c) to another person if—
        (i) the person is away from the person’s secure storage
        facilities; and
        (ii) it is unreasonable for the person to have to go to
        those facilities to store the weapon.
        So, when you are on the way to a legitimate activity and you need to stop, as soon as you stop "attending" your vehicle, this section applies.
        (2) A person who possesses a weapon to which this section
        applies must, when the weapon is not in the person’s physical
        possession, store it unloaded in—
        (a) a securely closed container with the bolt removed or
        with a trigger lock fitted; or
        (b) a locked container.
        Fairly straight forward but it raises the question, can you transport a firearm loaded. Answer - No
        59 Firearms to be kept unloaded other than when being
        used to shoot
        (1) A person who has a firearm under his or her control (whether
        or not another has custody of it) must ensure the firearm is
        unloaded, other than when it is being used to shoot.
        Which is great because this is where the ability to spotlight from your car comes from
        Example—
        When culling animals, X moves, with a rifle, between paddocks and
        crosses public roads that divide the paddocks. While the rifle is in X’s
        physical possession during the cull subsection (2) does not apply.
        Notes—
        1 See the Act, section 57 for the prohibition of particular conduct
        involving a weapon in a public place.
        2 See the Act, section 58 for the general prohibition of dangerous
        conduct involving a weapon.
        (3) The container must be—
        (a) out of sight in a locked room of a permanent building; or
        (b) locked in the boot of a vehicle; or
        (c) out of sight, locked in a vehicle that does not have a
        boot.
        So, to the letter of the law, when "transporting" firearms in QLD, they must be in a secure container AND out of sight. (In the boot if you have one, in a locked metal box that's secured to a UTE tray, or hidden from view in the passenger compartment).
        As soon as you leave the vehicle "unattended" you MUST, remove the bolt or fit a trigger lock or fit an action lock AND LOCK YOUR VEHICLE

        Comment


        • Varagner
          Varagner commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by tinytim" post=30877
          [color=#880000
          Maximum penalty—10 penalty units.
          (4) This section does not apply to a weapon to which section 60A
          applies.
          (4) is important because it means when you stop "attending" your vehicle you stop transporting and start storing

          60A Storage of weapon not in licensee’s physical
          possession—when away from secure storage facilities
          (1) This section applies to a weapon in the possession of a person
          who is—
          (a) the holder of a visitor’s licence; or
          (b) a visitor to Queensland to whom section 32(1) of the
          Act applies; or
          (c) to another person if—
          (i) the person is away from the person’s secure storage
          facilities; and
          (ii) it is unreasonable for the person to have to go to
          those facilities to store the weapon.
          So, when you are on the way to a legitimate activity and you need to stop, as soon as you stop "attending" your vehicle, this section applies.
          (2) A person who possesses a weapon to which this section
          applies must, when the weapon is not in the person’s physical
          possession, store it unloaded in—
          (a) a securely closed container with the bolt removed or
          with a trigger lock fitted; or
          (b) a locked container.
          Fairly straight forward but it raises the question, can you transport a firearm loaded. Answer - No
          59 Firearms to be kept unloaded other than when being
          used to shoot
          (1) A person who has a firearm under his or her control (whether
          or not another has custody of it) must ensure the firearm is
          unloaded, other than when it is being used to shoot.
          Which is great because this is where the ability to spotlight from your car comes from
          Example—
          When culling animals, X moves, with a rifle, between paddocks and
          crosses public roads that divide the paddocks. While the rifle is in X’s
          physical possession during the cull subsection (2) does not apply.
          Notes—
          1 See the Act, section 57 for the prohibition of particular conduct
          involving a weapon in a public place.
          2 See the Act, section 58 for the general prohibition of dangerous
          conduct involving a weapon.
          (3) The container must be—
          (a) out of sight in a locked room of a permanent building; or
          (b) locked in the boot of a vehicle; or
          (c) out of sight, locked in a vehicle that does not have a
          boot.
          So, to the letter of the law, when "transporting" firearms in QLD, they must be in a secure container AND out of sight. (In the boot if you have one, in a locked metal box that's secured to a UTE tray, or hidden from view in the passenger compartment).
          As soon as you leave the vehicle "unattended" you MUST, remove the bolt or fit a trigger lock or fit an action lock AND LOCK YOUR VEHICLE
          I disagree with you about the must remove the bolt of fit a trigger or action lock, the law specifies that whilst unattended the firearm must be kept in a

          "(2)(a) a securely closed container with the bolt removed or
          with a trigger lock fitted; or
          (b) a locked container.

          (3) The container must be—
          (a) out of sight in a locked room of a permanent building; or
          (b) locked in the boot of a vehicle; or
          (c) out of sight, locked in a vehicle that does not have a
          boot."

          Thus having a firearm in a range bag with a padlock through the zip would qualify as it being a locked container and having that stored in the locked boot or anything else that satisfies point 3 would be fine. Thus no requirement to remove the bolt or fit a trigger lock if you are leaving it unattended just need to lock the container the firearm is in and then store that container in accordance with the act.

      • #6
        Remind me to not travel with the Fun Police to the range.....

        Comment

        Working...
        X