Plinking in Vic state forest

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Plinking in Vic state forest

    I've had people tell me either way on this, is it ok? Also what regulations are applicable if it is not.

  • #2
    I've heard some say yes and some say no! Best bet is to give DSE a call and get it from the horses mouth so to speak, if they give you the ok ask to have it emailed to you as a back up.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you can hunt in them you can plink in them. I have not seen any legislation, Act or regulation that says otherwise. I "plink" with a .30-06 and .204 in the state forests surrounding me. All are legal deer hunting areas. Just don't do it from a road, track or across them. Have a safe backdrop.
      I'm in love with Jennifer Hawkins and Alessandra Ambrosio

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Sambar Country" post=16820
        If you can hunt in them you can plink in them. I have not seen any legislation, Act or regulation that says otherwise. I "plink" with a .30-06 and .204 in the state forests surrounding me. All are legal deer hunting areas. Just don't do it from a road, track or across them. Have a safe backdrop.
        I've seen the legislation about 'public roads', curious about your reference to 'track'?

    • #4
      Our Local divisional firearms officer indicated that you cannot plink in Victorian State forests. Without quoting any official legislation he mentioned there can be confusion because you are allowed to sight your scope in while huntign in a state forest. I suppose the question is "After how many shots does sighting in a scope become Plinking?". It usually takes me 50 shots to sight my scope in

      Comment


      • Sambar Country
        Sambar Country commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by VB1971" post=16887
        Our Local divisional firearms officer indicated that you cannot plink in Victorian State forests. Without quoting any official legislation he mentioned there can be confusion because you are allowed to sight your scope in while huntign in a state forest. I suppose the question is "After how many shots does sighting in a scope become Plinking?". It usually takes me 50 shots to sight my scope in
        If it takes 50 or 100 shots to zero your rifle so be it. Just do it safely.

    • #5
      Exactly Wal. This topic came up many times before in the old forum. No one was ever able to provide evidence that plinking was illegal in the State Forests of Victoria. Think I'll go plinking later in the day. Might see you out plinking in N/E Vic one day.
      I'm in love with Jennifer Hawkins and Alessandra Ambrosio

      Comment


      • Guest's Avatar
        Guest commented
        Editing a comment
        Originally posted by Sambar Country" post=17146
        Exactly Wal. Might see you out plinking in N/E Vic one day.
        Could do ............. I think we have both ends of the N/E covered.

    • #6
      Dear shineyshooter dont worry just enjoy plinking in the SF

      In my SF there are lot of spent cases from 30-06 to 22lr,12g, and clay debris, gas bottles etc. A hunter who hunts deer in that area told me ranger wont bother you as long as have good back stop, and sight in is ok but target shooting is no go.
      Free Men Own Guns Slaves Don’t

      To Enslaves a Nation , Disarm The Citizens !

      When seconds Count, Police are only Minutes away

      Comment


      • #7
        if your going to plink always clean up after your self, but it dosnt hurt to leave your plinking targets for other people to enjoy

        Comment


        • Sambar Country
          Sambar Country commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by Squishie" post=18356
          if your going to plink always clean up after your self, but it dosnt hurt to leave your plinking targets for other people to enjoy
          Clean up everything mate.

      • #8
        yeah i'd definitely be interested in a definitive answer on this, if for no other reason then wanting somewhere i can longer distances which is on my to do list early next year

        Comment


        • ax338
          ax338 commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally posted by Nomad" post=18465
          yeah i'd definitely be interested in a definitive answer on this, if for no other reason then wanting somewhere i can longer distances which is on my to do list early next year
          the answer is stop asking stupid questions or youll get new stupid laws

      • #9
        you know whats pathetic.. when I was living in NZ which is a Commonwealth country I was in the Invercargill Arms office (Police Station) asking where i could sight in my rifle as i lived in town.. the exact words from his mouth

        "Go down to Oretti Beach and try not to hit anything expensive" Oretti beach is classified as a legal road..

        God I miss NZ.. But im on the East coast now so its not a far way to fly

        Comment


        • #10
          Good morning Shineyshooter [obviously changed]

          Public roads are any road that appears in the government gazette for roads open to the public. Roads within a state forest that do not have restricted access are public roads . Logging tracks are not gazetted roads

          For recreational shooting you must only use the firearm for the designated purpose of the Licence e.g. 'Hunting', this does not give you the provision to zero or sight your rifle on marker in a tree for instance. To zero /sight your rifle in you need to use an approved shooting range or someone's private property whose owner gives you authority to shoot on their land.

          Some Long Range rifle clubs have Field Class events which is an ideal opportunity for hunters to sight in at 100, 200 & 300 yards

          Regards


          Paul Connor | Acting Senior Sergeant 30279 – Compliance Support Unit | Licensing & Regulation Division | Victoria Police

          _____________________________________
          email: [email protected] | web address: www.police.vic.gov.au
          phone: (03) 9247 6322 | 0400 717 569
          address: Victoria Police Centre Tower 3, Level 4, 637
          Flinders Street, Docklands Vic 3008
          From above, I wanted to understand what constitutes public road [to know when I have to pull out the ammo]. I did ask about walking tracks also to which there isn't a clear answer unless you want to look up what roads are gazetted. [of course I'm supposed to even know where this is] It also clearly demonstrates that public land can't be used for sighting in rifles according to Acting Senior Sergeant Paul Connor. Whilst it is not definitive, it's a good indicator for myself at least, as to where the police see the law to be. The reason I wanted to get some idea of the interruptions of the law was to be compliant and not risk serious charges.

