NSW - Legality of modifying guns

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  • NSW - Legality of modifying guns

    I just had an interesting conversation with NSW FAR. It seems modification of firearms can only be done by a gunsmith. Firearms owners are only allowed to "shoot and clean" but not work on.

    The reason i asked them is I'm looking at importing some parts - iron sight, springs etc from the US and was wondering if i needed a B709A and also any clarification from Customs. I'm not intending to modify anything

    So according to FAR if I wanted to import parts I would need to nominate a firearms dealer to do the work. I can import parts myself but would then need a dealer/gunsmith to undertake the work itself. FAR did mention things like rails etc requiring a gunsmith, however "drop-in" were OK, although I think my definition and FARs definition of "drop-in" may be somewhat different. If you have to remove screws etc to get access to the parts is it considered "drop in"?

    FAR did say there is legislation on this and as a license holder I was informed, however I can't seem to find this reference on the FAR website now.

    Has anyone heard about this before?

    EDIT: Found the Firearms User Guide which mentions modification but only refers to mods like shortening the barrel, silencer, increased mag capacity to above the Cat restrictions.

    FAR Firearms Guice

  • #2
    A 'drop in' part is one that requires no alteration to make it fit into place. A (spare) detachable box magazine would be one example, so would be a different spring for a trigger mechanism.

    As I am in Vic. the foregoing is not NSW specific advice, just a common sense definition.
    This post may be fact or opinion, it is up to you to decide which.

    Comment


    • Guest's Avatar
      Guest commented
      Editing a comment
      Originally posted by TwoFourThree" post=30508
      A 'drop in' part is one that requires no alteration to make it fit into place. A (spare) detachable box magazine would be one example, so would be a different spring for a trigger mechanism.

      As I am in Vic. the foregoing is not NSW specific advice, just a common sense definition.
      Did you just use 'common sense' in a sentence about the NSW FAR? :lol: :lol: Obviously you don't live in NSW :lol: :lol:

  • #3
    NSW Police will only seek a prosecution in cases where it is obvious you have modified a firearm in a manner so as to alter its characteristics such as barrel length below minimum, magazine capacity above maximum, non-approved stock modification (I.e. folding or collapsible) or calibre change.

    You will always be free to do your own work on your firearms, but the registerable characteristics must be certified by a smith and this is passed to the FAR to allow a new registration certificate to be issued. A smith is also supposed to pick up on any non-approved modifications and let the registry know.

    You are free to fit your own sights, replace springs, fit new triggers, change barrels, remove rust and put a bulge in your own barrel. (Last one is legal but not recommended).

    Just don't try to build your own prohibited weapon or modify the characteristics of a firearm with the intent to deceive a forensic examination.

    Comment


    • #4
      Originally posted by TheOtherLeft" post=30498
      I just had an interesting conversation with NSW FAR. It seems modification of firearms can only be done by a gunsmith. Firearms owners are only allowed to "shoot and clean" but not work on.

      The reason i asked them is I'm looking at importing some parts - iron sight, springs etc from the US and was wondering if i needed a B709A and also any clarification from Customs. I'm not intending to modify anything

      So according to FAR if I wanted to import parts I would need to nominate a firearms dealer to do the work. I can import parts myself but would then need a dealer/gunsmith to undertake the work itself. FAR did mention things like rails etc requiring a gunsmith, however "drop-in" were OK, although I think my definition and FARs definition of "drop-in" may be somewhat different. If you have to remove screws etc to get access to the parts is it considered "drop in"?

      FAR did say there is legislation on this and as a license holder I was informed, however I can't seem to find this reference on the FAR website now.

      Has anyone heard about this before?

      EDIT: Found the Firearms User Guide which mentions modification but only refers to mods like shortening the barrel, silencer, increased mag capacity to above the Cat restrictions.

      FAR Firearms Guice
      I think you just ended up with the wrong individual on the phone (shoot and clean!! That's possibly all a police officer can do, it's the same in the Army), or perhaps use of the word "modify" confused the issue. You can't "modify" a firearm as previously explained. I don't believe there is anything to stop you repairing, adjusting or otherwise "tailoring" your own firearm. Just don't change the fundamental characteristics and if you're not sure, DON'T

      Comment


      • scythe
        scythe commented
        Editing a comment
        I think you need to call up again and not speak to that person.
        Because they clearly do not understand what legislation actually is.
        That guide is just that a guide, if it were me I would go back to the act and regulations to get a proper answer.
        It all comes down to the definition of modify/modification(s).
        Obviously all you are doing is installing parts that will in no way change the firearms classification, method of loading, ammunition capacity above what is legally allowed on your current licence or the dimentions to above/below legal.
        So to recap, installing parts "should" be ok but as soon as you start altering the way your firearm operates or what it fires then you need the appropriate licences.
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