          I'm also quite uncomfortable with these laws as they stand, a further reminder for at least myself to write to MP's [our representatives] about our views. As it showed as a counter example above, in NZ sighting in on a beach, or a friend mentioning how when they were a kid they brought the SKS to school for show and tell and the teacher only inquired "I hope you're going to school, not hunting today". We might not have much clout as an individual and I do encourage you to do the same with whatever you find as unjust, discriminatory and unfair laws, so that the uneducated don't end up with charges because of ignorance. I remember very well from my Safety course how the police officer conducting it told us how most police 'don't like guns' [I presume in the hands of non-police] and how most officers don't know firearms laws very well and generally less knowledge about firearms too. I for one wish to be educated to be able to keep shooting, looks like I'll have to stick to the pistol club and that very rare drive to the long distant range 90mins away for some fun and be super careful when hunting as I love the sport too much to risk it.

          Comment


          • #11
            I spent this arvo sighting in my rifle at the local S.F. Had a brief visit from a couple of rangers who said they had come to that particular spot to organise a field trip for students. Both rangers seemed to be perfectly fine with what I was doing.

            I'll make a point though: CLEAN UP YOUR F*CKING JUNK. Parts of Toolangi S.F are beginning to look like a bloody rubbish tip, and Blind Freddy could see that the crap is being left behind by shooters!!

            Comment


            • #12
              Originally posted by shineyshooter" post=16811
              I've had people tell me either way on this, is it ok? Also what regulations are applicable if it is not.
              It's perfectly legal to sight in a firearm in a Victorian S.F.

              From what I have seen, there's an unspoken understanding between local authorities & shooters about sighting in.

              If you go repeatedly questioning the authorities about the matter, you'll be drawing unnecessary attention to the situation.

              Comment


              • #13
                If you go repeatedly questioning the authorities about the matter, you'll be drawing unnecessary attention to the situation.
                Whilst I understand and respect the tenor of your statement, that is, don't rock the boat, with potentially large fines/jail sentence/confiscation of all firearms, I'm not prepared to just go with the flow or hearsay. Ignorance is 'no' excuse in the eyes of the law and I will not just take the opinion of a layperson. My questioned asked " Also what regulations are applicable if it is not. " to which your statement has 'not' substantiated that it is ok or not ok, where as I have shown evidence of how Paul Connor [Act Senior Sergeant] is saying it's not ok from the division that enforces the law.

                Paul Connor, was very clear about sighting in, and whilst there's bound to be members of the police and rangers who don't mind you sighting in, I cannot rely on their good will, or lack of knowledge of the laws alone nor even Paul Connor's interruption for that matter. I myself have educated myself in this area as best as a layperson could and wrote because there was no clear legislation or how it would apply. I had read the laws quite a few times and couldn't understand these areas, so naturally enough I contacted the LRD so that I could understand and also share this info, so that fewer needed to "repeatedly questioning the authorities about the matter".

                It 'does' stink, it's ridiculous that go back a decade [as I understand it] and you could plink away in forests and do no harm even if we were less mindful of safety and backstops [I like the safety courses we're made to do] but I didn't bring up my opinions with the LRD, it's up to government how laws are written and as citizens it is up to us to influence them to 'represent' us. When writing letters to MPs I think we would be best to approach it on mass, and regularly, with a LONG list of things we want changed, ask for way too much and then we can at least get something out of it. It's way past whining to each other about it.

                Comment


                • Guest's Avatar
                  Guest commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Originally posted by shineyshooter" post=22929
                  If you go repeatedly questioning the authorities about the matter, you'll be drawing unnecessary attention to the situation.
                  Whilst I understand and respect the tenor of your statement, that is, don't rock the boat, with potentially large fines/jail sentence/confiscation of all firearms, I'm not prepared to just go with the flow or hearsay. Ignorance is 'no' excuse in the eyes of the law and I will not just take the opinion of a layperson. My questioned asked " Also what regulations are applicable if it is not. " to which your statement has 'not' substantiated that it is ok or not ok, where as I have shown evidence of how Paul Connor [Act Senior Sergeant] is saying it's not ok from the division that enforces the law.

                  Paul Connor, was very clear about sighting in, and whilst there's bound to be members of the police and rangers who don't mind you sighting in, I cannot rely on their good will, or lack of knowledge of the laws alone nor even Paul Connor's interruption for that matter. I myself have educated myself in this area as best as a layperson could and wrote because there was no clear legislation or how it would apply. I had read the laws quite a few times and couldn't understand these areas, so naturally enough I contacted the LRD so that I could understand and also share this info, so that fewer needed to "repeatedly questioning the authorities about the matter".

                  It 'does' stink, it's ridiculous that go back a decade [as I understand it] and you could plink away in forests and do no harm even if we were less mindful of safety and backstops [I like the safety courses we're made to do] but I didn't bring up my opinions with the LRD, it's up to government how laws are written and as citizens it is up to us to influence them to 'represent' us. When writing letters to MPs I think we would be best to approach it on mass, and regularly, with a LONG list of things we want changed, ask for way too much and then we can at least get something out of it. It's way past whining to each other about it.
                  I think these are all good points. In particular, getting some clarification of the law. Maybe it would be better to get some advice from a solicitor instead of the police. Perhaps SSAA, Australian Deer Association or some other organisation has someone in their ranks that is qualified to interpret the laws. I find that sometimes the police find it too easy to say "no" to everything, and often it's simply to cover their own backsides. I you were to speak to a qualified person who's on our team, they might be able to point to specific parts of the laws that clarify things a bit better.
              Working...
              X